Communications Monitoring Report 2013

September 2013


Revisions to the Communications Monitoring Report – January 2014

  • Table 2.2.7
    Incumbent monthly service rate and percentage change for the level 1 basket in Vancouver are revised from $33.38 to 30.38, and from -3.3% to -12.0% respectively.  
  • Table 4.3.16
    Amounts for Canadian programming expenditure and annual growth rate for sports in 2011 are revised from 8,482 to 848, and from -94.0% to -99.4% respectively; and the 2012 annual growth rate revised from 707.4% to 7,974.0%.
  • Figure 5.3.5
    Due to rounding, the percentages in the figure displaying the residential Internet access subscriber technology mix 2012 exceeded 100%.  The figures are revised as follows: Cable: from 56% to 54%, DSL: from 41% to 40% and Other: from 5% to 4%.
  • Section 5.5 Wireless market sector at a glance table
    The average capex per user is revised to indicate that the figure is a monthly figure. 
  • Figure 7.1.8 Mobile Broadband Average Measured Speeds
    Explanatory text is inserted below the graph:

    A minimum of 1,000 unique IP addresses connecting to Akamai from the network in the third quarter of 2012 was required for inclusion in the list. In countries where Akamai had data for multiple network providers, only the top three are listed, based on unique IP address count. The names of specific mobile network providers have been made anonymous, and providers are identified by a unique ID. Data is included only for networks where Akamai believes that the entire Autonomous System (AS) is mobile — that is, if a network provider mixes traffic from fixed/wireline (DSL, cable, etc.) connections with traffic from mobile connections on a single network identifier, that AS was not included in the source data set. Akamai’s EdgeScape database was used for the geo­graphic assignments.

    Source:  Akamai

 

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Acknowledgements

The Commission wishes to thank all the entities that completed the CRTC Data Collection forms, without which this report would not have been possible. The Commission would also like to acknowledge the assistance provided by Industry Canada in the analysis of broadband deployment as it related to the rural communities in Canada; Statistics Canada for the various supplementary data used in this report; BBM Canada for audience measures; BBM Analytics for Media Technology Monitor (MTM) syndicated reports; and Mediastats.

Interested parties are welcome to provide comments for improvements or additions to future editions of the report. You can send your comments to the attention of the Secretary General, CRTC, Ottawa, K1A 0N2.

Chairman’s message

I am pleased to present the 2013 Communications Monitoring Report. This edition provides the most comprehensive view to date of the Canadian communication sector and how it compares with other countries.

The average Canadian household spends more than $185 each month on communications services, including wireline, wireless, television and Internet services. By supervising and monitoring the broadcasting and telecommunications sectors, the CRTC seeks to ensure that these services meet the needs of Canadians as citizens, creators and consumers.

As illustrated throughout the Communications Monitoring Report, Canadians are generally well-served by their communications system. They have access to a wide array of programming and services that enable them to participate in Canada’s democratic life, create high-quality Canadian content that can be shared with audiences on multiple platforms, and choose from different service providers, both large and small.

This report also suggests that certain segments of the communications market require regulatory attention to achieve Parliament of Canada’s social, cultural and economic objectives. We will therefore be targeting many of these areas, such as the telecommunications services available in Canada’s North, through the activities listed in the CRTC Three-Year Plan 2013-2016.

The Communications Monitoring Report continues to evolve as we work to ensure that Canadians remain at the centre of a world-class communications system. This edition has been reorganized to present information on the CRTC’s three pillars: create, connect, and protect. In addition, certain sections have been expanded to provide additional details. All participants in the Canadian communication system are invited to use this information to contribute to our public proceedings.

 

Jean-Pierre Blais

Chairman and CEO

Executive summary

The Communications Monitoring Report provides a window to the broadcasting and telecommunications sectors and is intended to foster an open and informed public discussion of broadcasting and telecommunications regulatory policies and issues. The CRTC invites Canadians to use this report to enrich their participation in the regulatory process.

Canadians at the heart of their communications system

Communications plays an important part in the daily lives of Canadians. The communications system provides a means for Canadians – as consumers, citizens, or creators – to participate in the economic, cultural and social aspects of their country. In 2012, the amount that Canadian households allocated to communications services increased by 2.5% from $181 to $185 per month.

That year, telecommunications services accounted for 72% of communications expenditures. In particular, Canadians spent 3.6% more on telecommunications services, which include wireline (local and long-distance), Internet, and wireless services. On the other hand, expenditures on television distribution services decreased by 0.8%.

Approximately 44% of all connections were made by wireless services, followed by television distribution and local telephone services at 19% each, and Internet services at 18%.

Guided by its legislative mandate, the CRTC seeks to ensure that Canadians have access to a world-class communications system. This overarching objective is supported by the Commission’s three pillars: create, connect, and protect. This report is structured around activities relating to these pillars.

Create

In 2011-2012, the Canadian broadcasting sector invested $3.4 billion on Canadian content.

Commercial radio broadcasters contributed over $55 million to the development of Canadian content, an increase of 2% from the previous broadcast year. This represents 3.4 cents out of every dollar that these broadcasters earned in revenue.

Television broadcasters spent $2.9 billion on Canadian programming, representing 68% of all programming expenditures and an increase of 9.6% from the previous year. As a broadcaster’s largest expense, the production and acquisition of programming accounted for 64 cents out of every dollar earned in revenue.

In 2011-2012, cable and satellite companies directed 6% of the revenues collected from subscribers toward the creation and production of Canadian programming. Of this percentage, 41% was directed to the CMF; 24%, to cable community channels and other sources of local expression; 22%, to the LPIF and 13% to independent funds.

Canadians in English-language markets have been spending less time watching Canadian television services, which has resulted in a decline in viewing shares from 87.9% in 2009-2010 to 86.7% in 2010-2011, to 86.0% in 2011-2012. The opposite trend has been occurring in French-language markets, where viewing of Canadian television services increased from 98.4% in 2009-2010 to 98.5% in 2010-2011, to 98.6% in 2011-2012.

Average weekly viewing hours of Canadian programs for English-language services, excluding the Quebec francophone market, increased from 43% in 2009-2010 to 43.8% in 2011-2012, while viewing of French-language services in the Quebec francophone market declined from 64.5% to 63.2% over those years.

Connect

Canadians have been using a number of means to access content and to connect with each other in Canada and around the world. In 2012, 86% of Canadian households subscribed to a cable or satellite television service and 78% subscribed to high-speed Internet service. In that year, 81% of Canadians subscribed to a wireless service, of which 52% used smartphones, tablets and/or other advanced handheld devices to communicate. In 2012, over 55% of Canadians read online news and over 20% watched Internet TV on their landline or mobile devices. On average, there were 4.5 connections per household in 2012, a statistic relatively unchanged from the previous year. In 2012, Canadians continued to adapt to wireless services, albeit at a slower pace than in previous years, as the number of subscribers increased by 1.8%, compared to increases above 6% in previous years.

Household subscription data

Household subscription data is based on the Survey of Household Spending performed annually by Statistics Canada. 2011 data was the most recent data available at the time that this report was prepared.

In 2011, the amount of Canadian households subscribing to wireline and/or wireless telephone services remained unchanged at 99.3%. However, households have been gradually increasing their reliance on wireless services, as evidenced by the fact that households subscribing to local wireline services declined by 2.9% from 89.1% in 2010 to 86.5% in 2011, while those subscribing to wireless service increased over those years by 1.5% from 78.2% to 79.4%. This increased reliance on wireless services was more pronounced for households with annual incomes below $28,000. The percentage of these households subscribing to wireline services decreased by 7.5% from 82.2% in 2010 to 76% in 2011, while the percentage subscribing to wireless service increased over those years by 4.4% from 54.9% to 57.3%.

The average monthly price of basic residential local telephone service in the major centres that the Commission has forborne from price regulation increased from $22.90 in 2005 to $28.25 in 2012, resulting in an average annual price increase of 2.9%. Over this period, inflation, as measured by the change in the CPI, averaged 1.9%. Companies using VoIP technology generally offered local telephone services at 2005 prices or lower. In 2012, approximately 700,000 households subscribed to this type of service.

In 2012, there were approximately 10 million subscriptions with bundled services that provided discounts to the service package. On average, these bundles reduced the price of basic residential local telephone service. A number of incumbent telephone companies only bundled basic local service if the service was “upgraded” to include additional features such as call display or call forwarding. This essentially matched the service offerings of their competitors as most of them did not offer basic local telephone service on its own. They generally included additional calling features.

A decreasing number of payphones are available to Canadians. Payphone service revenues and connections declined by 17% and 4%, respectively. The number of payphones per 1,000 households declined by 5.6% from 5.4 in 2011 to 5.1 in 2012.

Almost all Canadians have access to basic (i.e., 1.5 Mbps) broadband Internet service. In 2011, the Commission set a download speed target of at least 5 Mbps. It expects all ISPs to offer this speed by 2015. Since that time, availability of 5 Mbps broadband service has increased from 87% to 94%. In general, Canadians living in large population centres have access to broadband speeds in the 50 Mbps to 99 Mbps range, whereas only 12% of Canadians in rural areas can access these speeds.

Protect

The CRTC uses consumer contacts and complaints to assess the effectiveness of its regulatory frameworks and to determine whether the industry is serving the needs of Canadians. In the 12-month period ending 31 March 2013, the Commission received 31,300 enquiries and complaints. Of these, 55% concerned broadcasting issues and 45% pertained to telecommunications issues. Broadcasting complaints generally focused on offensive comments.

On the other hand, telecommunications complaints, including the 12,000 complaints received by the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services, related to wireless (39%), telemarketing (20%), Internet services (13%). The underlying issues in these complaints consisted of billing errors (42%), contract disputes/terms of service (16%), and service delivery/provision of service (12%).

Communications revenues on the rise

In 2012, revenues for the communication sector reached $60.7 billion, 2.3% higher than in 2011. The sector was dominated by five large companies that collectively generated 82% of the communications revenues. The next five companies generated 10% of these revenues, with the remaining companies accounting for 8%. Only three companies offered every service in every sector of the communications market. These three companies generated 61% of the communications revenues.

Broadcasting

In 2011-2012, broadcasting revenues totaled $16.8 billion, a 1.4% increase from the previous year. In that sector, the radio market sector was the smallest, accounting for 10% of broadcasting revenues. Radio revenues increased by 0.4% from $1.61 billion to $1.62 billion. The television market was the second largest, accounting for 39% of the revenues. Television revenues increased by 1.9% from $6.39 billion to $6.51 billion. In that market, private conventional television broadcasters experienced a 5% decline in revenues. However, this decline was offset by a 5.9% increase in pay, pay-per-view, video-on-demand, and specialty service revenues. The cable and satellite market was the largest sector, capturing 52% of the broadcasting revenues. That market’s revenues increased by 1.1% from $8.60 billion to $8.70 billion. Three companies operating in each of these broadcasting markets captured 66% of the broadcasting revenues.

Canadians had access to 1,141 OTA radio stations in 2011-2012. Approximately 50% of these consisted of private commercial FM stations, while around 12% were AM stations. The national public broadcaster, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, operated 8% of the OTA stations. The remaining 30% generally consisted of community (10%), campus (4%), and aboriginal (5%) stations. The Commission also authorized 28 new FM stations for broadcast.

In 2011-2012, Canadians had access to 228 discretionary television services. Their revenues amounted to approximately $4 billion and represented 61% of the television sector revenues. The top 10 discretionary services, based on revenues, consisted of three sports services, two movie services, two youth-oriented services, two educational services, and one news service. These services averaged $148 million in revenues and captured 37% of the discretionary service revenues. The remaining discretionary services averaged $12 million in revenues.

Telecommunications

In 2012, telecommunications revenues rose to $43.9 billion, an increase of 2.7% from the previous year. The five largest companies captured 85% of these revenues, followed by the next five at 9%. Companies operating in all of the markets accounted for 87% of the revenues.

The wireless market was the largest and fastest growing sector, capturing 46% of the telecommunications revenues and sustaining an annual growth revenue of 6.5%. Although revenues increased from $19.1 billion in 2011 to $20.4 billion in 2012, the number of subscribers increased by only 1.8% from 27.4 million to 27.9 million. Wireless data and roaming services were the key drivers in wireless revenue growth, increasing by 22% from $6.4 billion to $7.8 billion.

Almost all retail telecommunications revenues (93%) were earned by forborne services, compared to 76% for wholesale services.

Wholesale services generated $3.7 billion in revenues, 0.5% more than in 2011. Local telephone and access services represented 33% of wholesale service revenues, followed by private line and Ethernet service revenues at 27%, respectively.

 


Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction

1.1 Methodology / Data collection

1.2 The CRTC

2.0 Canadians at the centre of the communications system

2.1 Create

a) Radio - Canadian content development (CCD)

b) Radio - Tangible benefits

c) Television - Programming expenditures

d) Television - Tangible benefits

e) BDU - Contribution and expenditure regimes

2.2 Connect

a) Connections

b) Telephone penetration rates

c) Residential communications service prices

d) Basic local residential landline telephone service prices

e) Wireless telephone service prices

f) Consumers' expenditures on communications services

g) Telecommunications contribution and subsidy regime

2.3 Protect

a) Programming of high standard

b) Loud television commercials

c) Telecommunications complaints

d) DNCL - Telemarketing

3.0 The Communications service industry

3.1 Overview

a) Industry revenues

b) Industry characteristics

c) Financial performance

4.0 Broadcasting system

4.1 Financial review

a) Industry revenues

b) Industry characteristics

c) Financial performance

4.2 Radio market sector

a) Radio services available and/or authorized to broadcast

b) Audience measurement

c) Financial performance

4.3 Television market sector

a) Television services available and/or authorized to broadcast

b) Audience measurement

c) Financial performance

d) Ownership groups

e) Programming expenditures

4.4 Broadcasting distribution market sector

a) Industry revenues

b) Subscriber data

c) Performance and technology indicators

d) Financial performance

e) Disbursements under affiliate agreements

5.0 Telecommunications service industry

5.1 Financial review

a) Industry revenues

b) Technology indicators

c) Industry characteristics

d) Financial performance

e) Forbearance and wholesale revenue data

5.2 Wireline voice market sector

a) Industry revenues

b) Subscriber line and minute data

c) Performance and technology indicators

5.3 Internet market sector

a) Industry revenues

b) Subscriber data

c) Plans and pricing

d) Performance and technology indicators

5.4 Data and private line market sector

a) Industry revenues

b) Performance and technology indicators

5.5 Wireless market sector

a) Revenue and subscriber data

b) Capital expenditures and wholesale revenue data

c) Performance and technology indicators

d) Coverage / availability details

6.0 Broadband availability and adoption of digital technologies

6.1 Broadband availability and capacity requirements

a) Key broadband indicators

b) Broadband availability by speed

c) Availability by province

d) Urban v. rural

6.2 Adoption of digital technologies

a) Financial performance

b) Digital media services

c) Video

d) Audio

e) Mobile

7.0 International perspective

7.1 How Canada compares internationally

a) Service pricing - Individual services and bundled rates

b) Revenues - Telecommunications market sector

c) Broadband market sector

d) Wireless market sector - performance indicators

e) Radio market sector - Performance indicators

f) Television market sector - Performance indicators

 

Appendix 1 Data collection and analysis

Appendix 2 Classification of Canadian TSPs

Appendix 3 Status of local forbearance - residential and business exchanges

Appendix 4 International pricing assumptions

Appendix 5 Telecommunications market sector description

Appendix 6 List of acronyms used in the report

Appendix 7 List of decisions, public notices, orders, circulars, and regulatory policies referenced in the report

Appendix 8 List of companies referenced in the report

List of charts

Chart 2.1.1 CCD contributions by commercial radio stations (2011-2012 broadcast year)

Chart 2.1.2 Funding and spending by broadcasting entities to Canadian programming (2011 - 2012 broadcast year)

List of tables

Table 2.1.1 Summary of annual CCD contributions reported by radio licensees

Table 2.1.2 Value of radio transactions and corresponding tangible benefits

Table 2.1.3 Programs of national interest expenditures

Table 2.1.4 Value of television transactions and corresponding tangible benefits

Table 2.1.5 LPIF - Contributions and number of recipients

 

Table 2.2.1 Number of household connections

Table 2.2.2 Provincial telephone penetration rates - Wireline and wireless subscribers per 100 households, 2011

Table 2.2.3 Canadian telephone penetration rates - Wireline and wireless subscribers per 100 households

Table 2.2.4 Canadian telephone penetration rates by income quintile - Wireline and wireless subscribers per 100 households

Table 2.2.5 Local residential telephone service prices in major centres ($/month)

Table 2.2.6 Number of subscriptions with bundled services

Table 2.2.7 Canadian wireless monthly service rates ($) - incumbents v. new entrants

Table 2.2.8 Household communications expenditures as a percentage of annual income, by quintile, 2011

Table 2.2.9 Monthly household communications expenditures, by service and by quintile ($/month)

 

Table 2.3.1 Number of contacts by public

Table 2.3.2 Broadcasting complaints by sector, by issue

Table 2.3.3 Complaints handled by the CBSC

Table 2.3.4 Complaints handled by the ASC

Table 2.3.5 complaints received by the CRTC, 2012-2013

Table 2.3.6 Summary of issues raised in telecommunications complaints handled by the CCTS, 2011-2012

Table 2.3.7 National DNCL key statistics

 

Table 3.1.1 Communications revenues

Table 3.1.2 Industry revenues by type of provider

Table 3.1.3 Industry convergence: Cable v. Telecommunications

Table 3.1.4 Percent of broadcasting and telecommunications revenues generated by companies operating in multiple sectors

 

Table 4.1.1 Broadcasting revenues

Table 4.1.2 Percentage of broadcasting revenues generated by companies operating in multiple sectors

 

Table 4.2.1 Number and type of radio and audio services authorized to broadcast in Canada

Table 4.2.2 Number of new over-the-air radio stations approved

Table 4.2.3 Average weekly hours tuned per capita by age group for all Canada

Table 4.2.4 Radio tuning share in an average week and average weekly hours tuned by listener for English- and French-language AM and FM bands

Table 4.2.5 Fall tuning achieved by largest English- and French-language private commercial radio operators in Canada

Table 4.2.6 Revenues and number of undertakings reporting financial results for private commercial radio stations - English- and French-language, and Ethnic

Table 4.2.7 Revenues -CBC radio

Table 4.2.8 English-language and French-language radio revenues and number of undertakings reporting for the largest radio operators in Canada

Table 4.2.9 Revenues for Type B Native, community, and campus radio stations

 

Table 4.3.1 Number and type of television services authorized to broadcast in Canada

Table 4.3.2 National average weekly viewing hours, by age group

Table 4.3.3 Viewing share of Canadian and non-Canadian services, by language and type of service - All of Canada, excluding the Quebec Francophone market

Table 4.3.4 Viewing share of Canadian and non-Canadian services, by language and type of service in the Quebec Francophone market

Table 4.3.5 Average weekly viewing hours of Canadian programs distributed by Canadian English- and French-language television services, by program origin, genre and region

Table 4.3.6 Average weekly viewing hours of Canadian programs distributed by Canadian English- and French-language private conventional services, by program origin, genre and region

Table 4.3.7 Average weekly viewing hours of Canadian programs distributed by Canadian English- and French-language CBC conventional services, by program origin, genre and region

Table 4.3.8 Average weekly viewing hours of Canadian programs distributed by Canadian English- and French-language pay and specialty services, by program origin, genre and region

Table 4.3.9 Viewing share of Canadian services by ownership group in the English- and French-language markets

Table 4.3.10 Television revenues by type of service

Table 4.3.11 Advertising and other revenues: CBC conventional television stations (owned and operated)

Table 4.3.12 Advertising and other revenues by English- and French-language market for private conventional television stations

Table 4.3.13 Revenues by English- and French-language, and Ethnic markets and by Specialty, Pay, PPV and VOD services

Table 4.3.14 Ownership groups with significant ownership interest in specialty, pay, PPV, and VOD services

Table 4.3.15 Canadian Programming Expenditure (CPE) - CBC English- and French-language conventional television

Table 4.3.16 Canadian Programming Expenditure (CPE) - Private conventional television

Table 4.3.17 Expenditures on non-Canadian programming - Private conventional television

Table 4.3.18 Expenditures on Canadian and non-Canadian programming by genre reported by specialty and pay services

Table 4.3.19 Canadian programming expenditures (CPE) reported by PPV and VOD services

 

Table 4.4.1 Broadcasting distribution - Basic and non-basic revenues

Table 4.4.2 Broadcasting distribution - Basic and non-basic subscribers

Table 4.4.3 Top Canadian distributors and number of subscribers

Table 4.4.4 Broadcasting distribution - Percentage of households subscribing to BDUs

Table 4.4.5 Affiliation payments made to Canadian and non-Canadian pay, PPV, VOD, and specialty services reported by BDUs

 

Table 5.1.1 Retail and wholesale telecommunications revenues

Table 5.1.2 Telecommunications revenues, by market sector

Table 5.1.3 Wireline telecommunications revenue market share (%), by type of TSP, 2012

Table 5.1.4 Percentage of telecommunications revenues generated by companies operating in multiple markets

Table 5.1.5 Total telecommunications revenues, by type of service provider

Table 5.1.6 Telecommunications capex, by type of TSP

Table 5.1.7 Percentage of telecommunications revenues generated by forborne services

 

Table 5.2.1 Local and access, and long distance revenues

Table 5.2.2 Local and access revenues, by type of TSP

Table 5.2.3 Local wholesale revenues, by major component

Table 5.2.4 Long distance revenues, by type of TSP

Table 5.2.5 Number of local telephone lines, access dependent v. access independent

Table 5.2.6 Local and access lines, by type of TSP

Table 5.2.7 Local and long distance retail monthly revenues per line ($)

Table 5.2.8 Local and access retail monthly revenues ($), per line by type of TSP

Table 5.2.9 Local and access, and long distance forborne revenues and lines (%)

Table 5.2.10 Incumbent TSP provincial retail local market share, by line (%)

Table 5.2.11 Incumbent TSP residential and business local market share (%), by line for major centres

Table 5.2.12 Large incumbent TSPs' retail long distance revenue market share (%), by region

Table 5.2.13 Long distance retail revenues ($) per minute, by type of TSP

 

Table 5.3.1 Internet revenues, by type of service

Table 5.3.2 Residential Internet subscribers, by type of TSP

Table 5.3.3 Number of business Internet access subscriptions, by type of TSP

Table 5.3.4 Residential Internet speeds and pricing

 

Table 5.4.1 Data and private line revenues

Table 5.4.2 Data protocol revenues, by service category

Table 5.4.3 Private line revenues, by service category

Table 5.4.4 Data protocol revenue market share, by service category (%)

Table 5.4.5 Private line - revenue market share (%)

 

Table 5.5.1 Wireless and paging revenues and number of subscribers

Table 5.5.2 Wireless and paging revenue components

Table 5.5.3 Prepaid and post paid wireless revenues (basic voice and long distance)

Table 5.5.4 Number of post paid subscribers as a percentage of total wireless subscribers

Table 5.5.5 Wireless subscriber market share, by province, 2012 (%)

Table 5.5.6 Advanced handheld devices, by province,2012

Table 5.5.7 Wireless ARPU, by province (excluding paging)

Table 5.5.8 Wireless average monthly churn rates (percentage)

Table 5.5.9 Mobile broadband subscribers

Table 5.5.10 Wireless coverage, penetration, and ARPU, by province, 2012

Table 5.5.11 Percentage of population with access to one, two, three, or four or more facilities-based WSPs, by province, 2012

 

Table 6.1.1 Internet access speed requirements for a number of commonly accessed online services

Table 6.1.2 Number of usage hours before reaching various capacity thresholds by service

Table 6.1.3 Key telecommunications availability indicators

Table 6.1.4 Broadband availability platforms, by speed and number of platforms, 2012 (percentage of households)

Table 6.1.5 Broadband availability, by speed and province/territory, 2012 (percentage of households)

Table 6.1.6 Number of households that can have broadband access (thousands)

 

Table 6.2.1 Media technology adoption by consumers categorized by life cycle stage in Canada, 2012

Table 6.2.2 Percentage of Canadians using the Internet, by linguistic group

Table 6.2.3 Average weekly hours spent online by Canadians Internet users

Table 6.2.4 Adoption and growth rate of various video technologies in Canada (Percentage)

Table 6.2.5 Adoption and growth rates of various audio technologies in Canada (Percentage)

Table 6.2.6 Mobile device penetration by linguistic group (Percentage)

 

Table 7.1.1 International pricing (average price ($) per month)

Table 7.1.2 Average advertised Internet speeds (Mbps) across OECD countries, by access technology

Table 7.1.3 Smart connected devices - global shipments by category

Table 7.1.4 Wireless industry performance indicators for a select number of countries, 2012

Table 7.1.5 Radio performance indicators for a select number of countries, 2012

Table 7.1.6 Television performance indicators for a select number of countries, 2012

List of figures

Figure 2.1.1 CCD contributions by type of radio licence

Figure 2.1.2 CCD contributions by type of radio licence

Figure 2.1.3 Television CPE, by type of service, 2012

Figure 2.1.4 Television programming expenditures, PNI v. Canadian v. non Canadian, 2012

Figure 2.1.5 Programming expenditures per revenue dollar

Figure 2.1.6 Contributions to the CMF, LPIF, other independent funds, and expenditures on local expression (community channels) reported by BDUs

Figure 2.1.7 Contributions to the creation and production of Canadian programming by BDUs

Figure 2.1.8 LPIF distribution by region

Figure 2.1.9 LPIF distribution by ownership group

 

Figure 2.2.1 Residential connections, by type of connection 24

Figure 2.2.2 Price indices [TPI, BDU (cable and satellite, including pay television), Internet access services, and CPI]

Figure 2.2.3 Subsidy paid to LECs and the revenue-percent charge

 

Figure 2.3.1 Number of broadcasting complaints received and referred to the CBSC 33

Figure 2.3.2 Percentage of broadcasting complaints by sector, 2012-2013

Figure 2.3.3 Number of loudness inquiries received by the CRTC

Figure 2.3.4 Number of registrations on the National DNCL

 

Figure 3.1.1 Broadcasting and telecommunications annual revenue growth rates 42

Figure 3.1.2 Broadcasting and telecommunications revenues for the top 5 company groups, the next 5 company groups, and the remaining company groups

Figure 3.1.3 Broadcasting and telecommunications revenues by type of provider, 2012

Figure 3.1.4 Commercial broadcasting and telecommunications revenues (excluding non-programming and exempt services)

Figure 3.1.5 BDU revenues by service type

Figure 3.1.6 Canadian broadcasting and telecommunications revenue composition for a select number of large companies

Figure 3.1.7 BDU - EBITDA margins achieved from all services (programming, exempted, and non-programming)

 

Figure 4.1.1 Broadcasting revenues for the top 5 company groups, the next 5 company groups, and the remaining company groups 51

Figure 4.1.2 Commercial radio revenues, by broadcaster, 2012

Figure 4.1.3 Commercial television revenues, by broadcaster, 2012

Figure 4.1.4 BDU revenues by operator, 2012

Figure 4.1.5 Total broadcasting revenues and PBIT/EBITDA margins

 

Figure 4.2.1 Type of radio and audio services authorized to broadcast in Canada, 2012 58

Figure 4.2.2 Radio tuningby station type in diary markets

Figure 4.2.3 Radio tuning shares - English-language station formats in diary markets

Figure 4.2.4 Radio tuning shares - French-language station formats in diary markets

Figure 4.2.5 Radio tuning shares - English-language station formats in PPM markets

Figure 4.2.6 Radio tuning shares - French-language station formats in PPM markets

Figure 4.2.7 Revenues -Private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.8 Average annual revenues and PBIT per station - Private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.9 PBIT and PBIT margin -Private commercial radio stations 66

Figure 4.2.10 Revenues - English-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.11 Average annual revenues and PBIT per station - English-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.12 PBIT and PBIT margin - English-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.13 Revenues - French-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.14 Average annual revenues and PBIT per station - French-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.15 PBIT and PBIT margin - French-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.16 Revenues - Ethnic private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.17 Average annual revenues and PBIT per station - Ethnic private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.18 PBIT and PBIT margin - Ethnic private commercial radio stations

 

Figure 4.3.1 Television revenues: CBC and private conventional television, pay, PPV, VOD, and specialty services 87

Figure 4.3.2 Source of revenues for private conventional television, 2012

Figure 4.3.3 Advertising revenues -CBC conventional television stations (owned & operated)

Figure 4.3.4 Ranking by revenue for individual Specialty, Pay, PPV and VOD services in descending order, 2012

Figure 4.3.5 Aggregrate PBIT margins for private conventional television, pay, PPV & VOD services and Category A, B and C specialty services

Figure 4.3.6 Revenues of English-language private conventional television, specialty, pay, PPV, and VOD services

Figure 4.3.7 Aggregate PBIT margins for English-language private conventional television, specialty, pay, PPV and VOD services

Figure 4.3.8 Revenues of French-language private conventional television, specialty, pay, PPV, and VOD services

Figure 4.3.9 Aggregate PBIT of French-language private conventional television, pay, PPV, VOD, and specialty services

Figure 4.3.10 Revenues of ethnic and third-language specialty and pay services

Figure 4.3.11 PBIT margins of ethnic and third-language specialty and pay services

Figure 4.3.12 Revenues of top three English-language private conventional television ownership groups

Figure 4.3.13 Revenues of top two French-language private conventional television ownership groups

Figure 4.3.14 Canadian Programming expenditures (CPE) - distribution by genre for private conventional television, 2012

 

Figure 4.4.1 Percentage of revenues and subscribers by type of distribution platform in 2012 113

Figure 4.4.2 Percentage of BDU subscribers receiving digital and non-digital services

Figure 4.4.3 EBITDA margins achieved from basic and non-basic programming services

 

Figure 5.1.1 Telecommunications revenues and annual growth 120

Figure 5.1.2 Annual telecommunications revenue growth, by market sector

Figure 5.1.3 Residential IP-provisioned service revenues

Figure 5.1.4 Total telecommunications revenue market share, by type of TSP, 2012

Figure 5.1.5 Distribution of telecommunications revenues, by market sector

Figure 5.1.6 Telecommunications revenues for the top 5 company groups, the next 5 company groups, and the remaining company groups

Figure 5.1.7 Total telecommunications revenue market share, by type of TSP, 2012

Figure 5.1.8 Telecommunications revenues and EBITDA margins 127

Figure 5.1.9 Telecommunications capex as a percentage of revenues, by type of TSP

Figure 5.1.10 Telecommunications wholesale service revenues, tariff v. off-tariff v. non-tariff, 2012

Figure 5.1.11 Telecommunications wholesale service revenues, by type of service, 2012

 

Figure 5.2.1 Large incumbent TSPs' payphone revenues and quantities 132

Figure 5.2.2 Access-independent and access-dependent retail VoIP local lines, by market 2012

Figure 5.2.3 Alternative TSP local retail lines (excluding incumbent out-of-territory), by type of facility

Figure 5.2.4 Alternative TSP local residential and business lines, by type of facility, 2012

Figure 5.2.5 Number of payphones per 1000 households

Figure 5.2.6 Fibre-based lines (FTTN and FTTP) as a percentage of total lines, 2012

 

Figure 5.3.1 Broadband subscriptions - Incumbent TSP v. Cable BDU 147

Figure 5.3.2 High-speed residential subscribers by GB downloadable capacity

Figure 5.3.3 Internet access revenue shares, by type of ISP, 2012

Figure 5.3.4 Business Internet access revenues, by access technology, 2008 v. 2012

Figure 5.3.5 Residential Internet access technology mix, 2008 v. 2012

 

Figure 5.4.1 Data and private line revenue market share, by type of TSP 155

Figure 5.4.2 Data revenue market share, by type of TSP

 

Figure 5.5.1 Wireless revenue and subscriber growth rates (excluding paging) 158

Figure 5.5.2 Wireless Capex and ACEPU

Figure 5.5.3 Wireless retail and wholesale revenues, 2012

Figure 5.5.4 TSPs' wireless subscriber market share

Figure 5.5.5 TSPs' wireless revenue market share

Figure 5.5.6 Mobile data-only plan1revenues, subscribers, and monthly ARPU, by data plan capacity, 2012

Figure 5.5.7 Total number of MMS and SMS messages

Figure 5.5.8 Percent of mobile revenues, voice v. standard broadband v. dedicated broadband, 2012

Figure 5.5.9 Wireless coverage, penetration, and ARPU by province, 2012

Figure 5.5.10 Established carriers' coverage and penetration v. new entrants' coverage and penetration

 

Figure 6.1.1 Internet applications - bandwidth requirements 174

Figure 6.1.2 Broadband availability (percentage of households)

Figure 6.1.3 Broadband availability v. broadband subscriptions, 2012

Figure 6.1.4 Broadband, 5 Mbps availability (percentage of households), 2012

Figure 6.1.5 Broadband availability by speed (percentage of households)

Figure 6.1.6 Broadband availability - Urban v. rural, 2012 (percentage of households)

 

Figure 6.2.1 Canadian online advertising revenues 184

Figure 6.2.2 Cycle of consumer adoption / Product life cycle

Figure 6.2.3 Popular Internet activities for Canadian Internet users

Figure 6.2.4 Percentage of Canadians viewing TV and accessing the Internet concurrently

Figure 6.2.5 TV and Internet video viewing by consumers

Figure 6.2.6 Type of devices used by Internet TV viewers

Figure 6.2.7 Average weekly hours spent watching Internet TV

Figure 6.2.8 Percentage of Canadians subscribing to Netflix

Figure 6.2.9 Canadian Netflix Subscribers by region

Figure 6.2.10 Audio technology (excluding conventional radio) usage by consumers

Figure 6.2.11 Podcast usage in Canada, by language group

Figure 6.2.12 Podcast users who listen to AM/FM podcasts, by language group

Figure 6.2.13 Percentage of Canadians streaming AM/FM radio, by language group

Figure 6.2.14 Popular online streamed audio services accessed by consumers, by language group

Figure 6.2.15 Satellite radio subscriptions, by language group

Figure 6.2.16 Mobile device penetration

Figure 6.2.17 Mobile device penetration by region

Figure 6.2.18 Popular Internet and mobile activities for Canadian smartphone owners, by language group

Figure 6.2.19 Popular Internet and mobile activities for Canadian tablet owners

 

Figure 7.1.1 Telecommunications revenues, by market sector, 2012 201

Figure 7.1.2 Global telecommunicationsretail revenues, by region, 2012

Figure 7.1.3 Global telecommunications retail revenues, by market sector

Figure 7.1.4 Average monthly telecommunications retail revenues, 2012

Figure 7.1.5 Broadband and mobile service penetration for a select number of countries, 2012

Figure 7.1.6 Fixed broadband subscriptions, by technology, for a select number of countries, 2012

Figure 7.1.7 Fixed broadband average measured speeds

Figure 7.1.8 Mobile broadband average measured speeds

Figure 7.1.9 Smart connected devices - global market share by category

Figure 7.1.10 Wireless ARPU - monthly revenues, including data share, for a select number of countries, 2012

Figure 7.1.11 Percentage of households accessing pay-TV v. free-to-air, for a select number of countries, 2012

Figure 7.1.12 Percentage of households accessing digital v, analog television, for a select number of countries, 2012

Figure 7.1.13 Global IPTV subscribers, by region, 2012

Figure 7.1.14 Percentage of, and number of, TV households, by platform for a select number of countries, 2012

List of maps

Map 5.5.1 Wireless service availability, by number of facilities-based providers, 2012

Map 5.5.2 Wireless HSPA+ service availability, by number of facilities-based providers, 2012