Communications Monitoring Report 2014: Canadians at the centre of the communications system

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2.0 Canadians at the centre of the communications system

a) Focus on Canadians

The CRTC places Canadians at the centre of the communication system, as citizens, creators, and consumers. The section provides an overview of issues of particular importance to Canadians, including expenditures on communication services, the degree to which they are connected, and reduction in the number of unwanted telemarketing calls and faxes from telemarketers. This section also presents highlights of the contribution and expenditure regimes for Canadian content.

What are the characteristics of the average Canadian household?

Based on Statistics Canada’s 2012 Survey of Household Spending, in 2012, the average household annual income before tax in Canada was $79,943. The average household annual income before tax ranged from $67,030 to $73,260 for households east of Ontario and from $73,672 to $106,846 for households in Ontario and west of Ontario. Households in Alberta had the highest average household annual income before tax at $106,846, followed by households in Ontario at $84,145.

From the perspective of income quintiles (each 20% of households by average annual income), the first quintile had an average annual income of $16,686. This quintile had an average of 1.46 members per household. The highest income in this quintile was $27,402. The third quintile had an average annual income of $61,330. It had an average of 2.51 members. The highest income in this quintile was $74,528. The top 20% of households had annual incomes in excess of $111,864. The average annual income for this quintile was $190,383. This quintile had an average of 3.41 members per household.

b) Contribution and expenditure regimes

The Commission uses a number of approaches to achieve the cultural, social, and economic objectives set out in the Broadcasting Act. One such instrument has been the establishment of various contribution and expenditure regimes.

In 2013, the broadcasting industry contributed $3.2 billion toward the achievement of these objectives.

Table 2.0.1
Summary of funding and television programming expenditures ($ millions)
  2012 2013 Annual growth (%)
Funding / contribution regimes CCD reported by commercial radio and audio services 55 52 -4.9
BDU
CMF, local expression and  independent funds 383 391 2.2
LPIF 112 75 -33
BDU total 495 467 -5.8
PPV and VOD (CMF and independent funds) 11 11 1.4
Expenditures Television CPE 2,861 2,704 -5.5

Source: CRTC data collection

c) Communication with Canadians

In 2013, the Commission received over 34,000 contacts from Canadians. In 60% of these cases, Canadians voiced their opinions about telecommunications services, and in 32%, about broadcasting services.

Table 2.0.2
Number of contacts by the public
2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Broadcasting-related enquiries1 7,131 5,747 6,261 5,829 6,358 4,802
Broadcasting-related complaints1 11,851 12,740 10,813 12,419 11,507 11,055
Telecommunications-related communications2 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 25,153

1. For the 12-month period from 1 April to 31 March.
2. For the 12-month period from 1 January to 31 December.
Source: CRTC correspondence tracking system (the Rapids tracking system counts multiple communications from the same client on the same complaint as separate units; therefore, the actual number of complaints received should be slightly lower).

d) Connections

What are “connections?”

A “connection” refers to access via a subscription to one or more of the following four basic services: local telephone service, Internet access service, wireless service, and broadcast distribution services such as cable, direct-to-home, or Internet Protocol television (IPTV).

The average number of communications connections per Canadian household increased from 4.3 in 2009 to 4.5 in 2013, resulting in an annual growth rate of 0.7%. This was driven by growth in:

The growth in connections per household was partially offset by a 3.3% decline in local telephone connections per household, from 0.95 in 2009 to 0.83 in 2013.

Table 2.0.3
Number of household connections (millions)
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 CAGR (%)
2009-2013
Local and access 12.7 12.6 12.3 12.0 11.7 -2.1
Percentage growth -2.3 -0.8 -2.7 -2.7 -2.2  
Internet 10.1 10.4 10.7 11.0 11.3 2.8
Percentage growth 2.6 3.1 2.9 3.0 2.3  
Mobile wireless 23.7 25.6 27.1 27.9 28.5 4.7
Percentage growth 7.8 7.8 5.8 3.1 2.2  
Cable distribution 11.2 11.5 11.8 11.9 11.9 1.6
Percentage growth 2.1 2.9 2.5 1.0 -0.1  
Total connections 57.7 60.1 61.8 62.8 63.4 2.4
Percentage growth 3.4 4.1 2.9 1.5 1.0  
Average connections per household 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.5 0.7
Percentage growth 3.2 1.9 1.0 1.3 -1.3  

Source: CRTC data collection

Figure 2.0.1 Residential connections, by type of connection

This bar line chart shows the percentage residential connections by type of connection from 2009 to 2013.  Wireline telephone: 22.0, 21.0, 19.9, 19.0 and 18.5; Internet: 17.4, 17.3, 17.3, 17.5 and 17.7; Wireless: 41.1, 42.6, 43.8, 44.5 and 45.0; BDU: 19.4, 19.2, 19.1 19.0 and 18.8.

Source: CRTC data collection

This bar graph displays the percentage distribution of connections by service. In 2013, the percentage of mobile wireless connections was over twice that of either wireline telephone or Internet or BDU connections. Each type of connection accounted for less than 20% of total connections.

Mobile wireless connections include residential and business connections, and mobile wireless subscriptions with data plans.

Table 2.0.4
Number of subscriptions with bundled services (millions)
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 CAGR %
2009-2013
Number of subscriptions with bundles 7.5 8.8 9.4 10.0 10.4 8.6
Annual growth 30.4% 17.1% 6.4% 6.3% 4.1%  

Source: CRTC data collection

This table displays the number of subscriptions by Canadians to bundled services for the period from 2009 to 2013. The subscriptions include two or more of the following services: local telephone, Internet, mobile wireless, and cable distribution. Bundles including long distance and calling features were not considered in this analysis.

In 2013, there were over 10.4 million subscriptions to bundled services for which there was a monthly reduction in price for the bundle.

e) Communication services to official-language minority communities

The CRTC is required, under section 41 of the Official Languages Act, to ensure that positive measures are taken to enhance the vitality of the English- and French-language minority communities in Canada, to support and assist in their development, and to foster the full recognition and use of both English and French in Canadian society.

These objectives are reflected in the Section 3 of the Broadcasting Act which sets out the broadcasting policy that the CRTC must strive to implement through its supervision and regulation of the Canadian broadcasting system. A number of the policy objectives set out in the Broadcasting Act focus on the creation of a broadcasting system that accounts for the French and English linguistic duality of Canada and that is reflective of the particular needs and circumstances of English- and French-language minority communities.

Similarly, the Telecommunications Act sets out a number of telecommunications policy objectives of relevance to the English- and French-language minority community members in Canada.

The purpose of this section is to provide details on the access by official-language minority community members to communication services in their official language.

Map 2.0.1 Locations of official-language minority communities

This map displays the locations of communities that contain a school servicing official-language minority communities.

Source: Canadian Heritage, based on data from the Fédération nationale des conseils scolaires francophones; the Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport du Québec; and CRTC data analysis

This map displays the locations of communities that contain a school servicing official-language minority communities. Official-language minority communities are located all over Canada. Over 85% are located in Ontario, Quebec, and the Atlantic provinces.

A number of different criteria can be used to identify the language of individuals. These include the first language learned at home, the language spoken at home, and the language of education.

For the purpose of this report, the percentages of official-language minority population are based on the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the 2011 Census.

The data excludes institutional residents.

Table 2.0.5
Percentage of official-language minority population by province and territory (2012)
Province/territory Percentage of official-language minority (population)
British Columbia 1.4
Alberta 2.0
Saskatchewan 1.7
Manitoba 3.6
Ontario 4.0
Quebec 8.0
New Brunswick 31.6
Nova Scotia 3.5
Prince Edward Island 3.8
Newfoundland and Labrador 0.5
The North 2.8
Canada 4.8

Source: 2011 Census, Statistics Canada

This table displays the percentage of the population whose mother tongue is an official language in minority status in each province and territory. In all provinces and territories except Quebec, the official language having minority status is French. New Brunswick has the highest percentage of official-language minority population, at 32%, and next is Quebec, at 8.0%.

Official-language minority communities have access to content in their official language to varying degrees. Over 72% of official-language minority community households have access to over-the-air radio service and 62% to television services, generally provided by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Households in these communities have access to the following additional communication services: cable distribution, broadband Internet, and mobile wireless broadband services. Through these services, official-language minority community households can access content and connect with others in their first official language.

The challenge faced by official-language minority communities consists of accessing local community content in their minority language. Although this report does not measure local programming, an indicator of the extent to which official-language minority community households are served in their official language is their access to local radio and television services which is outlined in the table that follows.

Table 2.0.6
Percentage of official-language minority households having access to communication services in their minority language, by area and by service (2013)
Province/territory Radio Television Cable distribution (excluding DTH) Broadband Internet Mobile wireless broadband
British Columbia 71 49 94 96 98
Alberta 77 33 90 99 99
Saskatchewan 55 17 74 99 99
Manitoba 78 62 75 99 99
Ontario 71 34 88 97 99
Quebec 83 87 93 96 99
New Brunswick 94 46 93 99 99
Nova Scotia 75 1 76 99 99
Prince Edward Island 64 0 60 86 99
Newfoundland and Labrador 56 0 82 85 95
The North 51 0 75 97 84
Canada 72 62 91 97 99

Source: 2011 Census, Statistics Canada; CRTC data collection; and CRTC staff analysis

This table displays the percentages of the official-language minority community households in each province and territory that have access to radio services; television services; cable distribution services, excluding satellite direct-to-home service since these services are generally available to all households; broadband Internet services; and mobile wireless broadband services, from which they can be served in their first official language.

f) Telephone penetration rates

Since 2009, the telephone penetration rate, which is a measure of the extent to which households subscribe to telephone service (including both wireline and mobile wireless telephone services), has remained relatively constant at 99.2 subscribers per 100 households. However, from 2009 to 2012, the number of households with wireline telephone service has declined from 89.3 to 83.5 subscribers per 100 households, whereas the number of households with mobile wireless service has increased from 77.2 to 81.4 subscribers per 100 households.

The mobile wireless penetration rate was highest in Alberta, at 90.1 subscribers per
100 households, followed by Ontario, at 83.9 subscribers per 100 households.
In both provinces, the mobile wireless penetration rate exceeded the respective wireline penetration rates.

Table 2.0.7
Provincial telephone penetration rates – Wireline and mobile wireless subscribers per 100 households (2012)
Province Wireline Mobile wireless Wireline and/or mobile wireless Wireline only Mobile wireless only
British Columbia 79.4 83.7 98.9 15.2 19.5
Alberta 80.7 90.1 99.6 9.5 18.9
Saskatchewan 83.9 84.2 98.9 14.7 15.0
Manitoba 83.1 80 99.8 19.8 16.7
Ontario 82.4 83.9 99.3 15.4 16.9
Quebec 87.5 70.4 99.1 28.7 11.6
New Brunswick 88.2 79.4 99.5 20.1 11.3
Nova Scotia 85.4 80 99.4 19.4 14
Prince Edward Island 85.1 79.2 98.2 19 13.1
Newfoundland and Labrador 88.9 83.3 99.4 16.1 10.5
Canada 83.5 81.4 99.2 17.8 15.7

Source: Statistics Canada’s Survey of Household Spending

This table displays the penetration rates of wireline and mobile wireless services on a per-100-household basis, by province. The “wireline” and “mobile wireless service” columns present the number of households on a per-100-household basis that have at least one wireline or mobile wireless telephone service. The “wireline and/or mobile wireless” column presents the number of households on a per-100-household basis that have at least one telephone service, either wireline or mobile wireless or both.

Data for 2013 was not available. The results of Statistics Canada’s Survey of Household Spending are released approximately two years after the data is collected.

The quintile of Canadian households with the lowest household income also had the lowest telephone penetration rate at 97.4. This quintile had the highest telephone penetration rate among subscribers to only wireline service (35.7) and among subscribers to only mobile wireless telephone service (22.8). As household income increased, the number of wireless-only and wireline-only households decreased because households tended to have both wireline and wireless services.

Table 2.0.8
Canadian telephone penetration rates – Wireline and mobile wireless subscribers per 100 households
Year Wireline Mobile wireless Wireline and/or mobile wireless Wireline only Mobile wireless only
2002 97.0 51.6 98.7 47.1 1.7
2003 96.3 53.9 98.8 44.9 2.5
2004 96.2 58.9 98.9 40.0 2.7
2005 94.0 n/a 98.8 n/a 4.8
2006 93.6 66.8 98.6 31.8 5.0
2007 92.5 71.9 98.8 26.9 6.3
2008 91.1 74.3 99.1 24.8 8.0
2009 89.3 77.2 99.3 22.1 10.0
2010 89.1 78.2 99.3 21.1 10.2
2011 86.5 79.4 99.3 19.9 12.8
2012 83.5 81.4 99.2 17.8 15.7

Sources: Statistics Canada’s Affordability Study (2002-2007) and Survey of Household Spending (2008-2012)

This table displays the penetration rates of wireline and mobile wireless services on a per-100-household basis. The “wireline” and “mobile wireless” columns present the number of households on a per-100-household basis that have at least one wireline or mobile wireless telephone service. The “wireline and/or mobile wireless” column presents the number of households on a per-100-household basis that have at least one telephone service, either wireline or mobile wireless or both.

Data for 2013 were not available. The results of Statistics Canada’s Survey of Household Spending are released approximately two years after the data is collected.

Table 2.0.9  Canadian telephone penetration rates by income quintile – Wireline and mobile wireless subscribers per 100 households
Income quintile Year Wireline Mobile wireless Wireline and/or mobile wireless Wireline only Mobile wireless only
First 2010 82.2 54.9 97.3 42.4 15.1
2011 76.0 57.3 97.3 40.0 21.3
Percentage change -7.5 4.4 0.0 -5.7 41.1
2012 74.6 61.7 97.4 35.7 22.8
Percentage change -1.8 7.7 0.1 -10.8 7.0
Second 2010 85.7 71.1 99.7 28.6 14.0
2011 86.0 72.3 99.8 27.5 13.8
Percentage change 0.4 1.7 0.1 -3.8 -1.4
2012 80.3 75.1 99.5 24.4 19.2
Percentage change -6.6 3.9 -0.3 -11.3 39.1
Third 2010 89.3 82.0 99.8 17.8 10.5
2011 85.1 85.3 99.7 14.4 14.6
Percentage change -4.7 4.0 -0.1 -19.1 39.0
2012 82.8 85.9 99.7 13.8 16.9
Percentage change -2.7 0.7 0.0 -4.2 15.8
Fourth 2010 93.1 89.7 99.9 10.2 6.8
2011 91.3 89.8 99.9 10.1 8.6
Percentage change -1.9 0.1 0.0 -1.0 26.5
2012 87.4 91.0 99.8 8.8 12.4
Percentage change -4.3 1.3 -0.1 -12.9 44.2
Fifth 2010 95.3 93.5 100.0 6.5 4.7
2011 94.1 92.0 100.0 8.0 5.9
Percentage change -1.3 -1.6 0.0 23.1 25.5
2012 92.4 93.4 99.7 6.3 7.3
Percentage change -1.8 1.5 -0.3 -21.3 23.7
All households 2010 89.1 78.2 99.3 21.1 10.2
2011 86.5 79.4 99.3 19.1 12.8
Percentage change -2.9 1.5 0.0 -5.7 25.5
2012 83.5 81.4 99.2 17.8 15.7
Percentage change -3.5 2.5 -0.1 -6.8 22.7

Source: Statistics Canada’s Survey of Household Spending

This table displays the penetration rates of wireline and mobile wireless services on a per-100-household basis, by quintile. The “wireline” and “mobile wireless” columns present the number of households on a per-100-household basis that have at least one wireline or mobile wireless telephone service. The “wireline and/or mobile wireless” column presents the number of households on a per-100-household basis that have at least one telephone service, either wireline or mobile wireless or both.

Data for 2013 were not available. The results of Statistics Canada’s Survey of Household Spending are released approximately two years after the data is collected.

The upper bounds for the first to fourth quintiles are approximately: $27K, $48K, $74K, and $112K.

g) Residential communication service prices

What’s in a basket?

Telephone basket

The Telephone Price Index (TPI) reflects the price changes experienced over time by a household for a basket of telephone services. This type of basket reflects a weighted average of consumer expenditures on basic local service, other local telephone services (such as options and features), and long distance, installation, and repair services. The TPI does not include Internet service expenditures.

Cable, satellite, and IPTV basket

The BDU price index reflects the price changes experienced over time by a household for a basket of cable television services. This basket includes both “basic” and “extended” cable services. Basic cable service is the minimum service to which all customers must subscribe. Extended cable service is the most popular package of additional channels. The BDU index does not account for bundling discounts.

The price of communication services generally increased in 2013. The price of baskets of telephone service; cable, satellite, and Internet Protocol television (IPTV) distribution services; and Internet access services exceeded the rate of inflation, as measured by the change in the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In 2013, inflation was 0.9% whereas: the price of a basket of telephone services increased 1.6%; the price of a basket of cable, satellite, and IPTV distribution services increased 2.4%; and the price of a basket of Internet access services increased 3.7%.

Figure 2.0.2 Price indices TPI, BDU (cable, satellite, and IPTV, including pay television), Internet access services, and CPI

This line chart shows the following price indices from 2002 to 2013 Consumer price index (CPI): 100, 102.8, 104.7, 107, 109.1, 111.5, 114.1, 114.4, 116.5, 119.9, 121.7, and 122.8; Telephone price index (TPI): 100, 100.2, 100.6, 101, 100.9, 101.6, 105.9, 106.5, 111.2, 112.3, 114.6 and 116.4; Cablevision and satellite services (including pay television) index: 100, 104.8, 108.8, 112.5, 116.8. 122.7, 128.7, 135.8, 143.4, 151.4, 159.0 and 162.8; Internet access services index: 100, 99.1, 99, 97.1, 96.7, 97.5, 95.8, 94.8, 95.8, 100.9, 105.2 and 109.1.

Source: Statistics Canada

This graph displays the Consumer Price Index (CPI) and the price indices for a basket of each of telephone, BDU, and Internet access services from 2002 to 2013.

The CPI is an indicator of the changes in consumer prices experienced by the target population. The CPI measures price changes by comparing, over time, the cost of a fixed basket of goods and services.

h) Consumers’ expenditures on communication services

What do communication service expenditures include?

Communication services include local telephone (such as custom calling features, installation, and repair services), long distance, Internet, wireless, and BDU services.

Sales tax is excluded from the analysis of communication service expenditures.

Canadians increased their expenditures on communication services from $185 per month per household in 2012 to $191 in 2013, a 3.2% increase. The increase was largely due to higher spending on wireless and Internet services, which increased 2.8% and 14.3%, respectively. Higher spending on these services was largely due to increased consumption of mobile wireless data and increased demand for higher broadband Internet speeds.

 Canadians reduced their spending on landline telephony service from $34.86 per month per household to $32.86, resulting in a 5.8% reduction. Contributing factors include the adoption of wireless services and the elimination of second landline telephone service in households. In 2013, there were, on average, two mobile wireless subscriptions per household.

In 2013, Canadian households tended to spend the least on wireline telephone services, which represented 17.2% of their expenditures on communication services, compared to 36.3% on wireless services. Households in the lowest income quintile tended to allocate most of their communications expenditures to cable and direct-to-home (DTH) services ($37.45 per month per household), followed by mobile wireless service ($34.92 per month per household); whereas households in the highest income quintile favoured mobile wireless telephony services ($109.50 per month per household), followed by cable and DTH services ($71.58 per month per household).

Table 2.0.10
Household communications expenditures as a percentage of annual income, by quintile (2012
Characteristics Lowest quintile (household income less than $27,875) Second quintile (household income from $27,875 to $48,426) Third quintile (household income from $48,426 to $74,032) Fourth quintile (household income from $74,032 to $111,639) Highest quintile (household income over $111,639) Total average
Average annual income $17,312 $37,937 $60,559 $90,855 $179,659 $77,269
Members per household 1.47 2.10 2.57 2.90 3.34 2.48
Percentage recently changed address   (2010-2011) 25.6% 20.4% 19.3% 14.5% 9.7% 17.9%
Communications expenditures as a percentage of annual income 8.4% 4.7% 3.6% 2.8% 1.7% 2.8%

Sources: Statistics Canada’s Survey of Household Spending

This table provides the average annual income, household size (members per household), percentage of households that have recently moved, and communications expenditures as a percentage of income by quintile.

Table 2.0.11
Monthly household communications expenditures, by service and by quintile ($/month/household)
Service Year Lowest quintile Second quintile Third quintile Fourth quintile Highest quintile All classes
Wireline telephone 2011 33.91 33.51 37.01 42.56 42.39 37.66
2012 29.06 33.05 34.28 37.18 40.73 34.86
Percentage change -14.3 -1.4 -7.4 -12.6 -3.9 -7.4
2013 27.92 30.72 31.38 34.55 39.78 32.85
Percentage change -3.9 -7.0 -8.5 -7.1 -2.3 -5.8
Mobile wireless 2011 31.58 43.33 58.25 73.00 98.50 60.92
2012 32.92 48.58 67.92 80.42 107.08 67.42
Percentage change 4.2 12.1 16.6 10.2 8.7 10.7
2013 34.92 50.33 68.67 83.33 109.5 69.33
Percentage change 6.1 3.6 1.1 3.6 2.3 2.8
Internet 2011 18.45 25.47 31.80 34.65 39.28 29.95
2012 21.42 26.49 33.03 35.64 40.32 30.95
Percentage change 16.1 4.0 3.9 2.9 2.6 3.3
2013 21.48 30.53 39.33 40.95 44.74 35.37
Percentage change 0.3 15.3 19.1 14.9 11.0 14.3
Cable and DTH 2011 37.99 45.76 52.09 59.35 67.11 52.42
2012 35.55 46.93 51.79 55.95 70.00 52.02
Percentage change -6.4 2.6 -0.6 -5.7 4.3 -0.8
2013 37.45 46.77 88.17 60.20 71.58 53.56
Percentage change 5.3 -0.3 70.2 7.6 2.3 3.0
Total communications 2011 121.75 148.03 179.26 209.60 247.34 180.95
2012 118.94 155.04 187.02 209.18 258.14 185.25
Percentage change -2.3 4.7 4.3 -0.2 4.4 2.4
2013 121.76 158.35 227.54 219.03 265.60 191.12
Percentage change 2.4 2.1 21.7 4.7 2.9 3.2

Sources: Statistics Canada’s Survey of Household Spending, CRTC data collection, and staff analysis

This table provides monthly household communications expenditures, by service and by quintile ($/month/household) for 2011, 2012, and 2013. Wireline telephone service excludes equipment sales and rentals.


The data contained in this table were derived by dividing wireline, mobile wireless, Internet, and cable and DTH residential service revenues by the average number of households. The results were then divided by 12 to obtain the monthly amount.

The quintile results were derived by proportioning the results by quintile expenditures in the most recent Statistics Canada Survey of Household Spending (2012).

i) Telemarketing

Since 2008, Canadians have been able to register their telephone numbers on the National Do Not Call List (DNCL) at no cost to reduce the number of unwanted telemarketing calls and faxes they receive. The National DNCL is a key part of the CRTC’s Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules. These rules include the Telemarketing Rules, the National DNCL Rules, and the Automatic Dialing and Announcing Device Rules. Telemarketers and organizations enlisting the  services of telemarketers are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules and for following them.

For the period of 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014, the CRTC issued 29 notices of violation, accompanied by administrative monetary penaltiestotalling just over $1 million. As of 31 March 2014 and since the inception of notices of violation, 91 notices of violation have been issued, with administrative monetary penalties and other payments totalling over $5 million.

Figure 2.0.3 Number of registrations on the National DNCL

This bar line chart shows the number of registrations (in millions) on the National DNCL from 2010 to 2014.  Number of registrants:  8.3, 9.5, 10.7, 11.5 and 12.2; Percentage change for 2011 to 2014 (as a second axis): 14%, 13% and 8% and 6%.

Source: National DNCL operator

This table provides the number of registrations on the National DNCL and the annual growth of the National DNCL for the years 2010 to 2014. All data was for the 12-month period ending on 31 March. The annual growth in the number of Canadians registering their telephone number on the DNCL is declining.

Table 2.0.12
National DNCL key statistics
2011 2012 2013 2014
Number of registrants (millions) 9.5 10.7 11.5 12.2
Percentage change 13.9 12.9 7.7 6.0
Telemarketer access 8,478 9,396 10,228 10,894
Percentage change n/a 10.8 8.9 6.5
Number of complaints (thousands) n/a 133.7 148.8 128.2
Percentage change n/a 11.3 -13.8
Number of complaints (per 1,000 registrants) n/a 12.5 12.9 10.5
Percentage change n/a 3.3 -18.6

Source: CRTC

This table provides key statistics on the National DNCL: the number of registrants on the list, telemarketer access, and the number of complaints in total and per 1,000 registrants for the period from 2011 to 2014. Telemarketer access refers to the number of telemarketers, both domestic and international, that are registered with the National DNCL operator. All data was for the 12-month period ending on 31 March.

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