CRTC Communications Monitoring Report

September 2012


Update to CRTC Communications Monitoring Report - 5 September 2012

Section 4.3 Television market sector:

  • Table 4.3.9 has been modified to address alignment issues and certain discrepancies between the English-language and French-language versions of the Report.

 

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Acknowledgements

The Commission wishes to thank all the entities that completed the CRTC Data Collection forms, without which this report would not have been possible. The Commission would also like to acknowledge the assistance provided by Industry Canada in the analysis of broadband deployment as it related to the rural communities in Canada; Statistics Canada for the various supplementary data used in this report; BBM Canada for audience measures; BBM Analytics for Media Technology Monitor (MTM) syndicated reports; and Mediastats.

Interested parties are welcome to provide comments for improvements or additions to future editions of the report. You can send your comments to the attention of the Secretary General, CRTC, Ottawa, K1A 0N2.

Chairman’s message

I am pleased to present the 2012 Communications Monitoring Report, which provides information on the Canadian communications sector.

Canadians are taking a keen interest in their communications services. This is hardly surprising when you consider that the average household spends over $180 each month on these services. Whether they are watching television, listening to a local radio station, streaming an episode of their favourite show on a tablet, talking to their friends, customers or co-workers, sharing a work they have just created, keeping in touch with their families, reading news online, sending text messages or getting information from their governments, Canadians rely on these services at work, at home and at play.

The Communications Monitoring Report presents data on the financial situation of the industry, the rates of wireless and broadband Internet adoption, the state of competition, the average price of services and many other key indicators. It is an important tool that enables us to gauge whether the industry is meeting the needs of Canadians as citizens, creators and consumers. It also helps us to evaluate whether the CRTC is achieving the objectives entrusted to us by Parliament.

In addition, I hope that this information will assist and inform Canadians’ participation in the CRTC’s proceedings, which are enriched through their involvement.

This document is intended to serve the collective needs of all participants in the Canadian communications system. We welcome suggestions to improve it.

Jean-Pierre Blais

Executive summary

The Canadian communications industry is growing. Revenues from communications services increased 3.3%, rising from $57.4 billion in 2010 to $59.3 billion in 2011. This growth was driven by a 5.5% increase in broadcasting revenues and a 2.5% increase in telecommunications revenues. The communications industry offers services to virtually all Canadian households, which currently number approximately 13.7 million.

Canadians have access to advanced communications services

In 2011, Canadian households spent on average $181 each month on communications services. That figure accounts for approximately 4.1% of total household spending, and is equal to the amount households spend on healthcare. Approximately half of such spending was on mobile and Internet services. The remainder was on television and wireline telephone services.

More than 99% of Canadian households subscribe to a telephone service. However, Canadians are gradually shifting from landline services to wireless services. Over the past four years, the proportion of landline-only subscribers declined from 26.9% in 2007 to 21.1% in 2010. Over the same period, mobile service was adopted by more than 78.2% of households, up from 71.9% in 2007. In 2010, 10.2% of households relied on mobile service only.

The communications industry facilitates such technological growth by continually investing in its infrastructure. For example, by 2011, virtually all Canadian households had access to broadband Internet services of at least 1.5 megabits per second (Mbps), delivered by landline, mobile (HSPA+ and LTE) and satellite facilities. Moreover, the availability of higher-speed broadband services (between 30 and 50 Mbps) has increased from 30% to 75% in the last two years. In 2011, 72% of Canadians had access to four broadband platforms: digital subscriber line (DSL), cable, fixed-wireless/satellite and mobile.

As a result of such high prevalence, more Canadians than ever are actively participating in the digital economy. In 2011, 72% of households subscribed to 1.5 Mbps broadband Internet service, compared to 68% in 2010. Moreover, 54% of households subscribed to services of 5 Mbps or greater (compared to 51% in 2010).

Canadians are also using mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, to access broadband services. Forty-eight percent of wireless devices in the marketplace are equipped to provide this access, whether through a handheld or dedicated data device. 

Broadcasting revenue increases in all sectors

Broadcasting revenues went from $15.8 billion in 2010 to $16.6 billion in 2011. All sectors of the industry experienced growth:

  • cable and satellite revenues increased 5.8% from $8.1 billion to $8.6 billion;
  • pay, pay-per-view, video-on-demand and specialty service revenues increased 7.9% from $3.5 billion to $3.7 billion;
  • conventional television revenues (including those from the CBC) increased 2.2% from $2.6 billion to $2.7 billion; and
  • radio revenues increased 3.9% from $1.5 billion to $1.6 billion.

Telecommunications revenue up, but there were declines

Telecommunications revenues increased 2.5%, from $41.7 billion in 2010 to $42.7 billion in 2011. This increase was due to a rise in revenues for newer data services and broadband Internet and wireless services. Collectively, these service revenues increased by 6.8% from $26.6 billion in 2010 to $28.4 billion in 2011. Individually, revenues for newer data services increased 12.2%, from $1.8 billion to $2.1 billion, Internet service revenues increased 6.4% from $6.8 billion to $7.2 billion, and wireless revenues increased 6.2% from $18.0 billion to $19.1 billion.

These increases were partially offset by decreases in long-distance revenues (down 13.1% from $3.4 billion to $3.0 billion), legacy data and private-line revenues (down 2.9% from $2.5 billion to $2.4 billion), and local and access revenues (down 2.1% from $9.1 billion to $8.9 billion).

Consolidation and regulation in the communications industry

In 2011, the five largest companies in the communications industry captured 83% of revenues. The next five captured 10%. Of these 10 companies, three offered service in all 11 communications markets.1 In so doing, these three companies captured 62% of total industry revenues.

Given this level of industry consolidation, the Commission has acted to ensure these companies do not harm their competitors or restrict consumer choice. For example, some businesses both produce programming and distribute content. To address such situations, the Commission issued a vertical integration policy that ensures:

  • fair treatment for independent broadcasting distribution and programming services that must compete against strong vertically integrated competitors;
  • protection of commercial information; and
  • timely resolution of disputes between parties in the Canadian broadcasting system.

The policy also prohibits companies from offering television programming on an exclusive basis to their mobile or Internet subscribers.

In 2011, companies that operated in multiple markets collectively had 9.4 million subscribers (6.4% more than in 2010) who bought discounted ‘bundled’ services.

Competition is increasing

The competitors of incumbent telephone companies increased their share of overall telecommunications revenues.

The share of total wireline revenues claimed by alternative service providers increased from 37.3% in 2010 to 38.4% in 2011. This group’s market share included the incumbent telephone companies operating outside their traditional territories (relatively unchanged at 6.5%), other facilities-based providers such as cable companies and hydro utility companies (up from 24.5% in 2010 to 25.6% in 2011) and resellers (which remained the same at 6.3%).

Overall, competitors experienced strong growth in the number of residential local lines (which increased 5.7% to 4.7 million) and business lines (which increased 24.7% to 1.4 million). Cable companies, in particular, have become important competitors in this market. Since they began providing local telephone service in 2005, these companies have captured 33% of local residential lines.

Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) offers an alternative to the traditional circuit-switched telephone system. In 2011, there were 4.4 million retail VoIP local telephone lines, representing 24% of retail local lines. Approximately 350,000 of these lines were access independent, allowing consumers to access local service remotely with an Internet connection.

Cable companies are also major providers of high-speed Internet service. In 2011, they served approximately 57% of high-speed residential Internet subscribers.

New wireless entrants captured approximately 4% of wireless subscribers and 2% of revenues in 2011. Overall, the number of wireless subscribers increased by 6.0% in 2011 compared to 8.5% in 2010. Average per-subscriber revenues increased 0.2% (from $57.86 to $57.98 in 2011) due in large part to increased data usage.

Radio broadcasters offer choice to listeners

In 2011, there were 1,183 radio and audio services in Canada. Of that total, 76% broadcasted to English-language Canadians, 21% to French-language Canadians, and 3% to third-language Canadians. In addition, the Commission approved the operation of 30 new radio stations.

Television viewership statistics are strong

Overall viewing of programs on Canadian English-language services was 83.0% in 2011, while viewing of programs on French-language services remained relatively unchanged at 92.2%. Although Canadians preferred drama and comedy programs, they most often consumed non-Canadian content. In 2011, 81% of English and 70% of French-language drama and comedy programs were non-Canadian, respectively.

Television distributors’ market share is growing: IPTV is making gains

Growth in the television distribution market continues to be strong. In 2011, approximately 90% of Canadian households subscribed to a television distribution service, 2.2% more than in 2010. Among households that had a television subscription, 24.5% subscribed to either a satellite or multipoint distribution provider, 5.6% to an IPTV service and 69.9% to cable.

The availability of IPTV increased from 22% in 2010 to 34% in 2011, resulting in a penetration rate of 14% (compared with a penetration rate of 72% for cable). In 2011, 80% of television subscribers received digital services. The top four television distributors captured 89% of all subscribers in 2011.

In 2011, programming revenues per subscriber per month2 increased by $2.13, or 3.6%, for a total of $61.86.

Digital media revenues come from advertising and subscriptions

In a digital media survey conducted by the CRTC, a subset of Canadian communications companies indicated that 62% of their digital media revenues came from advertising and 35% from subscriptions.

Typical weekly users watched, on average, 2.8 hours of Internet TV per week in 2011, an increase from 1.5 hours in 2008. During the same period, the average time Canadian households spent watching Internet TV rose slightly from 0.3 hours to 0.7 hours.

Based on a 2011 MTM consumer survey, 20% of anglophones and 15% of francophones download music from the Internet. Of these, 62% of anglophones and 59% of francophones paid for the content.

Telecommunications technology uptake is strong

Canadians are rapidly embracing new telecommunications technologies. In 2011, the number of mobile phone subscribers increased 6% from the previous year, while the number of residential subscribers to high‑speed Internet services increased by 4.2%. In 2011, approximately 72% of Canadian households had broadband Internet service (at download speed of 1.5 Mbps and above) and 76% had high-speed Internet service (at download speed of 256 kbps and above).

Newer data services that meet business customer requirements for increased speed, functionality and cost-efficiency now represent 93.4% of data protocol revenues. Combined, revenue for data services such as Ethernet and IP-based private networks grew by 12.2% in 2011.

Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction
1.1 Purpose of the report
1.2 Data collection and outline of the report
2.0 The CRTC, policies, and regulation
2.1 The CRTC
2.2 Regulatory oversight of broadcasting and telecommunications
2.3 Contribution and spending regimes
3.0 The Communications service industry
3.1 Overview
4.0 Broadcasting
4.1 Broadcasting - Financial review
4.2 Radio market sector
4.3 Television market sector
4.4 Broadcasting distribution market sector
4.5 Digital media
5.0 Telecommunications
5.1 Financial review
5.2 Wireline voice market sector
5.3 Internet market sector and broadband availability
5.4 Data and private line market sector
5.5 Wireless market sector
6.0 International perspective
6.1 How Canada compares internationally

 

Appendix 1 Data collection and analysis

Appendix 2 Classification of Canadian TSPs

Appendix 3 Status of local forbearance - residential and business exchanges

Appendix 4 International pricing assumptions

Appendix 5 Telecommunications market sector description

Appendix 6 List of acronyms used in the report

Appendix 7 List of decisions, public notices, orders, circulars, and regulatory policies referenced in the report

Appendix 8 List of companies referenced in the report

 

List of diagrams

Diagram 4.0.1 Program Distribution

List of tables

Table 2.2.1 Broadcasting complaints by sector, by issue

Table 2.2.2 Number of contacts by public

Table 2.2.3 Complaints handled by the CBSC

Table 2.2.4 Complaints handled by the ASC

Table 2.2.5 Telecommunications complaints handled by the CCTS

Table 2.2.6 Number of dispute files received

Table 2.2.7 Number of formal broadcasting dispute files received (2011/2012)

Table 2.2.8 Number of Telecommunications dispute resolutions (2011/2012)

Table 2.3.1 LPIF – Contributions and number of recipients

 

Table 3.1.1 Communications revenues ($ billions)

Table 3.1.2 Industry revenues by type of provider

Table 3.1.3 Industry convergence: Cable v. Telecommunications

Table 3.1.4 Percent of broadcasting and telecommunications revenues generated by companies operating in multiple markets

Table 3.1.5 Monthly household communications expenditures by quintile (2011)

 

Table 4.1.1 Broadcasting revenues

Table 4.1.2 Percent of broadcasting revenues generated by companies operating in multiple markets

Table 4.2.1 Number and type of radio and audio services authorized to broadcast in Canada

Table 4.2.2 Number of new over-the-air radio stations approved from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2011

Table 4.2.3 Average weekly hours tuned per capita by age group

Table 4.2.4 Radio tuning share in an average week and average weekly hours tuned by listener for English- and French-language AM and FM bands

Table 4.2.5 Fall tuning achieved by largest English- and French-language private commercial radio operators in Canada

Table 4.2.6 Revenues and number of undertakings reporting financial results for private commercial radio stations – English- and French-language, and Ethnic

Table 4.2.7 CBC radio revenues

Table 4.2.8 English-language and French-language radio revenues and number of undertakings reporting for the largest radio operators in Canada

Table 4.2.9 Revenues for Type B Native, community, and campus radio stations

Table 4.2.10 Value of radio transactions and corresponding tangible benefits for the period 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2011

Table 4.2.11 Summary of annual CCD contributions reported by radio licensees

Table 4.3.1 Number and type of television services authorized to broadcast in Canada

Table 4.3.2 National average weekly viewing hours, by age group

Table 4.3.3 Viewing share of Canadian and non-Canadian services, by language and type of service – All of Canada, excluding the Quebec Francophone market - 2007/2008 – 2010/2011 television seasons

Table 4.3.4 Viewing share of Canadian and non-Canadian services, by language and type of service in the Quebec Francophone market 2007/2008 – 2010/2011 television seasons

Table 4.3.5 Average weekly viewing hours of Canadian programs distributed by Canadian English- and French-language television services, by program origin, genre and region

Table 4.3.6 Average weekly viewing hours of Canadian programs distributed by Canadian English- and French-language private conventional services, by program origin, genre and region

Table 4.3.7 Average weekly viewing hours of Canadian programs distributed by Canadian English- and French-language CBC conventional services, by program origin, genre and region

Table 4.3.8 Average weekly viewing hours of Canadian programs distributed by Canadian English- and French-language pay and specialty services, by program origin, genre and region

Table 4.3.9 Viewing share of Canadian services by ownership group in the English- and French-language markets

Table 4.3.10 Television revenues by type of service

Table 4.3.11 Advertising and other revenues: CBC conventional television stations (owned and operated)

Table 4.3.12 Advertising and other revenues: Private conventional television stations

Table 4.3.13 Revenues: Pay, PPV, VOD and specialty analog and digital services

Table 4.3.14 Ownership groups with significant ownership interest in specialty, pay, PPV, and VOD services as of 31 December 2011

Table 4.3.15 Canadian Programming Expenditure (CPE) - CBC English- and French-language conventional television

Table 4.3.16 Canadian Programming Expenditure (CPE) - Private conventional television

Table 4.3.17 Expenditures on non-Canadian programming - Private conventional television

Table 4.3.18 Expenditures on Canadian and non-Canadian programming by genre reported by pay and specialty services

Table 4.3.19 Canadian programming expenditures (CPE) reported by PPV and VOD services

Table 4.3.20 Number of hours of Canadian priority programming broadcast annually - 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Table 4.3.21 Value of television transactions and corresponding tangible benefits for the period 1 Jan 2007 to 31 December 2011

Table 4.4.1 Broadcasting distribution – Basic and non-basic revenues, subscribers, monthly revenues per subscriber, and percent of households subscribing to BDUs

Table 4.4.2 Top Canadian distributors and number of subscribers

Table 4.4.3 Affiliation payments made to Canadian and non-Canadian pay, PPV, VOD, and specialty services reported by BDUs

Table 4.5.1 Digital media revenues for a subset of digital media broadcasting undertakings

Table 4.5.2 Bandwidth used by online video and audio services

Table 4.5.3 Media technology adoption categorized by life cycle stage in Canada (2011)

Table 4.5.4 Percentage of Canadians using the Internet

Table 4.5.5 Percentage of Canadians using the Internet, by linguistic group

Table 4.5.6 Average weekly hours spent online by Canadians Internet users

Table 4.5.7 Adoption and growth rate of various video technologies in Canada

Table 4.5.8 Adoption and growth rates of various audio technologies in Canada

Table 4.5.9 Mobile device penetration by linguistic group

 

Table 5.1.1 Retail and wholesale telecommunications revenues

Table 5.1.2 Telecommunications revenues, by market sector

Table 5.1.3 Percentage of telecommunications revenues generated by companies operating in multiple markets

Table 5.1.4 Total telecommunications revenues, by type of service provider

Table 5.1.5 Wireline telecommunications revenue market share (%), by type of TSP (2011)

Table 5.1.6 Percentage of revenues from forborne services

Table 5.1.7 Canadian penetration rates – Wireline and wireless subscribers per 100 households

Table 5.1.8 Canadian penetration rates by income quintile – Wireline and wireless subscribers per 100 households (2010)

Table 5.1.9 Number of connections

Table 5.1.10 Number of subscriptions with bundled services

Table 5.1.11 Capex, by type of TSP

Table 5.2.1 Local and access, and long distance revenues, local lines, and long distance minutes

Table 5.2.2 Local and access, and long distance forborne revenues and lines

Table 5.2.3 Local and access revenues, by type of TSP

Table 5.2.4 Local and access lines, by type of TSP

Table 5.2.5 Local and long distance retail monthly revenues per line

Table 5.2.6 Local and access retail monthly revenues ($), per line by type of TSP

Table 5.2.7 Incumbent TSP provincial retail local market share, by line

Table 5.2.8 Incumbent TSP residential and business local market share, by line for major centres

Table 5.2.9 Local wholesale revenues, by major component

Table 5.2.10 Long distance revenues, by type of TSP

Table 5.2.11 Large incumbent TSPs’ retail long distance revenue market share, by region

Table 5.2.12 Long distance retail revenues ($) per minute, by type of TSP

Table 5.3.1 Internet Revenues

Table 5.3.2 Residential Internet subscribers, by type of TSP

Table 5.3.3 Residential Internet plans and pricing

Table 5.3.4 Key telecommunications availability indicators

Table 5.3.5 Broadband availability platforms, by speed and number of platforms (2011)

Table 5.3.6 Broadband availability, by speed and province/territory (2011, percentage of households)

Table 5.3.7 Number of households that can have broadband access

Table 5.4.1 Data and private line revenues

Table 5.4.2 Data protocol revenues, by service category

Table 5.4.3 Data protocol revenue market share, by service category (%)

Table 5.4.4 Private line revenues, by service category

Table 5.4.5 Private line - revenue market share (%)

Table 5.5.1 Wireless and paging revenues and number of subscribers

Table 5.5.2 Wireless and paging revenue components

Table 5.5.3 Prepaid and post paid wireless revenues (basic voice and long distance)

Table 5.5.4 Number of post paid subscribers as a percentage of total wireless subscribers

Table 5.5.5 Wireless subscriber market share, by province (2011)

Table 5.5.6 ARPU, by province (excluding paging)

Table 5.5.7 Average monthly churn rates (percent)

Table 5.5.8 Mobile broadband (2011)

Table 5.5.9 Canadian wireless monthly service rates - incumbents v. new entrants (2011)

Table 5.5.10 Canadian wireless monthly Internet service rates - incumbents v. new entrants (2010)

Table 5.5.11 Coverage, penetration, and ARPU by province (2011)

Table 5.5.12 Percent coverage by the number of facilities-based wireless service providers, by province (2011)

 

Table 6.1.1 International pricing (average price ($) per month)

Table 6.1.2 Average advertised Internet speeds (Mbps) across OECD countries, by access technology

Table 6.1.3 Global shipments of mobile phones

Table 6.1.4 Wireless industry metrics, 2011

Table 6.1.5 Radio industry metrics, 2010

Table 6.1.6 Television industry metrics, 2010

List of figures

Figure 2.3.1 2011 Contributions to CCD reported by commercial radio & audio services

Figure 2.3.2 2011 Television CPE

Figure 2.3.3 Contributions to the creation and production of Canadian programming by BDUs

Figure 2.3.4 LPIF distribution by region and ownership group

Figure 2.3.5 Subsidy paid to LECs and the revenue percent charge

 

Figure 3.1.1 Broadcasting and telecommunications annual revenue growth rates

Figure 3.1.2 Broadcasting and telecommunications revenues for the top 5 group of companies, the next top 5 group and the remaining companies

Figure 3.1.3 Broadcasting and telecommunications revenues by type of provider (2011)

Figure 3.1.4 Commercial broadcasting and telecommunications revenues (Excluding non-programming and exempt services)

Figure 3.1.5 BDU revenues by service type

Figure 3.1.6 BDU – EBITDA margins achieved from all services (programming, exempted and non-programming services)

Figure 3.1.7 Price indices [TPI, BDU (cable and satellite, including pay television), Internet access services, and CPI]

Figure 3.1.8 Household spending by quintile for the 7 highest expenditures

Figure 3.1.9 Canadian broadcasting and telecommunications revenue composition for a select number of large companies

Figure 3.1.10 Broadcasting and telecommunications operating platforms

Figure 3.1.11 Regulatory considerations in a converging industry

 

Figure 4.1.1 Broadcasting revenues for the top 5 group of companies, the next top 5 group and the remaining companies

Figure 4.1.2 Commercial radio revenues, by broadcaster

Figure 4.1.3 Commercial television revenues, by broadcaster

Figure 4.1.4 BDU revenues, by operator

Figure 4.1.5 Total broadcasting revenues and PBIT/EBITDA margins

Figure 4.2.1 Type of radio and audio services authorized to broadcast in Canada (2011)

Figure 4.2.2 Radio tuning share in an average week in diary markets

Figure 4.2.3 Radio tuning shares - English-language station formats in diary markets

Figure 4.2.4 Radio tuning shares - French-language station formats in diary markets

Figure 4.2.5 Radio tuning shares - English-language station formats in PPM markets

Figure 4.2.6 Radio tuning shares - French-language station formats in PPM markets

Figure 4.2.7 Revenues - Private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.8 Average annual revenues and PBIT per station – Private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.9 PBIT and PBIT margin – Private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.10 Revenues – English-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.11 Average annual revenues and PBIT per station – English-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.12 PBIT and PBIT margin – English-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.13 Revenues – French-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.14 Average annual revenues and PBIT per station – French-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.15 PBIT and PBIT margin – French-language private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.16 Revenues – Ethnic private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.17 Average annual revenues and PBIT per station – Ethnic private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.2.18 PBIT and PBIT margin – Ethnic private commercial radio stations

Figure 4.3.1 Television revenues: CBC and private conventional television, pay, PPV, VOD, and specialty services

Figure 4.3.2 Source of revenues for private conventional television (2011)

Figure 4.3.3 Ranking by revenue for individual Pay, PPV, VOD and specialty services in descending order

Figure 4.3.4 Aggregrate PBIT margins for private conventional television, pay, PPV & VOD services, analog, digital Category 1 and Category 2 specialty services

Figure 4.3.5 Revenues of English-language private conventional television, specialty, pay, PPV, and VOD services

Figure 4.3.6 Aggregate PBIT margins for English-language private conventional television, pay, PPV, VOD, and specialty services

Figure 4.3.7 Revenues of French-language private conventional television, specialty, pay, PPV, and VOD services

Figure 4.3.8 Aggregate PBIT of French-language private conventional television, pay, PPV, VOD, and specialty services

Figure 4.3.9 Revenues of ethnic and third-language specialty and digital Category 2 pay services

Figure 4.3.10 PBIT margins of ethnic and third-language specialty and digital Category 2 pay services

Figure 4.3.11 Revenues of large English-language private conventional television ownership groups

Figure 4.3.12 Revenues of large French-language private conventional television ownership groups

Figure 4.3.13 Advertising revenues: CBC conventional television stations (owned & operated)

Figure 4.3.14 Canadian Programming expenditures (CPE) - distribution by genre for private conventional television (2011)

Figure 4.4.1 Percent of revenues and subscribers by type of distribution platform in 2011

Figure 4.4.2 Percentage of BDU subscribers receiving digital and non-digital services

Figure 4.4.3 EBITDA margins achieved from basic and non-basic programming services

Figure 4.4.4 Contributions to the CMF, LPIF, other independent funds and expenditures on local expression (community channels) reported by BDUs

Figure 4.5.1 Canadian online advertising revenues

Figure 4.5.2 Canadian mobile advertising revenues

Figure 4.5.3 Internet applications – bandwidth requirements

Figure 4.5.4 Cycle of consumer adoption / Product life cycle

Figure 4.5.5 Popular Internet activities for Canadian Internet users

Figure 4.5.6 Percent of Canadians viewing TV and accessing the Internet concurrently

Figure 4.5.7 TV and Internet video viewing penetration

Figure 4.5.8 Type of devices used by Internet video viewers

Figure 4.5.9 Average weekly hours spent watching Internet TV

Figure 4.5.10 Percent of Canadians subscribing to Netflix

Figure 4.5.11 Canadian Netflix Subscribers by region

Figure 4.5.12 Hours of TV and Netflix viewing

Figure 4.5.13 Audio technology (excluding conventional radio) penetration

Figure 4.5.14 Podcast usage in Canada

Figure 4.5.15 Podcast users who listen to AM/FM podcasts

Figure 4.5.16 Percent of Canadians downloading music

Figure 4.5.17 Percent of Canadians downloading music who pay for the downloads

Figure 4.5.18 Percent of Canadians streaming AM/FM radio

Figure 4.5.19 Services streamed by users of streamed audio

Figure 4.5.20 Satellite radio subscriptions

Figure 4.5.21 Mobile device penetration

Figure 4.5.22 Mobile device penetration by region

Figure 4.5.23 Popular Internet and mobile activities for Canadian smartphone owners

 

Figure 5.1.1 Telecommunications revenues and annual growth

Figure 5.1.2 Annual revenue growth, by market sector (2011)

Figure 5.1.3 Residential IP-provisioned service revenues

Figure 5.1.4 Distribution of telecommunications revenues, by market sector

Figure 5.1.5 Total telecommunications revenue market share, by type of TSP (2011)

Figure 5.1.6 Total telecommunications revenue market share, by type of TSP (2011)

Figure 5.1.7 Total business market wireline revenue distribution, by customer size and type of TSP (2011)

Figure 5.1.8 Telecommunications revenues for the top 5 group of companies, the next top 5 group of companies and the remaining companies

Figure 5.1.9 Telecommunications revenues and EBITDA margins

Figure 5.1.10 Capex as a percentage of revenues, by type of TSP (includes AWS expenditures in 2008)

Figure 5.1.11 Wireline wholesale service revenues – Regulated and non-regulated (2011)

Figure 5.1.12 Wireline regulated wholesale service revenues (2011)

Figure 5.2.1 Alternative TSP local retail lines (excluding incumbent out-of-territory), by type of facility

Figure 5.2.2 Alternative TSP local residential and business lines, by type of facility (2011)

Figure 5.2.3 Large incumbent TSPs’ pay telephone revenues and quantities

Figure 5.2.4 Access independent and access dependent retail VoIP local lines (2011)

Figure 5.2.5 Fibre-based lines, FTTN and FTTH, percentage of total lines (2011)

Figure 5.2.6 Local business market revenue distribution, by customer size and type of provider (2011)

Figure 5.2.7 Long distance business market revenue distribution, by customer size and type of provider (2011)

Figure 5.3.1 Internet access revenue share, by type of entity, 2011

Figure 5.3.2 Business Internet access revenues, by access technology (2007 v. 2011)

Figure 5.3.3 GBs downloadable per plan vs. percentage of high-speed residential subscribers

Figure 5.3.4 Residential Internet access technology mix (2007 v. 2011)

Figure 5.3.5 Broadband (greater than 1.5 Mbps) subscriptions

Figure 5.3.6 Broadband availability (percentage of households)

Figure 5.3.7 Broadband availability, by speed (percentage of households)

Figure 5.3.8 Broadband availability – Urban v. rural (percentage of households) (2011)

Figure 5.3.9 Broadband availability v. broadband subscriptions (2011)

Figure 5.4.1 Data and private line revenue market share, by type of TSP

Figure 5.4.2 Data revenue market share, by type of TSP

Figure 5.4.3 Private line revenue market share, by type of TSP

Figure 5.4.4 Data and private line service revenue distribution, by customer size and type of provider (2011)

Figure 5.5.1 Wireless revenues, subscribers, and revenues per subscriber (excluding paging)

Figure 5.5.2 Capex and ACEPU

Figure 5.5.3 Retail and wholesale revenue split (2011)

Figure 5.5.4 Wireless TSPs' subscriber market share

Figure 5.5.5 Wireless TSPs' revenue market share

Figure 5.5.6 Population coverage and penetration (2011)

Figure 5.5.7 Mobile data only plan revenues, subscriptions and average monthly revenues per subscriber, by data plan capacity (2011)

Figure 5.5.8 Total number of MMS and SMS messages

Figure 5.5.9 Established carriers’ coverage v. new entrants’ coverage

Figure 5.5.10 Percent of mobile revenues, by plan (2011)

 

Figure 6.1.1 Telecommunications revenues, by market sector, 2011

Figure 6.1.2 Global telecommunications retail revenues, by region, 2011

Figure 6.1.3 Global telecommunications retail revenues, by market sector, 2007–2011

Figure 6.1.4 Average monthly telecommunications retail revenues, 2011

Figure 6.1.5 International penetration, 2011

Figure 6.1.6 Share of fixed broadband subscriptions, by technology, 2011

Figure 6.1.7 Average measured fixed broadband speeds, 2010 and 2011

Figure 6.1.8 Average measured mobile broadband speeds, 2010 and 2011

Figure 6.1.9 Wireless ARPU – monthly revenues, including data share, 2011

Figure 6.1.10 Proportion of post-paid versus prepaid mobile subscriptions, 2007 and 2011

Figure 6.1.11 Pay TV penetration and growth, 2008–2010

Figure 6.1.12 Digital TV penetration and growth, 2007–2011

Figure 6.1.13 Global IPTV subscribers, by region, 2011

Figure 6.1.14 Distribution of TV households, by platform, 2011

List of maps

Map 5.5.1 Presence of wireless facilities-based service providers

Map 5.5.2 Presence of HSPA+ wireless facilities-based service providers

 



Notes:


[1] The markets consist of five broadcasting markets (radio, television, BDU specialty, and VOD, pay and PPV) and six telecommunications markets (local and access, long distance, Internet, data, private line and wireless)

[2] Revenues per subscriber per month were derived by dividing total revenues by the number of subscribers and by the number of months in the year.