CRTC Three-Year Plan 2015-2018

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Who we are and what we do

What does it mean to be an administrative tribunal?

The CRTC is a specialized government agency that was established under federal legislation to develop, implement, and enforce regulatory policies on the Canadian communications system. The CRTC performs a wide range of functions, including rule making and policy development, but also has the quasi-judicial powers of a superior court with respect to the production and examination of evidence and the enforcement of its decisions.     

Administrative tribunals operate at arm’s length from the federal government; however, the CRTC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. The CRTC’s operations are subject to the Government of Canada’s policies and guidelines, which aim to ensure management excellence and accountability to Canadians.

 Regulatory principles

  • The CRTC works to intervene specifically in situations where market forces alone cannot achieve the policy objectives set out within its legislative mandate;
  • The CRTC  strives to ensure that its processes and decisions are informed and evidence-based; and
  • The CRTC consults widely with relevant stakeholders to assess the impact of regulatory action before imposing regulation in a given market.

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an administrative tribunal within the Government of Canada that is responsible for regulating and supervising Canada’s communication system in the public interest.

The CRTC operates under a number of legislative authorities and Acts of Parliament. These include the following: the CRTC Act; the Bell Canada Act; the Broadcasting Act; the Telecommunications Act; Canada’s anti-spam legislation; and the Canada Elections Act, which includes provisions to establish the new Voter Contact Registry.

At the heart of our mandate is the duty to serve the public interest by putting Canadians at the centre of the communications system. To this end, our role encompasses consulting Canadians on communications issues of importance to them, dealing with the many applications we receive by making decisions and rules, responding to enquiries and complaints, as well as reporting to Canadians on the progress and outcomes of our work. The CRTC promotes and enforces compliance with its regulatory policies and decisions. It encourages and facilitates industry co-regulation and self-regulation through consultations, committees, and working groups with various industry stakeholders. The CRTC also plays a key role in resolving industry disputes. Finally, in the current dynamic and evolving communications environment, the CRTC collaborates with various domestic and international stakeholders to leverage capacity and intelligence on a host of interrelated policy issues and questions. 

The CRTC’s strategic framework

The  CRTC’s strategic framework

Guided by its legislative mandate, the CRTC seeks to ensure that Canadians have access to a world-class communications system. This overarching objective is supported by three pillars —create, connect, and protect— and is rooted in a commitment to management excellence.

CREATE

The CRTC’s activities under this pillar contribute to a broadcasting system that provides Canadians with a wealth of compelling and diverse content that reflects the attitudes, opinions, ideas, values and artistic creativity of Canadians and enables their participation in the country’s democratic and cultural life.
Ongoing activities include the following:

  • analyzing various applications for the issuance, renewal and amendment of licences for broadcasting undertakings;
  • issuing Canadian program certification to independent Canadian program producers for TV productions;
  • monitoring the programming and financial performance of broadcasting undertakings to ensure compliance with regulations and conditions of licence; and,
  • approving mergers, acquisitions and changes of ownership of broadcasting undertakings.

CONNECT

The CRTC’s activities under this pillar contribute to a communications system that provides Canadians – including persons with disabilities – with quality and affordable communications service options. The communications system strengthens the social and economic fabric of Canada, and enables Canadians to have access to compelling and diverse Canadian content.
Ongoing activities include the following:

  • ensuring adherence to rules and policies, including those related to competition, quality of service, and Internet traffic management practices;
  • developing a framework to maximize choice for viewers and to foster a healthy, dynamic television market;
  • addressing applications related to the rates, terms, or conditions of services, including applications to refrain from rate regulation;
  • managing the use of telephone numbers in Canada;
  • managing a contribution and subsidy regime that supports basic residential local services in rural and remote areas;
  • resolving industry disputes and complaints through both formal Commission processes and staff-assisted dispute resolution; and,
  • coordinating the activities of the CRTC Interconnection Steering Committee, which assists the CRTC in developing information, procedures, and guidelines concerning various regulatory activities.

PROTECT

The CRTC’s activities under this pillar contribute to the protection and safety of Canadians within the communication system. By promoting and enforcing compliance with legislation and regulatory measures, the CRTC strengthens the participation of communication service providers in offering safety-enhancing services to Canadians, and seeks to reduce unsolicited commercial communication messages.
Ongoing activities include the following:

  • promoting and monitoring compliance with the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules (UTRs), Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL), and the Voter Contact Registry (VCR);
  • promoting compliance with CASL and the UTRs, including the National Do Not Call List (DNCL), and investigating alleged cases of non-compliance;
  • investigating and responding to non-compliance with the UTRs, CASL, and the VCR by means of enforcement actions;
  • monitoring industry compliance with rules regarding the loudness of TV commercials in response to public complaints;
  • monitoring industry compliance with respect to stolen wireless handsets by assessing and publishing annual progress reports from the wireless industry;
  • working with domestic and international enforcement and regulatory agencies to enhance information sharing, and coordinating operational responses to non-compliance;
  • monitoring the effectiveness of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations payable to the DNCL operator; and
  • conducting outreach and awareness initiatives so consumers can make informed choices and take measures to protect themselves, and improving industry awareness of requirements.

Underlying the work related to each of the pillars is a commitment to MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE.
Ongoing activities include the following:

  • consulting and informing Canadians, as well as responding to their inquiries and complaints through a variety of traditional and innovative communications channels;
  • organizing Commission meetings, public hearings, and public processes;
  • issuing notices, orders, and decisions;
  • managing financial resources, including broadcasting licence fees, telecommunications fees, and telemarketing fees;
  • managing internal human resources, accommodation services, and security;
  • managing information technology and information management, including administering requests submitted pursuant to the Access to Information Act;
  • monitoring and reporting on Canada’s communications system, including publishing the Communications Monitoring Report and the Report on the Operation of the National DNCL;
  • corporate planning and reporting, including reports to Parliament and the Annual Report on Official Languages to the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages;
  • facilitating industry co-regulation and self-regulation through consultations, committees, and working groups;
  • collaborating with domestic and international partners on communications issues; and,
  • providing legal services.

Purpose of the Three-Year Plan

Participation in CRTC proceedings

Your input helps the CRTC assess, update, and evaluate its policies. The CRTC welcomes your participation by sending your ideas, opinions, and comments through its various intervention processes.  For more information on how to participate, please go to It’s Your CRTC.

The plan provides a rolling three-year horizon of key CRTC activities. The document is intended to provide Canadians, industry, and other interested stakeholders and groups with important information to prepare for and participate in the CRTC’s public processes. The plan also provides a status update on the activities that the CRTC committed to in the previous year (2014-15). The communications environment is very dynamic. Accordingly, the CRTC may need to adjust its plan to respond to emerging issues.

Status Report on 2014-15 Activities

Create – Modernizing the regulatory framework for the Canadian broadcasting system

Activites that the CRTC commited to for 2014-15 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2014-2017 that are:

Ongoing activity Public Consultation on Television In 2013, the CRTC launched Let’s Talk TV. The goal was to engage Canadians to help design a forward-looking framework for Canada’s television system.  After conducting three rounds of consultations and receiving and examining over 13,000 interventions from Canadians, industry, and other interested stakeholders, the CRTC will now begin implementation of the revised regulatory framework. The first decisions were released on the elimination of the 30-day cancellation policy for broadcasting distribution undertakings, simultaneous substitution, and over-the-air broadcasting. In March 2015, the CRTC set out its policy on building a future system that encourages the creation of compelling and diverse programming made by Canadians that facilitates and leads into the transition to an increasingly on-demand environment. The CRTC also set out its policies relating to consumer choice and affordability, as well as consumer information and recourse. These measures are discussed below under the Connect and Protect pillars.
Ongoing activity Commercial Radio Policy In the fall of 2014, the CRTC issued its modified Commercial Radio Policy, in which it made the regulatory framework for commercial radio more efficient and easier to administer. The CRTC has since started to implement its modified Policy by adopting a revised approach to calls for radio applications, a new process for low-power stations, and new mechanisms to deal with non-compliance, such as permitting licensees to innovate and experimenting with hybrid digital (HD) radio technology.
Ongoing activity Ethnic radio licensing The CRTC undertook a targeted review of its Ethnic Policy for radio services to address specific issues of this particular media. The consultation process was completed in 2014.  
Completed activity Vertical integration framework In September 2014, the CRTC announced amendments to the Broadcasting Distribution Regulations (i.e. the Pay Television Regulations, Specialty Services Regulations, and the Television Broadcasting Regulations), which require companies to safeguard against the misuse of competitively sensitive information, thus providing a more conducive environment to the negotiation of terms for the distribution, packaging, and retailing of programming services. The CRTC also introduced changes to its audit requirements to clarify how audits of subscribers’ information held by companies should be conducted by programming services.
Completed activity Tangible benefits policy The CRTC issued a decision on the methodology for determining tangible benefits and the value of the transaction in September 2014. This new approach provides additional guidance so that the benefits proposed by applicants for change in ownership transactions will yield measurable improvements to the communities served by the Canadian broadcasting system.
Completed activity

Renewal of Roger’s television licences

The CRTC undertook a process to renew the licences for Rogers’ television services and speciality channels to ensure that Rogers provides programming that meets the interests of Canadians and makes appropriate contributions to the creation and broadcast of Canadian content. A short-term renewal of Rogers’ licences was issued in July 2014 to align the licence expiration date with those of other major English-language broadcast groups. The Rogers licensing process will be rolled up with other licence renewals for English-language television groups in 2015-16.

Completed activity Obligations under Part VII , section 41 of the Official Languages Act The CRTC held two discussion group meetings with official language minority communities to discuss certain issues and to inform them of CRTC processes that could affect them.

Three-Year Outlook

Create – Modernizing the regulatory framework for the Canadian broadcasting system

2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
Canadian production funds
The CRTC will conduct a public process to update policies for independent Canadian production funds to encourage the promotion of Canadian programming and remove disincentives for the development of online programming.
Canadian production funds
The CRTC will issue a decision on revising the criteria for independent production funds. The fund administrators will be required to demonstrate to the CRTC that they are operating in accordance with the revised criteria.
Canadian production funds
The CRTC will monitor compliance with the revised criteria.
Canadian children’s television
The CRTC will publish a notice of consultation to establish sub-categories of children’s programming to better measure program production, expenditures, and exhibition, thus ensuring that children’s programming is properly supported.
 Canadian children’s television
The CRTC will monitor the availability and support for children’s programming.
Canadian children’s television
The CRTC will monitor the availability and support for children’s programming.
Elimination of genre protection
The CRTC will encourage programming flexibility and domestic competition by eliminating the “genre protection” requirements for programming services as part of the licensing process.
Elimination of genre protection
The elimination of genre protection requirements will be implemented by deleting the appropriate conditions of licence during renewals.
Elimination of genre protection
The CRTC will continue to implement elimination of genre protection requirements by deleting the appropriate conditions of licence during renewals.
Licensing criteria for national news
The CRTC will implement new licensing criteria for national news services to ensure that Canadians receive high-quality news programming.
Licensing criteria for national news
The criteria will be applied to new licences and licence renewals.
Licensing criteria for national news
The CRTC will continue to apply the criteria to new licences and licence renewals.
Video-on-demand  
Pursuant to a notice of consultation issued in 2014-15, the CRTC will support the development of a revised regulatory framework for hybrid online video-on-demand services by removing barriers for Canadian companies to compete in the on-demand environment.
Video-on-demand
The CRTC will monitor the rollout, including the availability to all Canadians, of online video-on-demand services.
Video-on-demand
The CRTC will monitor the rollout, including the availability to all Canadians, of online video-on-demand services.
Exemptions orders for discretionary services
The CRTC will combine and expand the exemption orders for discretionary programming services, facilitating greater competition and increasing program flexibility.

The new exemption orders will take effect in 2015-16 through amendments to appropriate broadcasting distribution undertaking regulations.
Exemptions orders for discretionary services
The CRTC will maintain a registry of exempt services to provide Canadians with information regarding the availability and nature of programming offered by these services.
Exemptions orders for discretionary services
The CRTC will maintain a registry of exempt services to provide Canadians with information regarding the availability and nature of programming offered by these services.
Local program availabilities
The CRTC will revise the authorization for “local availabilities” to provide more opportunities for the promotion of programming created by Canadians.
Local program availabilities
The CRTC will use audits both on a random basis and in response to complaints to ensure compliance and prevent abuse.
Local program availabilities
The CRTC will use audits both on a random basis and in response to complaints to ensure compliance and prevent abuse.
Canadian content regulation
The CRTC will implement pilot projects in the area of Canadian content certification to recognize big-budget Canadian programs and programs based on best-selling novels written by Canadians.
Canadian content regulation
The CRTC will conduct pilot projects in the area of Canadian content certification to recognize big budget Canadian programs and programs based on best-selling novels written by Canadians.
Canadian content regulation
The CRTC will evaluate the success of the pilot projects after three years of operation.
Audience measurement
The CRTC will require the broadcasting industry to develop a set-top-based audience measurement system so that Canadian programming services can meet the needs and interests of viewers.
Audience measurement
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of a set-top based audience measurement system.
Audience measurement
The CRTC will assess the effectiveness of the system.
Discoverability of Canadian programs
The CRTC will hold a summit with a diverse group of participants, including government and industry stakeholders, to develop strategies and mechanisms to improve the discoverability of Canadian programs.
   
Cultural diversity policy
Based on the decisions stemming from the Let’s Talk TV proceeding, the CRTC will initiate a study on how diversity in Canada is reflected in a multi-platform broadcasting environment.
Cultural diversity policy
A fact-finding exercise may be initiated to enhance the CRTC’s understanding of the issues and perspectives related to cultural diversity.
Cultural diversity policy
The CRTC will publish the results of the fact-finding exercise and, if necessary, issue a notice of consultation to establish a revised regulatory framework.
Ethnic radio licensing
The CRTC will issue a notice of consultation to undertake a targeted review of its Ethnic Radio Policy, which is specifically designed for over-the-air radio services. As part of the review, the CRTC will respond to changes in the dynamics of ethnic communities in Canada.
Ethnic radio licensing
The CRTC will publish a revised framework for ethnic radio services.
Ethnic radio licensing
The CRTC will implement the new framework and initiate follow-up proceedings if required.
Native Radio Policy
The CRTC will conduct an internal review of its Native Radio Policy to ensure that the regulatory framework is effective and reflects the realities of radio stations serving Aboriginal peoples.
Native Radio Policy
The CRTC will issue a notice of consultation to conduct a review of the existing policy based on the issues identified in its internal review. Following the review, the CRTC will determine the appropriate public process to be undertaken. 
Native Radio Policy
The CRTC will implement and monitor the new policy.
Renewal of French-language television licences
The CRTC will issue a notice of consultation to review the licence renewal applications of the French-language television stations owned by Québecor Media Inc., Remstar Diffusion, and Télé-Québec. Through this process, the CRTC will determine whether licensees are fulfilling their current regulatory obligations, as well as their new obligations in accordance with the regulatory framework stemming from Let’s Talk TV.
Renewal of French-language television licences
The CRTC will conduct a public hearing to review the licence renewal applications of the French-language television stations owned by Québecor Media Inc., Remstar Diffusion, and Télé-Québec. A decision will be issued further to this hearing.
Renewal of French-language television licences
The CRTC will monitor and assess the effectiveness of the licensees’ new obligations.
Licence renewals for English-language television groups
The CRTC will issue a notice of consultation to renew the licences of Bell Media Inc., Shaw Media Inc., Corus Entertainment Inc. and Rogers Media Inc. Through this process, the CRTC will determine whether licensees are fulfilling their current regulatory obligations, as well as their new obligations in accordance with the regulatory framework stemming from Let’s Talk TV.
Licence renewals for English-language television groups
The CRTC will conduct a public hearing and issue a decision, in accordance with the new regulatory framework stemming from Let’s Talk TV, to ensure that licensees are providing programming that meets the interests of Canadians and making appropriate contributions to the creation and broadcast of Canadian content.
Licence renewals for English-language television groups
The CRTC will monitor and assess the effectiveness of the licensees’ new obligations.
Obligations under Part VII, section 41 of the Official Languages Act
The CRTC will hold two CRTC-official language minority communities (OLMC) discussion-group meetings as part of its ongoing commitment under the Official Languages Act.
The discussion-group meetings represent an important forum to exchange information on the needs and priorities of the OLMCs.
Obligations under Part VII, section 41 of the Official Languages Act
The CRTC will hold two CRTC-OLMC discussion-group meetings.

The CRTC will prepare and present the Results-Based Action Plan for the Department of Canadian Heritage as part of the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act.
Obligations under Part VII, section 41 of the Official Languages Act
The CRTC will hold two CRTC-OLMC discussion-group meetings.
Public consultation on local and community programmingFootnote 1
The CRTC will launch a proceeding to review its approach to local and community channel programming to ensure that appropriate policies and regulations are in place relating to locally relevant, locally reflective, and community access programming. 
Public consultation on local and community programming
The CRTC will issue a revised community channel policy and begin the process to implement the renewed framework.
Public consultation on local and community programming
The CRTC will monitor and assess the effectiveness of the renewed framework.
Review of the French-language music regulatory framework
The CRTC will conduct a series of consultations with key stakeholders in the French-language radio and music industries to uncover new and innovative solutions to support French-language music. The CRTC will then launch a proceeding to address the issues raised.
Review of the French-language music regulatory framework
The CRTC will issue a decision and implement the new regulatory framework.
Review of the French-language music regulatory framework
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of the new regulatory framework.

Status Report on 2014-15 Activities

Connect – Improving access to advanced and competitive communications services

Activites that the CRTC commited to for 2014-15 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2014-2017 that are:

Completed activity Public Consultation on Television In April 2014, the CRTC provided a response to the Governor in Council on maximizing the ability of Canadian consumers to subscribe to discretionary services on a service-by-service basis. In its response, the CRTC expressed the preliminary view that the distribution and packaging of television services should be reviewed to maximize consumer choice and flexibility. This approach was examined as part of the Let’s Talk TV proceeding.

In March 2015, as part of Let’s Talk TV, the CRTC set out its policy to give Canadians choice and control regarding the selection and packaging of their television services.  The CRTC’s approach provides incrementally greater choice and flexibility for Canadian TV viewers.  The CRTC’s approach will require broadcasting distribution undertakings (BDUs) to offer a small, affordable basic television service that gives priority to Canadian services and is capped at $25 per month. It will also require BDUs to enable Canadians to purchase discretionary programming services on a “pick-and-pay” basis and in small, reasonably priced packages. Lastly, the CRTC will establish an industry code of conduct that will clarify the terms of wholesale agreements negotiated by broadcasters and television service providers.
Completed activity Regulatory Framework and Modernization Plan for Northwestel The CRTC reviewed Northwestel Inc.’s (Northwestel) revised modernization plan to ensure that the implementation targets are being met. The CRTC issued a decision in which it approved Northwestel’s terrestrial retail Internet service rates, and mandated Northwestel to make some changes to reduce the disparity between the rates for the company’s Internet services and similar services in other areas of Canada. In a subsequent decision, the CRTC capped Northwestel’s residential Internet service rates.
Completed activity Wholesale services and associated policies The CRTC reviewed, by means of a public hearing in late 2014, wireline wholesale services (including fibre-to-the-premises facilities) and associated policies. The main goal of this review was to ensure that the wholesale services framework is facilitating the development of a competitive Canadian telecommunications market, while balancing incentives to invest in innovative networks.
Ongoing activity Wholesale mobile wireless services The CRTC held a public hearing in Fall 2014 as part of a proceeding to determine whether the wholesale mobile wireless services market (including roaming, and tower- and site-sharing services) is sufficiently competitive and, if not, what regulatory measures are required.
Completed activity Satellite transport inquiry Further to the inquiry conducted by the inquiry officer to investigate satellite transport services used to provide telecommunications services in Canada the Inquiry Officer delivered her findings in a report to Commissioners in Fall 2014.

On April 9, 2015 the CRTC published the report of the Inquiry Officer.
Ongoing activity Basic telecommunications services The CRTC prepared for its review to determine which basic services (e.g. voice and broadband) are required by all Canadians to fully participate in the digital economy, and whether there should be changes to the subsidy regime and the national contribution mechanism.
Completed activity Broadband performance measurement In collaboration with several Internet service providers, the CRTC launched a national broadband performance measurement program to help inform Canadians of the state of broadband performance in Canada. In addition, the CRTC launched a campaign to identify and recruit individual Canadians to participate in the testing and measurement of broadband services.
Completed activity Payphones To help Canadians better understand the role that payphones play in the Canadian communications system, the CRTC published the results of its fact-finding exercise and launched two further processes on this issue.
Completed activity Fees for paper bills Following a fact-finding exercise, the CRTC hosted a meeting with the 11 largest communications service providers in Canada to facilitate a discussion on establishing a clear and predictable approach that addresses consumer issues related to paper bill fees.

In December 2014, changes to the Telecommunications Act and the Broadcasting Act were introduced to prohibit communications service providers from charging customers a fee to receive paper bills for their wireless, Internet, telephone, and television services.
Completed activity Accessibility of mobile wireless handsets The CRTC has reviewed industry information, external research, and the results of compliance reports in relation to the Wireless Code.
Completed activity Video relay services In December 2014, the CRTC published two decisions that advance the operations of video relay services (VRS) in Canada to ensure that Canadians with hearing or speech disabilities who use sign language can communicate with voice telephone users by means of a relay operator.
Completed activity Wholesale mobile wireless data billing practices The CRTC issued a decision in January 2015 in which it found that Bell Mobility Inc. and Videotron G.P. had violated the Telecommunications Act by exempting their mobile TV services from data charges.

Three-Year Outlook

Connect – Improving access to advanced and competitive communications services

2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
Pick and pay options
By March 2016, the CRTC will require broadcasting distribution undertakings (BDUs) to enable Canadians to purchase discretionary programming services on either a “pick-and-pay” basis or in small, reasonably priced packages.

The CRTC will take action to amend applicable regulations.
Pick and pay options
By December 2016, the CRTC will require BDUs to enable Canadians to purchase discretionary programming services on both a “pick and pay” basis and in small, reasonably priced packages.

The CRTC will monitor industry compliance in offering a la carte and small, reasonably priced packages.
Pick and pay options
The CRTC will review and evaluate whether services are being offered to Canadians in reasonably priced  packages.
Basic service options
The CRTC will require BDUs to offer a small, affordable, basic television service that gives priority to Canadian services and is capped at $25 per month.

The CRTC will take action to amend applicable regulations.
Basic service options
The CRTC will monitor industry compliance in offering small, affordable basic television services.
Basic service options
The CRTC will monitor industry compliance in offering small, affordable basic television services.
Industry code of conduct
Pursuant to a notice of consultation issued in 2014-15, the CRTC will amend applicable regulations for all licensed BDUs to enable the implementation of a code of conduct that governs negotiations between programming services and BDUs.
Industry code of conduct
The CRTC will consider complaints pursuant to the code as they arise.
Industry code of conduct
The CRTC will consider complaints pursuant to the code as they arise.
Amendments to exemption order for BDUs with under 20,000 subscribers
In April 2015, the CRTC issued a notice of consultation in which it proposed to expand the exemption order for BDUs with under 20,000 subscribers to allow them to compete in larger markets.
Amendments to exemption order for BDUs with under 20,000 subscribers
The CRTC will maintain a registry of these exempt services.
Amendments to exemption order for BDUs with under 20,000 subscribers
The CRTC will maintain a registry of these exempt services.
Modernization plan for Northwestel
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of Northwestel’s network modernization plan.  
Regulatory framework and modernization plan for Northwestel
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of Northwestel’s network modernization plan.

The CRTC will initiate a review of Northwestel’s regulatory framework.
Regulatory framework and modernization plan for Northwestel
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of Northwestel’s network modernization plan.

The CRTC will conclude its review of Northwestel’s regulatory framework, issue a decision, and then implement new regulatory measures, if any.
Wholesale services and associated policies 
The CRTC will issue a decision regarding the review of wholesale wireline services (including fibre-to-the-premises facilities) and associated policies. The CRTC will then implement new regulatory measures, if any, and initiate follow-up proceedings as required.
Wholesale services and associated policies 
The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of the wholesale wireline services framework.
Wholesale services and associated policies 
The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of the wholesale wireline services framework.
Wholesale mobile wireless services
The CRTC will issue a decision regarding its review of wholesale mobile wireless services.

The CRTC will then implement new regulatory measures, if any, and initiate follow-up proceedings as required.
Wholesale mobile wireless services
The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of the wholesale mobile wireless services framework.
Wholesale mobile wireless services
The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of the wholesale mobile wireless services framework.
Review of Telesat’s Satellite Price Ceiling
The price ceiling regulatory framework for Telesat’s C-band fixed satellite services had not been reviewed since it was put in place in 1999.

The CRTC will conduct a review of the current price ceiling and other related matters for Telesat’s C-band fixed satellite services used to provide telecommunications services in Canada.
Review of Telesat’s Satellite Price Ceiling
The CRTC will implement new regulatory measures, if any.
 
Competitor quality of service
The CRTC will undertake a process to review the competitor quality of service indicators and the rate rebate plan for competitors to ensure alignment with the wholesale services framework.
Competitor quality of service
The CRTC will implement new indicators, as required, and a revised rate rebate plan, if applicable. 
Competitor quality of service
The CRTC will monitor competitor quality of service indicators.
Basic telecommunications services 
The CRTC will conduct a review that will examine which telecommunications services (e.g. voice and broadband) are required by all Canadians to meaningfully participate in the digital economy, and the CRTC’s role in ensuring the availability of affordable basic telecommunications services to all Canadians.

The CRTC will review its policies regarding basic telecommunications services in Canada. In addition, the CRTC will gather information from the industry and seek the views of Canadians to better understand which telecommunications services are being offered across Canada and whether any areas in Canada are underserved or unserved. The CRTC will also examine whether there should be changes to the subsidy regime and the national contribution mechanism.
Basic telecommunications services
The CRTC will conclude its review, including an oral public hearing, and issue a decision.

The CRTC will then implement new regulatory measures, if any, and initiate follow-up proceedings, as required.
Basic telecommunications services
The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of any new regulatory measures, if any.
Internet Protocol (IP) voice network interconnection
In 2012, the CRTC established a set of principles to facilitate IP voice network interconnection between network operators to support the development of next-generation networks.

The CRTC will gather evidence and conduct a fact-finding exercise to determine the extent to which telecommunications service providers have implemented IP voice network interconnection in Canada. 
Internet Protocol (IP) voice network interconnection
The CRTC will conduct a process to review the status of IP voice network interconnection between network operators.
Internet Protocol (IP) voice network interconnection
The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of any new regulatory measures, if any.
Broadband performance measurement
The CRTC will continue its national broadband performance measurement program, and explore options for extending the testing of broadband measurement beyond the initial partners to include other Internet service providers (ISPs).

In addition, the CRTC will publish a report on the program, which will include its findings from individual Canadians who participated in the testing of broadband measurement. 
Broadband performance measurement
The CRTC will continue to expand broadband performance measurement program participation and technologies, as required. The CRTC will also undertake preliminary discussions with the wireless industry to explore methodologies that could be used to assess or enhance mobile network performance.

Results from the previous year’s testing will be published in the Communications Monitoring Report and/or in a stand-alone report prepared by the testing vendor.
Broadband performance measurement
In collaboration with wireless carriers, and depending on the results of feasibility testing, the CRTC may extend the broadband performance measurement program to include wireless broadband service providers.

Results from the previous year’s testing will be published in the Communications Monitoring Report and/or in a stand-alone report prepared by the testing vendor. In addition, other mechanisms for releasing data for public use will be explored.
Payphones
To ensure that Canadians are well informed regarding payphones within their respective communities, the CRTC will publish its decisions on the definition of a “community” and the existing safeguards related to non-cash payphone calls.
   
Accessibility of mobile wireless handsets
The CRTC will convene a meeting of technical experts to advance its understanding of the availability and accessibility of mobile wireless handsets for consumers with disabilities. A process may be initiated to either modify the existing regulatory framework or to develop a new regulatory framework, if necessary.
Accessibility of mobile wireless handsets
The CRTC will take necessary action to implement its determinations regarding the regulatory framework for the accessibility of mobile wireless handsets.
Accessibility of mobile wireless handsets
The CRTC will monitor industry implementation of and compliance with the regulatory framework regarding the accessibility of mobile wireless handsets.
Video Relay Services
As per the decisions published in 2014, the CRTC will review the Annual Report and budget proposal submitted by the Video Relay Service (VRS) administrator.
Video Relay Services
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of VRS in Canada on an ongoing basis by reviewing the annual report and the budget proposal submitted by the VRS administrator. The CRTC will also monitor complaints received from the public.

In addition, the CRTC will support educational and outreach initiatives to increase awareness of VRS.
 
Message Relay Services
The CRTC will review the appropriateness of its regulatory framework for Message Relay Services (MRS).

MRS enables people with hearing or speech disabilities to communicate with voice telephone users via text messages.  
 Message Relay Services
The CRTC will implement a revised regulatory framework for MRS, if necessary.
Message Relay Services
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of the regulatory framework for MRS on an ongoing basis.

Note: The “Numbering Resources” activity included in the CRTC’s Three-Year Plan 2014-17 has been removed. In January 2015, the CRTC approved guidelines to allow non-geographic numbering resources to be used for machine-to-machine communication services.

Status Report on 2014-15 Activities

Protect – Strengthening the security and safety of Canadians within the communications system

Activites that the CRTC commited to for 2014-15 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2014-2017 that are:

Completed activity Public Consultation on Television In March 2015, as part of Let’s Talk TV, the CRTC put in place a system that will help Canadians make informed choices and have recourse where issues arise.  These measures include creation of a new Television Service Provider (TVSP) Code of Conduct and identification of an independent ombudsman.  The proposed code would require companies to provide better customer services, easy-to-understand agreements, and notification of changes to services.  These measures also ensure that Canadians with disabilities will have access to more content that has been adapted to their needs.
Completed activity Enhancements to 9-1-1 services Following a public consultation, the CRTC issued its 9-1-1 Action Plan in June 2014. This plan includes key initiatives aimed at enhancing Canadians’ access to existing 9-1-1 services and facilitating the transition to next-generation 9-1-1 services.
Completed activity Emergency alerting The CRTC implemented regulations, and updated exemption orders and conditions of licence to require the broadcasting industry’s participation in the emergency alerting system. The vast majority of the broadcasting industry successfully implemented emergency alerting in their systems.
Completed activity Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) compliance and outreach The Spam Reporting Centre (SRC) was operational when CASL came into force in July 2014. Approximately 35,000 Canadians have made 250,000 submissions to the SRC and contributed to the launch of investigations. Communications activities were undertaken to inform Canadians about CASL and how they can report to the SRC. The CRTC also conducted cross-country outreach activities with stakeholders to promote compliance with CASL provisions. Investigations launched after 1 July 2014 led to the issuance of warning letters, notices of violation and administrative monetary penalties.
Completed activity Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules The CRTC implemented its decision with respect to the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules (UTRs), conducted outreach activities, and creates communications products to promote compliance with the UTRs and to educate Canadians on their regulatory protections. In addition, the CRTC issued warning letters, citations, notices of violation, and administrative monetary penalties to telemarketers who violated the UTRs.
Completed activity Permanent number registration for the National Do Not Call List (DNCL) The CRTC implemented its decision on permanent number registration, in which it eliminated the finite registration period for telecommunications numbers on the National DNCL. Communications activities were undertaken to inform Canadians that they no longer need to renew or re-register their numbers.
Completed activity Wireless Code The CRTC created an Implementation Report Card that summarizes the extent to which each wireless service provider has complied with the Wireless Code, based on compliance reports filed by wireless service providers in 2014. The CRTC also liaised with the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS) on a regular basis to assess emerging issues, monitor complaint data, and determine if further action is required. In addition, the CRTC conducted its second year of public opinion research to measure awareness of the Code.
Completed activity Caller ID spoofing The CRTC hosted a workshop in which it collaborated with representatives from domestic and international service providers, as well as regulatory and law enforcement agencies, to explore options for reducing caller ID spoofing. The CRTC, in collaboration with partners, created an initiative on tracking telemarketing calls to unassigned phone numbers (honeypots), and analyzed data to select cases that required enforcement. The CRTC also researched methods of identifying spoofed calls and explored a calling feature that would improve Canadians’ ability to report spoofed calls.
Completed activity Voter Contact Registry The CRTC established a Voter Contact Registry (VCR) and undertook communications activities to inform relevant persons, groups, and service providers of their obligations when contacting voters during election periods. Following a public consultation process, the CRTC issued a decision in which it identified the factors to be considered in the issuance of administrative monetary penalties to those in violation of the VCR rules. The CRTC also issued an information bulletin that sets out the process and requirements for registration in the VCR.

Three-Year Outlook

Protect – Strengthening the security and safety of Canadians within the communications system

2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
Consumer Television Service Provider Code
Pursuant to a notice of consultation issued in 2014-15, the CRTC will create and implement a Television Service Provider Code for consumers to ensure that Canadians are informed of the options and recourse available where issues arise.

The code is expected to be administered by the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS).
Consumer Television Service Provider Code
The CRTC will monitor the activities of the CCTS to ensure the effectiveness of the code.
Consumer Television Service Provider Code
The CRTC will monitor the activities of the CCTS to ensure the effectiveness of the code.
Regulatory framework for next-generation 9-1-1 servicesFootnote 2
Pursuant to the 9-1-1 Action Plan that the CRTC issued in 2014, the CRTC will initiate a comprehensive examination of next-generation    9-1-1 services in Canada and explore other means by which Canadians could request and receive emergency assistance, such as through text messages, videos, and images.
Regulatory framework for next generation 9-1-1 services
The CRTC will undertake, by means of a public hearing, a comprehensive examination of next-generation 9-1-1 services in Canada. Issues to be considered include the roles and responsibilities of telecommunications service providers. This process will result in a policy and a regulatory framework for next-generation 9-1-1 services that meet the evolving public safety needs of Canadians.
Regulatory framework for next generation 9-1-1 services
The CRTC will implement new measures, as required, following the examination of next-generation 9-1-1 services in Canada.
Resiliency of 9-1-1 networks
The CRTC will conduct a review of the reliability and resiliency of
9-1-1 networks across Canada, and determine, among other things, whether telecommunications service providers should be required to alert 9-1-1 call centres of network outages that may affect them.
Resiliency of 9-1-1 networks
The CRTC will implement new measures, as required, and monitor their effectiveness on an ongoing basis.
 
9-1-1 caller wireless location information
The CRTC will assess the performance of wireless communications companies in providing caller location information to 9-1-1 call centres, and undertake other activities or implement measures to improve wireless caller location information.
9-1-1 caller wireless location information
The CRTC will monitor the performance of wireless communications companies in providing caller location information to 9-1-1 call centres.  
9-1-1 caller wireless location information
The CRTC will monitor the performance of wireless communications companies in providing caller location information to 9-1-1 call centres.
Emergency alerting
The CRTC will review the emergency alerting implementation reports submitted by the broadcasters in April 2015 to determine their compliance with the emergency alerting policy.
In addition, the CRTC intends to report publicly on industry participation in the fall of 2015.The CRTC will also monitor the progress of the industry’s implementation of the Wireless Public Alerting Service (WPAS) standards stemming from the Communications Interoperability Strategy for Canada.
Emergency alerting
The CRTC will monitor participation by campus, community, and native radio communication distribution undertakings in the emergency alerting system, which is required by 31 March 2016. In addition, the CRTC will report publicly on  industry participation and usage of the system in the fall of 2016.The CRTC will also monitor the wireless carrier industry’s developments with respect to the WPAS and a pilot project regarding WPAS implementation. Based on these developments, a public proceeding may be launched on WPAS.
Emergency alerting
The CRTC will continue to monitor and report on participation in the emergency alerting system and on related technological developments.

If a public proceeding regarding WPAS implementation by the wireless industry is required, the CRTC will complete this proceeding, including the establishment of policy guidelines and the implementation of timeframes for industry compliance.
Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL) - Compliance and
enforcement
The CRTC will conduct outreach activities to promote compliance with CASL, and will work to strengthen domestic and international partnerships with public and private sector organizations.  

The CRTC will investigate non-compliance with CASL, and take enforcement actions, supported by intelligence, for high-impact cases.
Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL) - Compliance and enforcement
The CRTC will continue to promote compliance with CASL through outreach activities, and will further leverage domestic and international partnerships. 

The CRTC will continue to enhance intelligence to identify and investigate non-compliance with CASL, and take enforcement actions, supported by intelligence, for high-impact cases.
Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL) - Compliance and enforcement
The CRTC will continue ongoing efforts to increase information sources and foster collaboration with partners to focus enforcement responses on high-impact cases. 
Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules - Compliance and enforcement
The CRTC will conduct outreach activities geared towards the telemarketing industry to promote compliance with the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules (UTRs), and will work to create and maintain domestic and international partnerships with other law enforcement and regulatory agencies.

The CRTC will investigate non-compliance with the UTRs and take enforcement actions, supported by intelligence, for high-impact cases. The CRTC will also examine the telemarketing industry to help identify barriers to compliance so that outreach activities can be adapted as required.
Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules -
Compliance and enforcement
The CRTC will continue to promote compliance with the UTRs through outreach activities, and will continue to maintain and build domestic and international partnerships. 

The CRTC will leverage its findings to strengthen its outreach activities geared towards the telemarketing industry.
Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules - Compliance and enforcement
The CRTC will review and update its compliance promotion approaches and will expand on its information sources to further strengthen its focus on high-impact issues and respond to emerging trends.
National Do Not Call List
To ensure the protection of Canadians’ privacy through appropriately funded compliance and enforcement activities with respect to the UTRs, the CRTC will release a decision regarding the appropriate fees for subscribing to the National DNCL.
National Do Not Call List
The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of the new fee structure for the National DNCL and establish a plan to manage the operation of the National DNCL following the termination of the contract with the current National DNCL operator in January 2018. A process will be undertaken to manage the operation of the National DNCL after that date.
National Do Not Call List
The CRTC will issue a request for proposals regarding the operation of the National DNCL after January 2018.
Permanent number registration
The CRTC will continue ongoing outreach activities to inform Canadians that adding their numbers to the National DNCL is a one-time permanent registration.
   
Voter Contact Registry
The CRTC will continue implementation of the Voter Contact Registry (VCR), including conducting outreach to Canadians, developing systems to manage complaints and cases, and initiating a compliance and enforcement program, to help protect Canadian voters from rogue and/or misleading telephone calls during an election period.
Voter Contact Registry
The CRTC will continue conducting outreach to regulated entities and Canadians. It will also continue to enforce VCR provisions and ensure compliance with them. It will assess the performance of the VCR and adjust the registry as required.
 
Wireless Code
The CRTC will prepare to review the ongoing effectiveness of the Wireless Code (the Code) by reviewing the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services’ annual report to identify potential gaps in the Code; following up with wireless service providers to update their compliance reports; and conducting public opinion research.
Wireless Code
The CRTC will review the Code, and subsequently initiate a public proceeding to explore any issues requiring further examination, or gaps in the Code that need to be addressed, to provide more comprehensive protection for Canadians.
Wireless Code
The CRTC will monitor the implementation of the revised Code and its effectiveness on an ongoing basis.
Caller ID spoofing
The CRTC will undertake outreach activities to raise Canadians’ awareness of the risks associated with caller-ID-spoofed calls, and measures they can take to protect themselves.
The CRTC will explore the feasibility of technical solutions to improve the accuracy of consumer complaints and better protect Canadians from unwanted calls, including caller-ID-spoofed calls.
Caller ID spoofing
The CRTC will continue to conduct outreach to Canadians on the risks associated with caller ID spoofing, and measures they can take to protect themselves. 
The CRTC will implement technical solutions to improve the accuracy of consumer complaints and better protect Canadians from unwanted calls, including caller-ID-spoofed calls.
Caller ID spoofing
The CRTC will expand technical solutions (e.g. honey pots) and improve analytical tools.
The CRTC will monitor the performance of technical solutions to improve the accuracy of consumer complaints and better protect Canadians from unwanted calls, including caller-ID-spoofed calls.
Loudness of commercial compliance monitoring
The CRTC will review and assess industry responses to consumer complaints, and will undertake targeted monitoring of the loudness of television commercials based on consumer complaints.

The CRTC will evaluate the industry’s compliance based on analyses conducted in the CRTC Technology Centre.
Loudness of commercial compliance monitoring
The CRTC will conduct an internal review of its current policy on monitoring compliance with, and enforcing, the loudness of commercials.  
Loudness of commercial compliance monitoring
Following the internal review, the CRTC may initiate a review of the current policy.
Enforcement of the Telecommunications Act
The CRTC has assumed new responsibilities for promoting and monitoring compliance with the Telecommunications Act, as well as its decisions and orders.

The CRTC will investigate and respond to non-compliance with a range of compliance and enforcement tools, including the issuance of administrative monetary penalties (AMPs).
Enforcement of the Telecommunications Act
The CRTC will continue to promote and monitor compliance with the Telecommunications Act, as well as its decisions and orders.
Enforcement of the Telecommunications Act
The CRTC will continue to promote, monitor, and enforce compliance with the Telecommunications Act, as well as its decisions and orders.
Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services review
The CRTC will hold a public hearing to review the CCTS’s structure and mandate, and to investigate how the CCTS could function as the ombudsman for complaints from customers of broadcasting distribution undertakings.

The CRTC will then publish the resulting decision, initiate any follow-up activities, as required, and develop an evaluation plan.
Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services review
The CRTC will monitor the effectiveness of the CCTS based on the evaluation plan on an ongoing basis.
 

Status Report on 2014-15 Priorities

Management Excellence– Building a high-performing organization

Activites that the CRTC commited to for 2014-15 in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2014-2017 that are:

Completed activity Financial systems The CRTC produced two status reports on the remediation action it took to address the internal control risks identified by Deloitte as part of the CRTC’s implementation of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s Policy on Internal Control and Internal Controls over Financial Reporting. Remediation actions have been completed or partially completed for the majority of the recommendations.
Completed activity Investment Plan The update of the CRTC’s Investment Plan for 2014-15 was approved in December 2014. In addition to providing an update to planned projects and estimated costs for 2014-15, the update provided a report on the actual project costs for 2013-14.
Completed activity Organizational review During the summer of 2014, the CRTC launched an efficiency review process to identify cost savings/cost avoidance areas and reinvestment opportunities, and to achieve the minimum 5% reduction in operating costs in future years. The CRTC achieved a reduction in operating costs of approximately 10%.
Completed activity Values and ethics The 2014 Public Service Employee Survey results were received in early February 2015, reviewed by the CRTC’s senior management, and communicated to all employees. The CRTC then approved an action plan to address the results of the survey. A new CRTC policy on the Internal Disclosure of Wrongdoing was developed and approved in January 2015. The policy was shared with all employees in February 2015.
Completed activity IM/IT Strategic Plan The CRTC updated and approved the IM/IT Strategic Plan. Actions identified in the plan, including the Record Keeping Directive, Development of Open Data Guidelines and Elaboration and Implementation of an improved process to deal with Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) requests, have been put in place.
Completed activity Security and business continuity The CRTC approved the Business Continuity Plan and the postponement protocol. The IM/IT Disaster Recovery Plan was implemented.
Completed activity Employee training The CRTC offered its employees Strategic Thinking, Creativity and Innovation, Leadership, Values and Ethics, and Towards a Respectful Workplace courses in both official languages during 2014-15.
Completed activity Industry monitoring and reporting To better reflect the CRTC’s objective of placing Canadians at the centre of the communications system, the 2014 CRTC Communications Monitoring Report featured new content of interest to Canadians, as well as a number of improvements to make the report easier and more appealing to a broader audience. The report was published in three volumes between September and October 2014.
Completed activity CRTC digital presence The CRTC improved its digital presence and citizen engagement efforts through enhancements to its social media presence and website.
Ongoing activity Consumer Lens review The CRTC developed and implemented a strategy for the review of the Consumer Lens in Fall/Winter 2014-15. This review is ongoing.
Completed activity Strategic planning The CRTC implemented new planning tools along with a corporate planning cycle. The CRTC continued to enhance its annual results-based integrated planning and reporting processes and products.
Ongoing activity Outreach and collaboration The CRTC hosted a roundtable discussion at the annual meeting of the Canadian Communication Association in June 2014, with a view to strengthen communication and collaboration with the academic community.
Completed activity International Activities The CRTC participated in the work of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Committee on Consumer Policy, and the Working Party on Communication Infrastructures and Services Policy. In addition to conducting international comparative research that contributed to key CRTC proceedings, the CRTC also shared data with the OECD and the International Telecommunications Union, received delegations from Tunisia and Hong Kong, collaborated with the International Institute of Communications, and visited foreign communication regulators to share best practices and develop partnerships.

Three-Year Outlook

Management Excellence – Building a high-performing organization

2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
Financial systems
The CRTC will address the remaining internal control risks identified by an external review team (Deloitte) in 2013. This will ensure that an effective risk-based system of internal controls is in place at the CRTC and is properly maintained, monitored, and reviewed, and that timely corrective measures are taken when issues are identified.
Financial systems
The CRTC will implement a risk-based strategy to monitor and adhere to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s Policy on Internal Control  
Financial systems
The CRTC will continue the ongoing implementation of a risk-based strategy to monitor and adhere to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s Policy on Internal Control
Investment Plan
The CRTC will draft an update of the Investment Plan, including a report on actual expenses for projects conducted in 2014-15 and projects planned for 2015-16.
Investment Plan
The CRTC will update and approve the CRTC Investment Plan for 2016-17 to 2020-21.

The CRTC will prepare and submit a formal comprehensive investment plan to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat in 2016.
Investment Plan
The CRTC will conduct an internal update of the Investment Plan, including projects planned for 2017-18, and a report on actual expenses for projects conducted in 2016-17. 
Values and ethics
The CRTC will review annually, and if necessary, update its Code of Conduct and its values and ethics training program.
Values and ethics
The CRTC will review annually, and if necessary, update its Code of Conduct and its values and ethics training program.
Values and ethics
The CRTC will review annually, and if necessary, update its Code of Conduct and its values and ethics training program.
IM/IT Strategic Plan
The CRTC will update the IM/IT Strategic Plan annually.
IM/IT Strategic Plan
The CRTC will update the IM/IT Strategic Plan annually.
IM/IT Strategic Plan
The CRTC will update the IM/IT Strategic Plan annually.
Security and Business Continuity
The CRTC will test and update the Security and Business Continuity plans annually.
Security and Business Continuity
The CRTC will test and update the Security and Business Continuity plans annually.
Security and Business Continuity
The CRTC will test and update the Security and Business Continuity plans annually.
Employee development
The CRTC will align its employee development with the Canada School of Public Service’s curriculum on knowledge and competency development for employees and managers.
The CRTC will update its employee development program.

The CRTC will also launch a new training portal for Compliance and Enforcement employees to ensure that baseline training is available to them.
Employee development
The CRTC employee development program will be updated annually.

The CRTC will review and update its baseline training material for Compliance and Enforcement employees to ensure that it meets their needs.
Employee development
The CRTC employee development program will be updated annually.
Industry monitoring and reporting
The CRTC will continue to collect data from the industry and publish annual financial summaries as well as annual aggregate financial summaries for Canadian broadcasters.

Based on feedback gathered through internal and external consultations, the Communications Monitoring Report will include new data (namely, in the Telecommunications section) and better reflect differences between the French- and English-language markets. 
   
The CRTC’s digital presence
The CRTC will continue to enhance and leverage its digital presence and measure its efforts. The CRTC will create strategies to engage with Canadians regarding major public processes, and will continue to update its website’s structure and organization so that content is presented in a clear manner and is accessible and usable by all Canadians.
The CRTC’s digital presence
The CRTC will continue to enhance its digital presence by placing a strong focus on the measurement of its digital efforts to ensure that it continues to engage with Canadians and meet their information needs. The CRTC will also establish a performance measurement program for client services.
The CRTC’s digital presence
The CRTC will continue to leverage and measure its digital efforts.
Web search engine
The CRTC will improve and expand the search engine on its website to enable Canadians to find information on CRTC activities more effectively and efficiently.

The CRTC will acquire software and/or expertise, implement a test environment, and subsequently move into production.
Web search engine
The CRTC will annually monitor and improve, as required, the search engine on its website.
Web search engine
The CRTC will annually monitor and improve, as required, the search engine on its website.
Consumer Lens
The CRTC will continue to review the effectiveness of the Consumer Lens to ensure that the CRTC’s activities serve the public interest and that the needs of Canadians are reflected in its decision making processes.
Consumer Lens
The CRTC will assess the performance and impact of the Consumer Lens on an ongoing basis and modify it as necessary.
 
Strategic planning
The CRTC will work to enhance strategic planning processes and products to support results-based management and accountability.

The CRTC will also work to improve its internal capacity to carry out medium-term planning. 
Strategic planning
The CRTC will maintain, on an ongoing basis, a continuous improvement cycle that builds on previous successes to advance planning and reporting products.
Strategic planning
The CRTC will maintain, on an ongoing basis, a continuous improvement cycle that builds on previous successes to advance planning and reporting products.
Outreach and collaboration 
The CRTC will continue to reach out to other government departments and agencies, non-government organizations, and academia on strategic research and related initiatives to strength communication and build partnerships.

The CRTC will collaborate with the Canadian Communication Association to stimulate academic research in the field of communications policy.
Outreach and collaboration 
The CRTC will continue to identify and collaborate with researchers and academic networks to enhance its evidence repository to better reflect the public interest in its activities.
Outreach and collaboration 
The CRTC will continue to identify and collaborate with researchers and academic networks to enhance its evidence repository to better reflect the public interest in its activities.
International activities
The CRTC will continue to work closely with Canadian counterparts and international law enforcement agencies; and to participate in working groups, as well as in research activities conducted by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the International Institute of Communications (IIC).

The CRTC will also conduct comparative policy research to support current proceedings and policy-making. As well, it will continue to develop strategic international and domestic partnerships.
International activities
The CRTC will continue, on an ongoing basis, to work closely with Canadian counterparts and international law enforcement agencies; to participate in working groups, as well as in research activities conducted by the ITU, the OECD, and the IIC; and to continue to develop strategic international and domestic partnerships. 

The CRTC will also continue to conduct comparative policy research to support current proceedings and policy-making.
 
Application management system - APP
The APP software supports the execution of core CRTC activities by providing a single tool to manage all applications and submissions received in proceedings, plan major CRTC activities, and schedule Commission meetings through an integrated calendar.

The CRTC will develop a comprehensive, long-term strategy to govern the evolution of APP. APP user enhancements will be undertaken, and an updated training program will be launched.
Application management system - APP
The CRTC will implement the APP strategy.
Application management system - APP
The CRTC will continue to implement the APP strategy.
Open Data
The CRTC will launch a project to implement the Open Data initiative, which will include the release of pilot data sets (e.g. television viewing and ownership statistics, as well as commercial television statistical and financial summaries) on the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal.  

The CRTC will also launch a pilot project to publish the data sets used to compile the Communications Monitoring Report on the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal.
Open Data
The CRTC will review the results of previously released data sets, and adjust its data release approach, as required. The CRTC will continue to implement the Open Data initiative by publishing additional data sets on the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal.
 

Footnotes:

Footnotes

Footnote 1

This activity has replaced the activity formerly described as “Community Television Policy”.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 1

The activity was described as “Enhancements to 9-1-1 Services” in the CRTC’s 2014-17 Three-Year Plan.

Return to footnote 2 referrer