2015 Highlights - Private and CBC/Radio-Canada Conventional Television Statistical and Financial Summaries

Private Conventional Television

Figure 1: Key indicators for Canadian Private Conventional Television



This figure presents several key indicators for the Canadian private conventional television industry in 2015 and is divided into six sections. The first section features a chart and the remaining five sections present textual information.
Section 1: The first section features a combined column and line chart for the 5 year period from 2011 to 2015. The column chart shows the total revenues in millions of dollars. Total revenues were 2,139 million dollars in 2011, 2,038 in 2012, 1,944 million dollars in 2013, 1,804 million dollars in 2014 and 1,757 million dollars in 2015. The line chart plots PBIT margin in percent. PBIT margin was 7.3% in 2011, 1.1% in 2012, -0.1% in 2013, -7.7% in 2014 and -8.0% in 2015. Section 2: There were 93 private conventional television services in operation in 2015. 
Section 3: Total revenue was 1.76 billion dollars in 2015.
Section 4: Total expenditures were 1.82 billion dollars in 2015.
Section 5: Profit margin was -8.0 percent in 2015.
Section 6: Total employment was 5,790 in 2015.
  • The 93 private conventional television stations in operation in 2015 generated total revenues of $1.76 billion, down 2.6%, or $46.6 million, from 2014:
    • A drop of $13.6 million, or 9.9%, in “Other revenues” contributed to the decline in total revenues between 2014 and 2015. Examples of “Other revenues” include retransmission and Broadcasting Distribution Undertakings royalties, co-production sponsorship and donations.
    • The termination of the Local Programming Improvement Fund (LPIF) resulted in $21.7 million less revenues in 2015 compared to 2014.
    • Advertising revenues were relatively unchanged compared to the previous year, but have experienced a sharp decline since 2011 (-$309.0 million or -17.0%).
  • Private conventional television stations’ total revenues have been falling steadily in the last five years; they decreased by 17.9% or $381.9 million between 2011 and 2015.
  • Similar to private conventional television stations’ revenues, total expenditures has trended downward in the last five years; expenditures decreased by 3.9% ($72.7 million) between 2011 and 2015. Total expenditures were $1.82 billion in 2015, whichrepresents a 1.6% (-$29.0 million) decrease since 2014:
    • Spending was down in tree of the four expenditure categories (Program; Technical; and Sales & Promotion).
    • Program expenditures reported the largest decline, down $34.0 million (-2.4%). At $1.36 billion, Program expenditure nonetheless accounted for 75.1% of total expenses by private conventional television stations.
    • Administration & General expenditure was up 6.0% ($10.8 million).
  • Private conventional television stations were unprofitable in 2015:
    • Profitability, as measured by the Profit Before Interest and Taxes (PBIT) margin fell to -8.0% in 2015, down from -7.7% in 2014.
    • 2015 marked the third consecutive year of financial losses for the private conventional television stations.
  • Employment by the private conventional television stations totaled 5,790 individuals in 2015.The number of persons employed in that sector decreased by 172 individuals from 2014, and by 473 individuals since 2011.

Figure 2: Program Expenditures for Canadian Private Conventional Television



This figure presents several key indicators for private conventional television expenditures in 2015 and shows two diagrams decomposing program expenditures into more detailed components.
Diagram 1: The first diagram is a hierarchical chart of program expenditures. The top box presents total program expenditures and the three sub-boxes presents Canadian Programming Expenditures (CPE), non-Canadian program expenditures and production expenditures. The information presented in each box is as followed: Total program expenditures were 1.36 billion dollars, Canadian Programming Expenditures (CPE) were 653 million dollars, Non-Canadian Programming Expenditures were 656 million dollars, Production Expenditures were 54 million dollars. Diagram 2: The second diagram is composed of two pie charts and decomposes Canadian Programming Expenditures (CPE) by category. 
Pie Chart 1: This chart decomposes CPE into the following principal categories: Expenditure in Information programming was 407 million dollars, Expenditure in Music and Entertainment was 224 million dollars, Expenditure in Sports programming was 21 million dollars, Expenditure in others programming was 0.4 million dollars.
Pie Chart 2: This chart presents further detail regarding the Music and Entertainment CPE category, which totals 224 million dollars. It decomposes Music and Entertainment expenditures into the following principal categories: Expenditure in Human Interest programming was 87 million dollars, Expenditure in Drama programming was 50 million dollars, Expenditure in Other Music and Entertainment programming was 88 million dollars.
  • Program expenditures by private conventional television stations, which totalled $1.36 billion in 2015, were composed of:
    • Canadian Programming Expenditure (CPE): $652.8 million
    • Non-Canadian Programming Expenditure: $656.1 million
    • Production Expenditure: $54.4 million
  • Canadian Programming Expenditures”, or CPE, refers to the CRTC requirement imposed on most television broadcasters that they spend a minimum percentage of their revenues on content that makes use of Canadian resources.
  • In 2015, private conventional television stations invested $652.8 million in Canadian Programming Expenditures:
    • This represented a 5.4% (or $33.5 million) increase from 2014.
    • Spending on Information programming (News and Long form documentaries) totalled $406.9 million and accounted for 62.3% of total CPE.
    • The bulk ofInformation programming was in the News category at $369.6 million, or 56.6% of total CPE.
  • CPE by private conventional television stations has maintained consistent growth over the last 5 years:
    • These stations spent 16.0% more on CPE in 2015 than in 2011; Canadian programming expenses increased from $562.9 million to $652.8 million over the period.
    • CPE as a proportion of total program expenditure was 49.9% in 2015, higher than that reported in 2014 (46.3%) and markedly higher than that reported in 2011 (43.6%).
  • This year’s publication includes, for the first time, broadcasters’ programming spending for the Animation category, and children’s programming.  In 2015, private conventional stations’ total CPE included just over $358,000 in spending on Animation, and about $343,000 on Children’s programming.
  • Spending on non-Canadian programming by private conventional television stationsdecreased by $60.9 million (-8.5%) to $656.1 million in 2015.
    • Notably, expenditures on non-Canadian Drama programming decreased by $56.8 million relative to 2014.
    • Non-Canadian Drama nonetheless remained a major expense item for private conventional television stations; with spending of $432.9 million in 2015, this category accounted for 1/3 of total (CPE and non-Canadian combined) programming expenses.

CBC/Radio-Canada Conventional Television

Figure 3: Key Indicators for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation/Société Radio-Canada Conventional Television



This figure presents several key indicators for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (including the French sector) in 2015 and is divided into six sections. The first section features a chart and the remaining five sections present textual information.
Section 1: The first section features a column chart showing the decomposition of total revenues in million of dollars for the CBC over a five year period, from 2011 to 2015. These revenues are decomposed into parliamentary appropriation, advertising, and other. Parliamentary appropriation was 839 million dollars in 2011, 861 million dollars in 2012, 783 million dollars in 2013, 726 million dollars in 2014 and 758 million dollars in 2015. Advertising revenue was 370 million dollars in 2011, 373 million dollars in 2012, 331 million dollars in 2013, 475 million dollars in 2014 and 220 million dollars in 2015. Other revenues were 130 million dollars in 2011, 135 million dollars in 2012, 133 million dollars in 2013, 127 million dollars in 2014, 129 million dollars in 2015. Section 2: There were 27 CBC conventional television services in operation in 2015. Section 3: Total revenue was 1.11 billion dollars in 2015. Section 4: Parliamentary appropriation was 758 million dollars in 2015.Section 5: Total expenditures were 1.02 billion dollars in 2015. Section 6: Total employment was 5,205 in 2015.
  • The 27 CBC/Radio-Canada conventional television stations reported total revenues of $1.11 billion in 2015, down $220.9 million (or 16.6%) from 2014:
    • Following two years of decline, Parliamentary Appropriation rose 4.4% to $757.9 million in 2015, accounting for 68.5% of total revenues.
    • The termination of the LPIF resulted in $17.6 million less revenues in 2015 compared to the previous year.
    • Advertising revenues decreased by 53.6% to $220.1 million in the past year. This is in part linked to the loss of the National Hockey League TV rights, combined with the absence of major sports events – namely the Olympics and FIFA World Cup – that generated additional advertising revenues in 2014.
  • In 2015, total expenses on the CBC/Radio-Canada conventional television stations fell 18.1% (or $226.2 million) relative to 2014 to $1.02 billion. This included a 23.5% decrease in Program expenses, which were of $687.3 million in 2015, down from $897.9 million in 2014.
  • CBC/Radio-Canada conventional television station employed 5,205 individuals in 2015. The number of individuals employed is down 638 (or 10.9%) from 2014, and 1,009 since 2011.

Figure 4: Key indicators for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television - Expenditures



This figure presents several key indicators for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (including the French sector) in 2015 and shows two diagrams decomposes program expenditures into more detailed components. 
Diagram 1: The first diagram is a hierarchical chart of program expenditures. The top box presents total program expenditures and the three sub-boxes presents Canadian Programming Expenditures (CPE), non-Canadian programming expenditures and production expenditures. The information presented in each box is as followed: Total programming & production expenditures were 687 million dollars, Canadian Programming Expenditures (CPE) were 557 million dollars, Non-Canadian Programming Expenditures were 21 million dollars, Production Expenditures were 109 million dollars. Diagram 2: The second diagram is composed of two pie charts and decomposes Canadian Programming Expenditures (CPE) by category. 
Pie Chart 1: This chart decomposes CPE into the following categories: Expenditure in Music and Entertainment was 250 million dollars, Expenditure in Information programming was 207 millions of dollars, Expenditure in Sports programming was 36 million dollars, Expenditure in others programming was 1 million dollars.
Pie Chart 2: This chart presents further detail regarding the Music and Entertainment CPE category, which totals 250 million dollars. It decomposes Music and Entertainment expenditures into the following categories: Expenditure in Drama programming was 144 million dollars, Expenditure in Human Interest programming was 45 million dollars, Expenditure in other Music and Entertainment programming was 61 million dollars.
  • Program expenditures by the CBC/Radio-Canada conventional television stations, which totalled $687.3 million in 2015, were composed of:
    • Canadian Programming Expenditure (CPE): $557.2 million
    • Non-Canadian Programming Expenditure: $21.1 million
    • Production Expenditure: $109.0 million
  • Program expenditures decreased by $210.6 million (-23.5%) relative to 2014.
    • The most notable decline was in the Sports programming category, -$222.1 million to $35.9 million in 2015, in absence of major sports events that were aired on the CBC/Radio-Canada conventional television stations in 2014.
  • As Canada’s public broadcaster, the CBC/Radio-Canada invests heavily in Canadian programming:
    • In 2015, CBC/Radio-Canada spent $557.2 million on Canadian television content, which represented 96.4% of total (Canadian and non-Canadian combined) programming expenses.
  • In 2015, Canadian programming expenditures on the CBC/Radio-Canada conventional television stations were mostly composed of Information ($270.1 million) – including news programming ($190.9 million) - and Music & Entertainment ($250.1 million).
  • Expenditure on Canadian Drama programming ($144.1 million) by the CBC/Radio-Canada was almost three times that spent by the private conventional television services in 2015.
  • Of a total of $557.2 million it spent on Canadian Programming Expenditure, the CBC/Radio-Canada reported $9.0 million in the Animation category, and a total of $33.8 million on children’s programming in 2015.
Date modified: