CRTC Three-Year Plan 2014-2017

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Chairman and CEO’s Message

I am pleased to present the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC) Three-Year Plan for 2014-2017.

The CRTC has recently encouraged greater dialogue with Canadian citizens, creators, and consumers on a range of issues that concern their communication system. This document is intended to help them prepare for our future activities, including participation in our public consultations. This document also serves as a key planning tool for the CRTC and demonstrates our accountability and transparency to the Canadian public.

The CRTC is committed to ensuring that Canadians have access to, and are at the centre of, a world-class communication system. In this year’s Three-Year Plan, you will find a scorecard that provides an update on the activities we previously identified in the Three-Year Plan for 2013-2016. You will also find an outline of the activities we plan to carry out over the next three years.

Through these activities, the CRTC strives to achieve its priorities, which include modernizing the regulatory framework for the Canadian broadcasting system, improving access to advanced and competitive communication services, strengthening the security and safety of Canadians through the communication system, and building a high-performing organization.

The activities we intend to carry out in the shorter term include holding a public consultation on the television system and initiating a review of the basic telecommunications services required by Canadians to participate fully in the digital economy. We will also begin to enforce Canada’s anti-spam legislation and launch the Spam Reporting Centre. As well, we will prepare to establish a Voter Contact Registry, should Parliament decide to grant us this new responsibility.

As a public institution, the CRTC must be accountable to Canadians and keep pace with their evolving needs and interests. This is particularly important in a communications environment that is undergoing significant transformation as Canadians adopt innovative technologies. In addition, we are mindful of the impact our activities and regulations may have on the broadcasting and telecommunications sectors. As such, we may need to revisit some of the activities listed in this plan as we adapt to a dynamic and ever-changing marketplace.

At the CRTC, we look forward to the ambitious agenda we have set out for ourselves, as well as to continuing our work in the public interest and fulfilling the mandate entrusted to us by Parliament. The input we will receive from Canadians along the way will not only be instructive, it will also help us become a more responsive and trusted regulator.

Jean-Pierre Blais

Introduction

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) regulates and supervises Canada’s communication system in accordance with the mandate entrusted to it by Parliament, including achieving the policy objectives established in the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act. The CRTC also has responsibilities under Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL). It delivers its mandate from offices in the National Capital Region and regional offices throughout Canada, with participation from both National and Regional Commissioners and with support from professional staff.

This Three-Year Plan summarizes the key activities the CRTC expects to carry out through the period ending March 31, 2017, and provides the status of each activity from 2013-2014, as set out in the 2013-2016 Three-Year Plan. This document is intended to provide Canadians with information on the CRTC’s plans in order to help them prepare for and participate in the CRTC’s activities. This document is available to the public through the CRTC’s website.

Outcomes

Guided by its legislative mandate, the CRTC seeks to ensure that Canadians have access to a world-class communication system. This overarching objective is supported by three pillars:

  • CREATE - The CRTC’s activities under this pillar contribute to a broadcasting system that provides Canadians with a wealth of compelling and diverse content. The creation of diverse programming that reflects the attitudes, opinions, ideas, values and artistic creativity of Canadians enables their participation in their country’s democratic and cultural life. Ongoing activities include the following:

    • analyzing various applications for the issuance, renewal and amendment of licences for broadcasting undertakings;
    • issuing Canadian Program Certification to independent Canadian program producers for TV productions;
    • monitoring the programming and financial performance of undertakings to ensure compliance with regulations and conditions of licences; and,
    • approving mergers, acquisitions and changes of ownership of broadcasting undertakings.
  • CONNECT - The CRTC’s activities under this pillar contribute to a communications system that provides Canadians, including those with disabilities, quality and affordable communication service options. The communications system strengthens the social and economic fabric of Canada, and enables Canadians to have access to compelling and diverse Canadian content. Ongoing activities include the following:

    • ensuring adherence to rules and policies including those related to competition, quality of service and Internet traffic management;
    • addressing applications related to the rates, terms, or conditions of services, including applications to refrain from rate regulation;
    • managing the use of telephone numbers in Canada;
    • managing the contribution and subsidy regime that supports basic residential local services in rural and remote areas;
    • resolving industry disputes and complaints through both formal Commission processes and staff-assisted dispute resolution; and,
    • coordinating the activities of the CRTC Interconnection Steering Committee, which assists the CRTC in developing information, procedures and guidelines concerning various regulatory activities.
  • PROTECT - The CRTC’s activities under this pillar contribute to the protection and safety of Canadians within the communication system. By promoting and enforcing compliance with legislation and regulatory measures, the CRTC strengthens the participation of communications service providers in offering safety-enhancing services to Canadians, and seeks to reduce unsolicited commercial communication messages. Ongoing activities include the following:

    • monitoring industry compliance with rules regarding the loudness of TV commercials, in response to public complaints;
    • monitoring industry compliance with respect to stolen wireless handsets, by assessing and publishing annual progress reports from the wireless industry;
    • promoting compliance with CASL and the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules, including the National Do Not Call List (DNCL), and investigating alleged instances of non-compliance;
    • working with domestic and international enforcement and regulatory agencies to enhance information sharing, and coordinating operational responses;
    • monitoring compliance with the Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations, payable to the DNCL operator; and,
    • undertaking outreach and awareness initiatives, so that consumers can make informed choices and take measures to protect themselves, and to improve industry awareness of requirements.
  • In addition, a commitment to MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE underlies the work of the CRTC for each of the pillars. Ongoing activities include the following:

    • consulting and informing Canadians, and responding to their inquiries and complaints through a variety of traditional as well as innovative communications channels;
    • organizing Commission meetings, public hearings and processes;
    • issuing notices, orders, and decisions;
    • managing financial resources, including broadcasting licence fees, telecommunications fees, and telemarketing fees;
    • managing human resources, accommodation services, and security;
    • managing information technology and information management, including administering requests submitted pursuant to the Access to Information Act;
    • monitoring and reporting on Canada’s communication system;
    • corporate planning and reporting, including reports to Parliament and the Annual Report on Official Languages to the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages;
    • facilitating industry co-regulation and self-regulation through consultations, committees, and, working groups;
    • collaborating with domestic and international partners on communications issues; and,
    • providing legal services.

The communications environment is very dynamic. Accordingly, the CRTC may need to adjust its plan to respond to emerging issues. A rolling Three-Year Plan is published annually in April, at the beginning of the CRTC’s fiscal year.

Status Report on 2013-2014 Activities

The CRTC’s 2013-2016 Three-Year Plan, published in May 2013, set out a number of commitments for the year 2013-2014. Below is a list of these activities. Some activities have been completed, others are ongoing, and others were not yet completed. For example, some public hearings or proceedings may have been undertaken last year, and the decision may not yet be published, so the activity is included as ongoing. Other activities, such as ownership transactions, are not foreseeable in advance and may have required that other activities were not completed.

Legend:

Status 2013-14 Activity Status as of April 2014
Create
Ongoing activity

Public Consultation on Television

The initial public engagement phase of the public consultation (2013-563) on television was completed, including the launch of Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians on the Future of their Television System (Let’s Talk TV) and Let’s Talk TV Choicebook. The public consultation on television will continue in 2014-15.

Ongoing activity

Commercial Radio Policy

Consultations were conducted with key stakeholders to identify issues for the review. A notice of public consultation targeting certain elements of the current policy framework was published in October 2013. In 2014-15, a revised Commercial Radio Policy framework will be issued.

Activity not completed

Cultural Diversity Policy

A preliminary review was initiated of the Cultural Diversity Policy corporate reports submitted by broadcasters, but this review was put on hold as a result of the launch of Let’s Talk TV. Plans to examine the Cultural Diversity Policy will be re-evaluated in the context of the outcome of Let’s Talk TV.

Ongoing activity

Ethnic Broadcasting Policy

Initial research was undertaken to determine the scope of this activity and to begin to identify specific issues, including those that may be identified as a result of Let’s Talk TV.

Completed activity

Ethnic Radio Licensing

Research was conducted and consultations with key stakeholders were held.

Completed activity

Distribution and Licence Renewal of Independent Television services

By August 2013, the CRTC treated more than 100 applications that were part of this proceeding, most from small independent programming services. Some television services were granted mandatory distribution as part of the digital basic service of broadcasting distribution undertakings as a result of Broadcasting Regulatory Policy (2013-372). These programming services include services for persons with disabilities, a service that provides programming for official language minority communities and programming for Aboriginal Canadians.

Ongoing activity

Tangible Benefits Policy

A public consultation (2013-558) on various aspects of the CRTC’s approach to tangible benefits and determining the value of the transaction closed in early 2014. In 2014-15, the Commission will issue a decision on this proceeding.

Completed activity

BCE/Astral Merger

In June 2013, the CRTC issued Broadcasting Decisions (2013-308, 2013-309 and 2013-310) approving the proposed merger of BCE and Astral with conditions, including the divestiture of various assets.

Ongoing activity

Vertical Integration Framework

The CRTC released decisions (2013-578 and 2013-585) in October 2013 concerning the conduct of audits of subscriber information and the establishment of baseline provisions for non-disclosure. Moving forward, the CRTC will make final regulations to put into effect the Commission’s determinations.

Completed activity

Obligations under section 41 of the Official Languages Act, Part VII

The CRTC held two discussion group meetings with Official Language Minority Communities to discuss issues of interest and to inform them of processes that could affect them.

Connect
Completed activity

Regulatory Framework and Modernization Plan for Northwestel

Telecommunications Regulatory Policy (2013-711) was issued in December 2013. It included determinations that the current price cap and basket structure with minor modifications, remain appropriate; that the rollout of Northwestel’s modernization plan will be monitored; and that rates for the Wholesale Connect service were modified, and the Commission decided that it would regulate Northwestel’s retail Internet and Ethernet wide area network services in terrestrially served areas.

Ongoing activity

Wholesale Services Policy

In October 2013, the CRTC initiated a public consultation (2013-551) on the Wholesale Services Policy. As of April 2014, an initial round of comments and requests for additional information has been received. In preparation for a public hearing in 2014-15, a second round of comments and additional information from parties will be requested.

Completed activity

Model Municipal Access Agreement

In its decision (2013-618), issued in November 2013, the CRTC approved consensus items regarding a model Municipal Access Agreement (MAA) and stated that non-consensus items are to be negotiated between municipalities and carriers. Canadian carriers and municipalities can use the model MAA as a non-binding resource to facilitate negotiations regarding the installation of telecommunications infrastructure. By streamlining the negotiation process and reducing the number of disputes, the model MAA will shorten the timeframe for municipalities and carriers to enter into MAAs, thereby fostering the provision of competitive telecommunications services.

Ongoing activity

Broadband Performance Measurement

The CRTC held a workshop in April 2013 with a broadband measurement vendor and major Internet service providers to discuss a national project, and to define the associated issues and parameters. The first phase of a national measurement campaign to Canadian subscribers will start in 2014 in collaboration with some of the major Internet service providers.

Ongoing activity

Payphones

In July 2013, public consultations (2013-337 and 2013-338) were undertaken to start a fact-finding process on the role of payphones in the Canadian communication system, and to consider a proposed interim freeze on the removal of the last payphone in a community. A decision (2013-708) on the interim freeze was issued in December 2013. The fact-finding process will be finalized and a process will be launched as required.

Ongoing activity

Accessibility of Mobile Wireless Handsets

A report was commissioned in 2013-14 to examine the state and accessibility of mobile wireless handsets in Canada. In 2014-15, the CRTC will examine the results to determine what regulatory action, if any, may be required.

Completed activity

Video Relay Service

In March 2013, a public consultation (2013-155) was launched, followed by a public hearing in October 2013. In April 2014, the Video Relay Service decision was published and follow-up processes were initiated.

Protect
Ongoing activity

Inquiry into 9-1-1 services

The Inquiry Officer completed his report, which was released with the launch of a public consultation (2013-549) in October 2013. The notice asked for comments on the 9-1-1 Inquiry report and input on 9-1-1 priorities. Enhancements to 9-1-1 will provide Canadians with more advanced emergency response services that can provide faster response times and more immediate and focused emergency services, whether medical or other life-saving measures.

Completed activity

Implementation of Enhanced 9-1-1 Capabilities

The “in-call location update feature” has been implemented by all carriers. This feature allows public safety answering points that support the feature to request updated location information associated with a wireless 9-1-1 caller who is in motion or has changed locations. This feature is expected to improve the effectiveness of the Canadian 9-1-1 service and will help responders more accurately pinpoint a caller’s location so that emergency services can be provided more quickly. In addition, wireless carriers completed the implementation of the text messaging with 9-1-1 feature. This feature will enable Canadians who have hearing or speech impairments to communicate with 9-1-1 call centres via text message in areas where municipal and provincial governments have made the necessary changes to their 9-1-1 call centres.

Completed activity

Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules (UTRs)

The CRTC conducted a public consultation (2013-140) to review the UTRs and published regulatory policy (2014-155).

Completed activity

Administration and Enforcement of Unsolicited Telecommunication Rules (UTRs) and Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL)

The CRTC issued 51 compliance letters, 7 citations and 28 Notices of Violation totalling $1,028,400.00. These enforcement actions contributed to promoting and ensuring compliance with the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules.

Completed activity

Compliance with Telecommunication Rules (UTRs) and Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL)

An outreach plan was developed and implemented for CASL and the UTRs. The CRTC conducted outreach and education sessions across the country including visits to Halifax, Montreal, Quebec City, Toronto, Edmonton, Calgary, and Vancouver, and met with over 1250 organizations.

Ongoing activity

Permanent Number Registration

A public consultation process (2013-527) was undertaken to consider the appropriateness of making consumer telecommunications number registrations on the National Do Not Call List (DNCL) permanent and therefore removing the onus from the consumer to re-register after six years. The CRTC will publish its decision in 2014-15.

Completed activity

Wireless Code

The Wireless Code decision (2013-271) was published in May 2013 and came into effect in December 2013. The CRTC will create a compliance framework to monitor and address non-compliance.

Completed activity

Loudness of Commercials

In 2013-14, the CRTC supported the implementation of technical solutions by the industry to help it comply with the restrictions on the loudness of television commercials. The CRTC continues to monitor the number of related complaints and act to ensure compliance and enforcement of CRTC determinations.

Completed activity

Stolen Wireless Handsets

The Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association submitted its annual report related to this issue. This information along with a link to the public service campaign launched to protect consumers, (i.e., www.ProtectYourData.ca), was published on the CRTC website.

Ongoing activity

Consumer Outreach Activities

Consumer outreach activities have been undertaken throughout the CRTC. The activities were targeted and continue on a file-by-file basis.

Ongoing activity

Emergency Alerting

In February 2014, proposed amendments to regulations (2014-85) were published for comment with respect to the participation of the broadcasting industry in emergency alerting.

Management Excellence
Completed activity

Financial Systems

An effective risk-based system of internal control is in place at the CRTC and is properly maintained, monitored and reviewed, with timely corrective measures taken when issues are identified, as demonstrated by the Departmental Statement of Management Responsibility Including Internal Control Over Financial Reporting.

Completed activity

Investment Plan

The CRTC’s Investment Plan 2013-14 to 2017-18 was approved by the CRTC Chairman and sent to the Secretary of the Treasury Board in June 2013.

Completed activity

Organizational/Efficiency Review

During 2013-14, the CRTC continued to identify and implement measures that contributed to reducing its annual operating costs. The CRTC achieved its targeted reduction in expenditures in 2013-14, spending at least 5% less than the authorized spending levels approved by Parliament in the 2013-14 Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates.

Completed activity

Values and Ethics

CRTC employees received training on the subject of Respect in the Workplace and Values and Ethics. Moreover, a CRTC Champion for Values and Ethics was appointed, the CRTC’s intranet site was updated to inform employees of their roles and responsibilities with respect to Values and Ethics and outreach initiatives were conducted with all CRTC employees. All of the CRTC’s Values and Ethics initiatives referenced the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector.

Completed activity

IM/IT Strategic Plan

The following elements of the IM/IT Strategic Plan were completed in 2013-14: replacement of the storage area network to ensure a robust storage component supporting CRTC systems; implementation of a multi-platform support for audio streaming of public hearings; improvements to Metatagging and Best Bets maintenance on the CRTC web site; creation of an executive oversight committee; and upgrades to the CRTC’s document management system.

Completed activity

Security and Business Continuity

In 2013-14, the CRTC updated its Business Continuity Plan and its Disaster Recovery Plan, increased physical security for the Spam Reporting Centre, completed an identification of its security risks, and completed security assessments of regional offices and hearings.

Completed activity

Employee Development

A leadership development program and a strategic thinking training are being offered to employees. An innovation and creativity training course was developed and offered in partnership with the Canada School of Public Service. An Inuit Internship program was initiated.

Completed activity

Industry Monitoring and Reporting

In response to feedback from readers, the 2013 Communications Monitoring Report was drafted with greater use of plain language and included new or expanded data on payphones and telecommunications wholesale service revenue.

Ongoing activity

The CRTC’s Digital Presence

The CRTC made numerous improvements to its digital presence, including the implementation of a new information architecture for the CRTC website and rendering its website accessible, in compliance with the Treasury Board Secretariat’s July 2013 deadline. The CRTC also increased activity on social media and Web 2.0 platforms, archived 11,000 web pages, created mobile-friendly landing pages, developed a new RSS feed for daily releases, and revised the intervention form for public proceedings.

Completed activity

Compliance Audit Function

A comprehensive review of the compliance audit process for broadcasting distribution undertaking contributions to Canadian programming was completed, which resulted in the adoption of a sampling-based audit methodology and an audit frequency plan to audit compliance on an on-going basis.

Completed activity

Consumer Lens

The Consumer Lens analytical tool was implemented in May 2013, so that the impact of CRTC decisions on consumers could be assessed and taken into consideration. In 2014-15, this analytical tool will be reviewed.

Completed activity

Strategic Planning

The CRTC completed its development of new planning tools and processes and is moving forward with the implementation of a standard corporate planning cycle.

Completed activity

International Activities

In 2013-14, the CRTC participated in the work of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Committee on Consumer Policy, and the Working Party on Communication Infrastructures and Services Policy. As part of its efforts to reduce telephony and electronic commerce abuse practices and related threats, the CRTC participated in the Messaging, Malware and Mobile Anti-Abuse Working Group (M3AAWG) workshop and the kick-off of the special interest group on Voice and Telephony Anti-Abuse (San Francisco, February 2014).

Create

CRTC Priority

  • Modernizing the regulatory framework for the Canadian broadcasting system
'Create' activities for the next three years
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17

Public Consultation on TelevisionFootnote 1

Building on Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians and Let’s Talk TV: Choicebook, launched in 2013-14, the CRTC will move into the next phase of the initiative. In this phase, the CRTC will launch a formal policy review process and hold a public hearing. Throughout the review process, the CRTC will continue to engage Canadians in developing a regulatory framework for the future of television in Canada. The CRTC will then issue its policy determinations articulating a renewed regulatory framework for Canadian television and begin its implementation.

The CRTC will also respond to the Government of Canada’s request under Section 15 for a report on unbundling of TV channels by April 30, 2014.

Public Consultation on Television

The CRTC will continue the implementation of the renewed framework. The CRTC will assess the need for and initiate follow-up proceedings to address issues that arise during the implementation phase, as required. The CRTC will also draft new regulations, exemption orders and conditions of licence, as required.

Public Consultation on Television

The CRTC will monitor to assess the effectiveness of the renewed framework.

Commercial Radio Policy

The CRTC will complete its review of the Commercial Radio Policy, with a view to simplifying the regulatory framework for commercial radio to make it more efficient and easier to administer. This review could include a follow-up to the Canadian content development administration process, a discussion on the deployment of terrestrial digital technology, and a study of alternative sanctions that could be imposed instead of short-term licence renewals.

Commercial Radio Policy

The CRTC will implement the revised elements of the policy (i.e. new processes will be adopted by the CRTC when dealing with commercial radio files).

The CRTC will assess the need for follow-up proceedings regarding digital radio broadcast technology.

Commercial Radio Policy

The CRTC will monitor and assess effectiveness.

Cultural Diversity Policy

This policy seeks to ensure that the Canadian broadcasting system, through both programming and employment opportunities, serves the needs and interests, and reflects the circumstances and aspirations of all Canadians, celebrating and recognizing the diversity of Canadian society. In the context of the results of the Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians proceeding, the CRTC will restart the development of the research phase and the review of the plans and reports on cultural diversity submitted by broadcasters.

Cultural Diversity Policy

Following the internal research phase, the CRTC may undertake a public fact finding exercise.

Ethnic Radio Licensing

Following market research, the CRTC will undertake a targeted review of its Ethnic Policy focusing only on radio services to reflect and address the specific circumstances of this media. A revised policy that is specifically designed for over-the-air radio services will anticipate and permit changes in the programming of licensed services to respond to changes in the evolving dynamics of ethnic communities in Canada.

Ethnic Radio Licensing

The CRTC will publish its decision on a revised policy and begin implementation.

Native Radio Policy

The CRTC will undertake a targeted review of the existing policy, which covers radio and television serving Aboriginal peoples. The review will focus primarily on specific aspects of a regulatory framework that is effective, appropriate and adapted to the realities of radio stations serving Aboriginal peoples.

Vertical Integration Framework

The CRTC will issue a decision on proposed regulatory amendments to implement the baseline provisions for non-disclosure agreements and requirements related to the audit of subscriber information held by broadcasting distribution undertakings, to implement Broadcasting Regulatory Policies (2013-578 and 2013-585).

Tangible Benefits Policy / Value of the Transaction

The CRTC will issue a decision and implement the new methodology and process for determining tangible benefits and the value of the transaction. The CRTC’s intention is to streamline and provide additional guidance and clarity so that the benefits proposed by applicants seeking approval for ownership changes will yield measurable improvements to the communities served by the broadcasting distribution undertakings and to the Canadian broadcasting system.

Tangible Benefits Policy / Values of the Transaction

The CRTC will monitor and assess the effectiveness of modifications to the methodology in achieving the stated objectives.

Renewal of French-language Television Licences

The CRTC will initiate a process to review the licence renewal applications of the French-language television stations owned by Québecor Média Inc. and Remstar Diffusion. This process will be an opportunity to determine whether licensees are fulfilling their regulatory obligations, to provide programming that reflects the interests of Canadians and that contributes appropriately to the creation and presentation of Canadian content.

Renewal of Rogers’ Television Licences

The CRTC will undertake a process to renew the licences of Rogers’ television services: Citytv stations in Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, Montréal and Saskatchewan; and specialty channels: The Biography Channel; G4Tech; Outdoor Life; and Sportsnet, to ensure that Rogers is providing programming that meets the interests of Canadians and makes an appropriate contribution to the creation and broadcast of Canadian content.

Community Television Policy

The CRTC will assess the ongoing effectiveness of the Community Television Policy.

Licence Renewals for English-language Television Groups (Bell, Shaw, Corus)

The CRTC will initiate a process to renew the licences of Bell, Shaw and Corus. This process will determine if the English-language television groups have fulfilled their regulatory obligations set out in their 2011 licences.

Licence Renewals for English-language Television Groups

The CRTC will conclude its process and release its licence renewal decisions.

Obligations under section 41 of the Official Languages Act, Part VII

The CRTC will continue working with the CRTC-Official Language Minority Communities discussion group as a forum for exchange, communication, and cooperation, in order to maximize participation in CRTC public proceedings. The CRTC will also hold two CRTC-official language minority communities discussion group meetings.

Obligations under section 41 of the Official Languages Act, Part VII

The CRTC will hold two CRTC-Official Language Minority Communities discussion group meetings. The CRTC will also draft and present the Results-Based Action Plan – Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act 2015-18.

Obligations under section 41 of the Official Languages Act, Part VII

The CRTC will hold two CRTC-Official Language Minority Communities discussion group meetings.

Connect

CRTC Priority

  • Improving access to advanced and competitive communications services
'Connect' activities for the next three years
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17

Regulatory Framework and Modernization Plan for Northwestel

The CRTC will implement a renewed regulatory framework for Northwestel. It will also monitor the implementation of Northwestel’s network modernization plan.

Modernization Plan for Northwestel

The CRTC will monitor the implementation of Northwestel’s network modernization plan.

Modernization Plan for Northwestel

The CRTC will monitor the implementation of Northwestel’s network modernization plan.

Wholesale Services and Associated PoliciesFootnote 2

The CRTC will review, by means of a public hearing, non-wireless wholesale services (including fibre-to-the-premises facilities) and their associated policies. The main goal of this review will be to ensure that the wholesale service framework, in the areas where required, is facilitating the development of a competitive Canadian telecommunications market, while balancing the incentives to invest in innovative networks.

Wholesale Services and Associated Policies

The CRTC will implement new measures, if any, following its wholesale services review and initiate follow-up proceedings as required.

Wholesale Services and Associated Policies

The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of the wholesale services framework.

Wholesale Mobile Wireless Services

The CRTC will determine, by means of a public hearing, whether regulatory intervention is required to address wholesale mobile wireless service issues.

Wholesale Mobile Wireless Services

The CRTC will implement new measures, if any, following its wholesale mobile wireless services review, and initiate follow-up proceedings as required.

Wholesale Mobile Wireless Services

The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of the wholesale mobile wireless services framework.

Satellite Transport Inquiry

The CRTC will undertake an inquiry to investigate satellite transport used to provide telecommunications services in Canada. Following the report, the CRTC will initiate follow-up proceedings as required.

Competitor Quality of Service

The CRTC will undertake a process to review the competitor quality of service indicators and the rate rebate plan for competitors to ensure alignment with the overall wholesale services framework.

Competitor Quality of Service

The CRTC will implement new indicators as required and a revised rate rebate plan, if applicable, following the review.

Basic Telecommunications ServicesFootnote 3

The CRTC will initiate a comprehensive review to determine what services (e.g. voice and broadband) are required by all Canadians to fully participate in the digital economy and whether there should be changes to the subsidy regime and national contribution mechanism.

Basic Telecommunications Services

The CRTC will conduct, by means of a public hearing, a comprehensive review to determine what services (e.g. voice and broadband) are required by all Canadians to fully participate in the digital economy and whether there should be changes to the subsidy regime and national contribution mechanism.

Basic Telecommunications Services

The CRTC will implement new measures, if any, following the review.

Numbering Resources

The CRTC will review the Canadian telephone numbering system to ensure that service providers continue to have access to the appropriate numbering resources required to serve Canadians.

Numbering Resources

The CRTC will implement new regulatory measures, if any, following the review.

Internet Protocol (IP) Voice Network Interconnection

The CRTC will review the status of IP voice network interconnection between network operators to support the development of next generation networks.

Broadband Performance Measurement

In collaboration with partners, the CRTC will launch a national broadband performance measurement program to ensure that Canadians have an informed picture as to the state of broadband performance in Canada. Results will assist in better understanding any limitations that exist in providing innovative new services to Canadians.

Broadband Performance Measurement

The CRTC will expand the measurement program, as appropriate, to include newer technologies such as satellite and wireless used by some Internet service providers to serve rural and remote areas, and secondary Internet service providers (competitors using wholesale services) as well as satellite and fixed wireless Internet service providers. Results from the previous year’s testing will be published.

Broadband Performance Measurement

The CRTC will continue to expand measurement program participation and technologies, as appropriate. The CRTC will also examine options for future phases of testing (e.g. wireless broadband) in collaboration with wireless carriers. Results from the previous year’s testing will be published.

Payphones

The results of the fact finding exercise initiated by Notice of Consultation (2013-337) to collect information on the current role that payphones play in the Canadian communications system, including the extent to which Canadians rely on payphones, and the effects, if any, that further payphone removals and possible rate increases may have on Canadians, will be issued and a follow-up process undertaken as required.

Payphones

The CRTC will complete any follow-up processes and monitor implementation.

Fees for Paper Bills

The CRTC will issue the results of the fact finding exercise and publish decision regarding the practice by some telecommunication service providers to charge a fee for receiving paper bills.

Accessibility of Mobile Wireless Handsets

The CRTC will review the information provided by the industry and external research, on the ability for consumers with disabilities to access mobile wireless handsets. The need to establish a formal framework will be considered, and consultations may be held. A public process may follow.

Accessibility of Mobile Wireless Handsets

The CRTC will initiate a process to modify existing requirements or develop a new regulatory framework, if necessary.

Video Relay Services

The CRTC will implement the provision of Video Relay Services so that Canadians with hearing or speech disabilities who use sign language can communicate with voice telephone users by means of a relay operator. A public process will be held regarding the details of operation and administration.

Video Relay Services

The CRTC will provide oversight of the administration of the Video Relay Services, and will monitor contributions to the Video Relay Services through the National Contribution Fund.

Video Relay Services

The CRTC will continue to monitor all aspects of the Video Relay Services.

Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS) Review

Further to the requirement that telecommunication service providers participate in the CCTS, which expires in December 2015, the CRTC will review the mandate and operation of the CCTS.

Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS) Review

The CRTC will monitor implementation of decisions taken.

Mobile Wireless Data Billing Practices

The CRTC will examine whether there is undue preference in the billing practices of certain mobile wireless service providers when offering mobile television services to their customers.

Protect

CRTC Priority

  • Strengthening the security and safety of Canadians within the communications system
'Protect' activities for the next three years
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17

Enhancements to 9-1-1 Services

The CRTC will report on the findings of the public consultation on matters related to emergency 9-1-1 services.

The CRTC will also identify, prioritize, and initiate the implementation of initiatives aimed at enhancing existing 9-1-1 services across Canada, such as improved location accuracy of wireless callers during an emergency. This will ensure that more Canadians have effective access to 9-1-1 services.

Enhancements to 9-1-1 Services

The CRTC will continue to implement initiatives to enhance existing 9-1-1 services across Canada. The CRTC will also initiate a comprehensive examination of next generation 9-1-1 services in Canada exploring other means by which Canadians could request and receive emergency assistance, such as text, video, and images.

Regulatory Framework for Next Generation 9-1-1 Services

The CRTC will undertake, by means of a public hearing, a comprehensive examination of next generation 9-1-1 services in Canada. This process will result in a policy and regulatory framework for next generation 9-1-1 services that meet the evolving public safety needs of Canadians.

Emergency Alerting

The CRTC will implement regulations and update exemption orders and conditions of licence to require the broadcasting industry’s participation in the emergency alerting system. The CRTC will monitor broadcast industry participation and if needed, take enforcement measures.

The CRTC will assist in the development of technical standards to enable Canadians to receive location-based emergency messages on their wireless devices. These measures will contribute to ensuring that Canadians receive timely warnings of imminent peril to life and property.

Emergency Alerting

The CRTC will monitor the broadcasting and telecommunication industries’ participation in the emergency alerting system and may take further measures as required to ensure participation.

Emergency Alerting

The CRTC will monitor participation in the emergency alerting system as well as developments in technology.

Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL) Compliance and Outreach

The Spam Reporting Centre will become operational.

Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules

The CRTC will implement its decision regarding unsolicited telecommunications rules. The CRTC will also raise awareness of the outcome and impacts of the decision to the industry and Canadians.

Permanent Number Registration

The CRTC will implement its decision concerning Permanent Number Registration. The CRTC will also raise awareness of the outcomes and impacts of the decision to the industry and Canadians.

Permanent Number Registration

The CRTC will continue ongoing outreach to inform Canadians.

Wireless Code

The CRTC will create a compliance framework that includes identification of systemic non-compliance issues by monitoring trends in complaints, and will act on non-compliance using existing CRTC powers and mechanisms.

Wireless Code

The CRTC will prepare for a review of the ongoing effectiveness of the Code, including assessing impacts on the marketplace and identifying potential gaps in the Code.

Wireless Code

The CRTC will review the Wireless Code through a public process and ensure continuing compliance with the Code.

Caller ID Spoofing

The CRTC will work with international and industry partners to identify options to reduce caller ID spoofing.

Caller ID Spoofing

The CRTC will work with international and industry partners to implement options to reduce caller ID spoofing.

Caller ID Spoofing

The CRTC will continue to work with international and industry partners to implement options to reduce caller ID spoofing.

Management Excellence

CRTC Priority

  • Building a high-performing organization
'Management Excellence' activities for the next three years
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17

Financial Systems

The CRTC will develop a management action plan to respond to the recommendations identified in an external review regarding the CRTC’s system of internal controls.

Financial Systems

The CRTC will identify and implement a risk-based strategy to monitor and will continue to adhere to the requirements of the Policy on Internal Controls.

Financial Systems

The CRTC will support ongoing implementation of a risk-based strategy to monitor and will continue to adhere to the requirements of the Policy on Internal Controls.

Investment Plan

The CRTC will update the CRTC Investment Plan 2014-15 to 2018-19.

Investment Plan

The CRTC will update the CRTC Investment Plan 2015-16 to 2019-20.

Investment Plan

The CRTC will update the CRTC Investment Plan 2016-17 to 2020-21.

Organizational Review

The CRTC will identify and implement measures that will contribute to reducing the CRTC’s annual operating costs by at least 5% by 2015, and will consider, where appropriate, re-investment or reallocation opportunities in its ongoing operations.

Organizational Review

The CRTC will implement proposals brought forward through review.

Organizational Review

The CRTC will implement proposals brought forward through review.

Values and Ethics

The CRTC will review the Public Service Employee Survey 2014 results and update the CRTC’s values and Ethics program and the Code of Conduct.

The CRTC will also implement and document a process for managing disclosures of wrong-doing, including investigations.

Values and Ethics

The CRTC will review, and if necessary, update the CRTC’s Code of Conduct.

Values and Ethics

The CRTC will review, and if necessary, update the CRTC’s Code of Conduct.

IM/IT Strategic Plan

The CRTC will update the IM/IT Strategic Plan annually.

IM/IT Strategic Plan

The CRTC will update the IM/IT Strategic Plan annually.

IM/IT Strategic Plan

The CRTC will update the IM/IT Strategic Plan annually.

Security and Business Continuity

The CRTC will update the plans annually. The CRTC will also implement and test the Information Management / Information Technology Disaster Recovery Plan.

Security and Business Continuity

The CRTC will test and update the plans annually.

Security and Business Continuity

The CRTC will test and update the plans annually.

Employee Development

The CRTC will provide employees with the basic principles of management excellence by offering courses on strategic thinking, creativity and innovation, values and ethics, and respect in the workplace. The CRTC will also implement the Treasury Board Secretariat’s new Policy on Performance Management.

Employee Development

The CRTC will review the strategic objectives, the Three-Year Plan, the Human Resources Plan, the Performance Management Program, and employee learning plans to identify new learning requirements.

The CRTC will also review the existing offerings to ensure they continue to meet its objectives.

Employee Development

The CRTC will review the strategic objectives, the Three-Year Plan, the Human Resources Plan, the Performance Management Program and employee learning plans to identify new learning requirements. The CRTC will also review the existing offerings to ensure they continue to meet its objectives.

Industry Monitoring and Reporting

The CRTC will continue to collect data from licensees and publish annual financial summaries for conventional television, pay, pay-per-view and specialty television, broadcast distribution and commercial radio. The CRTC will also continue to publish an annual aggregate financial summary for several large broadcast groups and consider options for enhancing the disclosure of data from large broadcasting groups. The CRTC will continue to publish the annual Communications Monitoring Report which contains disaggregated data on the Canadian broadcasting and telecommunication service industries and markets.

Industry Monitoring and Reporting

The CRTC will continue to review and enhance monitoring and reporting, to ensure that the data is collected in a relevant, timely and appropriate manner to remain responsive to emerging issues in the communication industry.

Industry Monitoring and Reporting

The CRTC will continue to review and enhance monitoring and reporting, to ensure that the data is collected in a relevant, timely and appropriate manner to remain responsive to emerging issues in the communication industry.

The CRTC’s Digital Presence

The CRTC will enhance its digital presence by leveraging multiple digital platforms to facilitate real-time discussions between the CRTC and Canadians on issues that are meaningful to them. The CRTC will also update its website’s structure and organization so that content is presented in a clear manner that is accessible and usable by all Canadians.

The CRTC’s Digital Presence

The CRTC will continue to enhance and leverage its digital presence and begin to measure its efforts. The CRTC will also continue to update its website’s structure and organization so that content is presented in a clear manner that is accessible and usable by all Canadians.

The CRTC’s Digital Presence

The CRTC will continue to enhance its digital presence by placing a strong focus on the measurement of its digital efforts to ensure the CRTC continues to engage with Canadians’ and to meet their information needs.

Consumer Lens

The CRTC will review the first year of implementation of its Consumer Lens, an analytical tool used to enhance its ability to understand and consider the interests and perspectives of consumers in all aspects of its work. Following the review, changes will be implemented as required to maximize effectiveness.

Strategic Planning

The CRTC will implement and continue to enhance results-based integrated annual planning and reporting processes and products.

Strategic Planning

The CRTC will refine planning and reporting processes and produce outputs of high quality that meet evolving needs. Resources will be well aligned with the strategic goals of the organization.

Strategic Planning

Enhanced strategic planning processes and products will be well established by the CRTC to produce outputs of high quality. Resources will be well aligned with the strategic goals of the organization.

Outreach and Collaboration

The CRTC will reach out to other government departments and agencies, non-government organizations and academia on strategic research and related initiatives with the goal of strengthening communication and building partnerships. The CRTC will seek to broaden participation in its processes through this outreach and by building on its engagement approaches to provide Canadians with opportunities to share their views.

Outreach and Collaboration

The CRTC will work with other government departments and agencies, non-government organizations, and academia on strategic research and related initiatives.

Outreach and Collaboration

The CRTC will continue to work with other government departments and agencies, non-government organizations, and academia on strategic research and related initiatives.

International Activities

The CRTC will continue to work closely with Canadian counterparts and international law enforcement agencies; participate in working groups, as well as research activities by the International Telecommunications Union, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the International Institute of Communications; and continue to develop strategic international and domestic partnerships.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Initiatives set out in the 2013-16 Three-Year Plan that will be considered with the Public Consultation on Television include: Review of Policies for Genre Protection, Category “A” Specialty Services and Ethnic Broadcasting.

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Footnote 2

The activity described as “New Wholesale High-speed Access Services” in the 2013 Plan has been subsumed by this activity.

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Footnote 3

The activity was described as “Enhanced Basic Service Objective” in the 2013 Three-Year Plan.

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