Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
Symbol of the Government of Canada

Common menu bar links

Reinvesting in the System

Tangible Benefits Policy
Priority Canadian Programming for Conventional Television Services
Pay and Specialty Television Services
A Measure of Success
Related Documents

A strong and diverse Canadian broadcasting system is a primary objective of Canada's Broadcasting Act, which states:

  • each element of the system must contribute to the creation and presentation of Canadian programming.

Tangible Benefits Policy

Since the CRTC does not solicit competitive applications to transfer the ownership or change the effective control of broadcasting undertakings, it expects applicants to offer significant benefits to the communities they propose to serve and to the Canadian broadcasting system.

The CRTC's tangible benefits policy applies to all transfers of ownership or change in the effective control involving:

  • conventional television stations;
  • pay television services;
  • pay-per-view television services;
  • specialty television services.

Generally, applicants must commit clear and tangible benefits that represent a financial contribution of 10% of the value of the transaction, as accepted by the CRTC. The onus is on the applicant to demonstrate that proposed benefits are commensurate with the size and nature of the transaction.

Priority Canadian Programming for Conventional Television Services

Priority Canadian programming refers to all Canadian programming, excepting news, information and sports programs, that is aired during peak viewing hours when most Canadians are watching television - i.e. between 7PM and 11PM.

In a highly competitive market, the CRTC expects television broadcasters will devote whatever expenditures are necessary to produce priority Canadian programming that will attract Canadian audiences during peak viewing hours.

In some instances, such as applications for new licences and transfers of control or ownership, the CRTC also requires minimum expenditures for Canadian programming.

Pay and Specialty Television Services

Expenditure requirements for pay-tv and specialty services vary for each service and are set by conditions of licence. Check decisions for individual services for details (Search).

A Measure of Success

Hundreds of millions of dollars in transfer of control benefits have been directed to the Canadian broadcasting system since the introduction of the new television policy in 1999. Refer to the Broadcasting Policy Monitoring Report for more details.

Related Documents

Building on Success - A Policy Framework for Canadian Television 
Broadcasting Policy Monitoring Report
Definitions for new types of priority programs 
Definitions of Canadian dramatic programs that will qualify for time credits towards priority programming requirements
Regulatory amendments to implement the Ethnic Broadcasting Policy and new television content categories