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Communications Monitoring Report 2013: Broadband availability and adoption of digital technologies

 

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6.0 Broadband availability and adoption of digital technologies

Overview

Canadians can access broadband using either wireline or wireless facilities. These facilities are evolving new experiences for Canadians, ranging from those resembling television and radio, to new, highly interactive services and programs offering greater consumer control and choice. Consumers can engage with the digital world with their devices at the time and place of their choosing.

The following sections examine the availability of broadband Internet access service, the capacity requirements that must be met for participating in the digital environment, as well as the requirements impact on consumer behaviour. They also look at certain technologies as they relate to Canada’s broadcasting and telecommunications sectors. As this is a growing and evolving industry, data related to consumer behaviour was gathered primarily from contracted research and publicly available data rather than direct data collection. One of the primary data sources was the MTM Fall 2012 survey, which examined the media habits and technology usage of 8,000 Canadians 18 years of age and older.

6.1  Broadband availability and capacity requirements

This section examines the extent to which Canadians have access to broadband Internet service and the capacity requirements.

Fixed and mobile broadband (i.e., HSPA+) are available to over 99% of households. Canadians are accessing the growing volumes of content, whether audio, video, or data, being made available online. Spurring this development is the availability of multi-function consumer devices.

In 2012, Canadians were served by over 500 Internet service providers. Incumbent TSPs provided Internet services using mainly DSL, fibre-optic, satellite, and fixed-wireless facilities. Cable companies used cable modem, fibre-optic, fixed-wireless and dial-up facilities. Utility telcos, municipalities, and other TSPs provide Internet services using dial-up, DSL, fibre-optic, satellite, and fixed-wireless facilities. Resellers essentially rely on facilities-based TSPs to provide them with facilities on a wholesale basis. Resellers also provide high-speed Internet service, generally using leased DSL facilities and, to a lesser extent, cable-modem and fibre-optic facilities.

Wireless service providers also provide broadband service. As displayed in section 5.5, 52% of wireless subscribers in 2012 had advanced handheld devices capable of accessing the digital world.

Broadband availability at a glance
Residential broadband availability (excluding satellite) 2011 2012
National 97% 97%
Urban 100% 100%
Rural 83% 85%
National, including HSPA+ 99% 99%
  • “Rural” is defined as areas with densities of fewer than 400 people per square kilometre, or population centres with fewer than 1,000 people.

Source: CRTC data collection

Figure 6.1.1 Internet applications – bandwidth requirements

This chart is an illustration attempting to show the amount of bandwidth required for various online applications and services, in order to illustrate the sorts of services that consumers may expect to receive depending on the Internet access service that they use. The X-axis is the Average Available Bandwidth in Mbps, and there are 6 labels along the axis; Dial-up, 128 kbps, 500 kpbs, 1.5 Mbps, 5 Mbps, and 15 Mbps. The Y-axis is Required Performance Consistency, and has 3 labels; Files, Streaming, and Real-Time. Within the body of the chart are various ovals illustrating the type of services and the bandwidth they require. In the “Files” category are the following: E-mail from dial-up to 128 kbps; Small Software Download from 128 kbps to 500 kbps; Music Downloads from 500 kbps to under 1.5 Mbps; Software Download (1 CD) from 1.5 Mbps to 5 Mbps; DVD Size Video Download from 5 Mbps to 15 Mbps; Blu-ray Size Video Download above 15 Mbps. Between the “Files” and “Streaming” categories is Web Surfing, which ranges from Dial-up to 1.5 Mbps. In the “Streaming” category are the following: Radio from dial-up to 140 kbps; Mobile TV from 128 kbps to under 400 kbps; Web Video from under 500 kbps to under 1.5 Mbps; Movie Rental/Purchase Services from 1.5 Mbps to 5 Mbps; HD Video Streaming from 5 Mbps to 15 Mbps. In the “Real-Time” category are the following: VoIP from dial-up to under 128 kbps; Real-Time Gaming from 70 kbps to 500 kbps; Video Conferencing from under 500 kbps to 5 Mbps.

Table 6.1.1 illustrates the Internet access speed requirements for a number of commonly accessed online services. It shows both the average upload and download speeds required by each service. The intention of this table is to give readers an idea of the Internet access speeds that would be required to use various online audio and video services. While some services attempt to send data in short bursts at higher peak rates, they can adapt to differing peak rates, so the average rate is still an important factor in determining the data rate requirements for most services. Testing focused on replicating a typical home environment, and included a variety of consumer electronic devices connected to the Internet through 1) a wired Internet connection or 2) making use of a Wi-Fi network. Services tested over the wired Internet connection were carried out on a Windows-based PC. When carrying out testing over the Wi-Fi network, devices used included an Xbox 360, Apple TV, as well as Android and iOS tablets and smartphones, making use of device-specific apps rather than mobile-friendly websites. In testing the Wi-Fi connected devices, significant differences in the results were noted for some services across devices, and for this reason, a range of speeds and caps has been shown.
 
With the exception of Netflix and YouTube, where video quality is selectable, default settings were used for each device and service being measured. It is worth noting that several services will automatically change the quality (and therefore the amount of data) being delivered based on a user’s Internet connection. Multiple measurements were collected using a variety of tools and techniques, on a relatively “idle” network, without any interfering applications or services.

The differences in test results on the wireless devices reflect the different types of devices, different brands, and even different operating systems in use. Due to the wide range of speeds needed and capacity needed, consumers may benefit from using apps that are available for specific devices to monitor data usage. These can be found by using search terms such as “bandwidth monitor” or “network monitor” in popular app stores operated by Android, Apple, Blackberry, and Windows.

Table 6.1.1   Internet access speed requirements for a number of commonly accessed online services
Application Wired connection Wireless connection
Average download speed (Kbps) Average upload speed (Kbps) Average download speed (Kbps) Average upload speed (Kbps)
Video streaming
Netflix (Good) 630 19.6 554-680 9-14.6
Netflix (Better) 2223 68.6 536-1161 9-14.8
Netflix (Best) 5941 179.2 554-4000 8.9-29.7
Rogers Anyplace TV 3193 104.5 1400-1650 9-23.5
CBC Television 2400-6444 58-167 220-1335 1.5-15.4
Global TV 972 26.0 1396 9.0
YouTube (HD or 720p) 1335 27.7 368-1270 5.3-26
YouTube (480p)1 492 11.2 - -
YouTube (240p) 319 7.3 - -
Audio streaming
Slacker Radio 137 9.6 125-267 1.8-4.8
Live audio
Local (Ottawa) FM radio 34 1.3 34 2.0
CBC radio 130 4.4 96-135 6.0

1. YouTube video quality was fixed and not selectable on the collection of devices connected to wirelessly, e.g., the Xbox 360, Apple TV, as well as Android and iOS tablets and smartphones.

Source: CRTC staff analysis

Table 6.1.2 illustrates the maximum number of hours that a user could use each service under different usage caps based on the information from the previous table. Both upload and download traffic was counted towards the usage cap in calculating these times. The intention of this table is to give readers an idea of how much data is used when enjoying various online audio and video services.

Table 6.1.2 Number of usage hours before reaching various capacity thresholds by service
Application Wired connection Wireless connection
Time to Exhaust (Hours) for: 20GB Cap 60GB Cap 80GB
Cap
20GB
Cap
60GB
Cap
80GB
Cap
Video streaming
Netflix (Good) 68 205 273 64-79 192-237 256-315.5
Netflix (Better) 19 58 78 38-81 114-244 152-325
Netflix (Best) 7 22 29 11-79 33-237 44-316
Rogers Anyplace TV 13 40 54 27-32 80-95 106-127
CBC television 6.7-18 20-54 27-72 33-201 99-600 132-800
Global TV 45 134 178 32 95 127
YouTube (HD or 720p) 33 98 130 34-119 102-358 136-477
YouTube (480p) 88 265 353 - - -
YouTube (240p) 136 408 544 - - -
Audio streaming
Slacker Radio 304 912 1216 165-350 493-1049 650-1399
Live audio
Local (Ottawa) FM radio 1262 3786 5048 1200 3600 4750
CBC radio 330 990 1320 294-435 882-1306 1176-1741

Source: CRTC staff analysis

Due to the limited number of measurement samples and the wide variety of home network configurations and equipment, the reported average bandwidth and capacity used is for illustrative purposes only and results obtained may vary in different settings.

Broadband availability - Statistical information

a) Key broadband indicators

Table 6.1.3 Key telecommunications availability indicators

Platform
Availability (% of households)
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Mobile broadband
3G/3G equivalent 91 96 98 99 99
HSPA+ n/a n/a 97 99 99
LTE n/a n/a n/a 45 72
Wireline broadband
DSL 84 85 85 86# 87
Cable modem 80 80 81# 82# 82
Fixed wireless 80 81 82 86 501
IPTV 10 21 22 34 54
Digital satellite National National National National National

1. Decline is due to the deactivation of the Inukshuk network.
Source: CRTC data collection

Figure 6.1.2 Broadband availability (percentage of households)

This column chart describes, for 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 the availability of broadband via various access means.  For 2009, DSL was at 85%, Cable modem was at 80%, Fixed-wireless and Satellite was at 82%, for a total availability of 96%.  For 2010, DSL was at 85%, Cable modem was at 82%, Fixed-wireless and Satellite was at 83%, Mobile was at 96%, for a total availability of 98%.  For 2011, DSL was at 86%, Cable modem was at 82%, Fixed-wireless and Satellite was at 87%, Mobile was at 99%, for a total availability of 99%. For 2012, DSL was at 87%, Cable modem was at 82%, Fixed-wireless and Satellite was at 51%, Mobile was at 99%, for a total availability of 99%.

1. In 2012, the decline in fixed wireless & satellite availability was due to the deactivation of the Inukshuk network.

Sources: Industry Canada and CRTC data collection

Figure 6.1.3 Broadband availability v. broadband subscriptions, 2012

This stacked column chart describes, for the provinces of Canada, the availability of broadband via fixed technology, with a stacked element for the additional coverage provided by HSPA+ mobile technology.  In addition, it shows the subscriber take-up percentage of broadband subscriptions per province via fixed technology.  BC: 96%, HSPA+ adds 3%, take-up rate is 78%; AB: 99%, HSPA+ adds 1%, take-up rate is 76%; SK: over 99%, HSPA+ adds 0%, take-up rate is 74%; MB: 98%, HSPA+ adds 1%, take-up rate 70%; ON: 98%, HSPA+ adds 2%, take-up rate is 77%; QC: 96%, HSPA+ adds 4%, take-up rate is 74%; NB: over 99%, HSPA+ adds 0%, take-up rate is 73%; NS: over 99%, HSPA+ adds 0%, take-up rate is 70%; PEI: 99%, HSPA+ adds 1%, take-up rate is 76%; NL: 81%, HSPA+ adds 15%, take-up rate is 75%; North: 96%, HSPA+ adds 1%, take-up rate is 72%; Canada: 97%, HSPA+ adds 2%, take-up rate is 75%.

  • The provinces of New Brunswick and Saskatchewan have arrangements to provide broadband service via satellite at terms and conditions similar to wireline service, and these arrangements are taken into account in the fixed broadband availability bars in this chart.
  • HSPA+ in PEI is available to those without access to other means of broadband connectivity at terms and conditions equivalent to wireline service.
  • Excludes satellite.

Sources: Industry Canada and CRTC data collection

Figure 6.1.4 Broadband, 5 Mbps availability (percentage of households), 2012

This column chart describes, for 2012, the availability of 5 Mbps broadband via various access means. For 2012, DSL was at 83%, Cable modem was at 80%, Fixed-wireless and Satellite was at 22%, Mobile was at 72%, for a total availability of 94%.

Sources: Industry Canada and CRTC data collection

b) Broadband availability by speed

Figure 6.1.5 Broadband availability by speed (percentage of households)

This column chart describes the availability of broadband by various download speeds, in Mbps for 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012, excluding HSPA+.  For 1.5 to 4.9 Mbps: 95%, 96%, 97%, 97%; for 5 to 9.9 Mbps: 82%, 86%, 87%, 91%; for 10 to 15.9 Mbps: 77%, 81%, 83%, 84%; for 16 to 24.9 Mbps: 67%, 77%, 80%, 82%; From 25 to 29.9 Mbps: 45%, 70%, 78%, 80%; for 30 Mbps to 49.9 Mbps: 30%, 66%, 76%, 79%; 50 Mbps to 99.9 Mbps: 30%, 58%, 75%, 77%; and 100 Mbps and higher: 11%, 16%, 28%, 35%.

  • Excludes HSPA+, LTE and satellite.

Sources: Industry Canada and CRTC data collection

Table 6.1.4 Broadband availability platforms, by speed and number of platforms, 2012 (percentage of households)
Number of platforms 1.5 to 4.9 Mbps 5.0 to 9.9 Mbps 10.0 to 15.9 Mbps 16.0 to 24.9 Mbps 25.0 to 29.9 Mbps 30.0 to 49.9 Mbps 50.0 to 99.9 Mbps 100 Mbps and higher
1 3 9 25 28 32 33 76 32
2 11 15 59 54 48 45 0 0
3 50 58 0 0 0 0 0 0
4 36 10 0 0 0 0 0 0
  • Platforms include DSL, cable modem, fixed wireless, and mobile (HSPA+ and LTE)

Sources: Industry Canada and CRTC data collection

c) Availability by province

Table 6.1.5 Broadband availability, by speed and province/territory, 2012 (percentage of households)
Province 1.5 – 4.9 Mbps 5 – 9.9 Mbps 10 – 15.9 Mbps 16 – 24.9 Mbps 25 – 100 Mbps
British Columbia 99 94 90 89 87
Alberta 99 96 85 84 80
Saskatchewan 99 75 63 57 57
Manitoba 99 85 67 66 66
Ontario 99 95 87 85 84
Quebec 99 93 84 82 80
New Brunswick 99 89 82 82 82
Nova Scotia 99 82 78 75 72
Prince Edward Island 99 71 55 48 48
Newfoundland and Labrador 96 79 69 69 61
Yukon 99 90 61 61 60
Northwest Territories 91 85 50 50 42
Nunavut 99 29 0 0 0
  • HSPA+ is included only in the 1.5 to 4.9 Mbps speed tier, and LTE is included in the 5 to 9.9 category.
  • Data regarding availability of broadband speeds greater than 25 Mbps have been combined due to the confidentiality of the data.
  • Excludes satellite.

Sources: Industry Canada and CRTC data collection

Table 6.1.6 Number of households that can have broadband access (thousands)
Province 2010 2011 2012
British Columbia 1,739 1,766 1,781
Alberta 1,386 1,417 1,471
Saskatchewan 397 403 431
Manitoba 429 451 480
Ontario 4,928 5,014 5,055
Quebec 3,198 3,288 3,320
New Brunswick 315 316 316
Nova Scotia 399 401 401
Prince Edward Island 57 59 58
Newfoundland and Labrador 170 171 170
The North1 31 31 38
Canada 13,048 13,316 13,526
  • Excludes HSPA+, LTE and satellite.

1. The North includes Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut.   

Sources: Industry Canada and CRTC data collection

d) Urban v. rural

Figure 6.1.6 Broadband availability – Urban v. rural, 2012 (percentage of households)

This column chart shows broadband availability, by size of community and speed. Large population centers: 1.5-4.9 Mbps: 100%, 5-9.9 Mbps: 100%, 10-15.9 Mbps: 99%, 16-24.9 Mbps: 99%, 25-29.9 Mbps: 99%, 30-49.9 Mbps: 98%, 50-99.9 Mbps: 96%, 100+ Mbps: 42%. Medium population centers: 1.5-4.9 Mbps: 100%, 5-9.9 Mbps: 100%, 10-15.9 Mbps: 98%, 16-24.9 Mbps: 96%, 25-29.9 Mbps: 95%, 30-49.9 Mbps: 94%, 50-99.9 Mbps: 93%, 100+ Mbps: 43%. Small population centers: 1.5-4.9 Mbps: 100%, 5-9.9 Mbps: 98%, 10-15.9 Mbps: 90%, 16-24.9 Mbps: 85%, 25-29.9 Mbps: 77%, 30-49.9 Mbps: 72%, 50-99.9 Mbps: 68%, 100+ Mbps: 36%. Rural areas: 1.5-4.9 Mbps: 85%, 5-9.9 Mbps: 61%, 10-15.9 Mbps: 32%, 16-24.9 Mbps: 28%, 25-29.9 Mbps: 25%, 30-49.9 Mbps: 24%, 50-99.9 Mbps: 23%, 100+ Mbps: 12%. HSPA+ addition to small centres for broadband, under 1%, addition to rural areas for broadband: 12%;  LTE addition to small and medium centres for 5-9.9 Mbps: under 1%, addition to rural areas for 5-9Mbps: 3%.

  • Excludes satellite.

Sources: Industry Canada and CRTC data collection

6.2 Adoption of digital technologies

Overview

The Canadian communications system helps its creators, citizens and consumers, including small businesses, participate fully in the democratic, economic, social and cultural life of the country, at the national, provincial, regional, and municipal levels. Digital technologies are integrated into the daily lives of Canadians with over 75% of them subscribing to a broadband Internet service. This allows them to more effectively interact and participate actively in their communities, engage with the world, and enrich their social and cultural lives.

This section provides some indications of how Canadians are participating in the digital environment. It presents data displaying how they are accessing audio and video content and using the technologies available. Financial data is also included to display the extent to which service providers are attracting advertising revenues to digital platforms.

Statistical information – Financial data

a) Financial performance

Figure 6.2.1 Canadian online advertising revenues

This stacked bar chart identifies Canada’s online advertising revenues (in millions of dollars) in 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011, across various advertising categories. 2005: 197 in Search, 230 in Display, 124 in Classifieds/Directories, 11 in Email, 0 in Video, 0 in Video gaming; 2006: 343, 314, 223, 20, 0, 0; 2007: 478, 432, 305, 17, 9, 0; 2008: 602, 490, 480, 18, 12, 0; 2009: 741, 578, 467, 13, 20, 3; 2010: 907, 688, 587, 11, 37, 2; 2011: 1081, 840, 576, 13, 73, 10.

  •  2012 figures not available at time of printing

Source: 2011-2012 Canadian Online Advertising Revenue Report, IAB Canada

Statistical information – Overview

b) Digital media services

Figure 6.2.2 Cycle of consumer adoption / Product life cycle

This chart illustrates the product life cycle of technologies from new to old. The shape of the graph is a bell curve. The X-axis is labeled as Technology Adoption Stage / Time. The Y-axis is labeled as Penetration. Two text boxes are shown in the graph, the first is “New technologies that are growing”, and is displayed in the upper left corner. The second text box is “Old technologies that have peaked, and are now declining, and is in the upper right corner. The stages are listed from left to right are: Innovation, at 0-3% with the label “Techies try it”; Emerging, at 4-15% with the label “Visionaries spot winners”; Expanding, at 16-66%, with the label “Pragmatists see the value”; Maturing, at 67-100% (peak of curve) with the label “Conservatives see the writing on the wall”; Decline shown from 100% to 0% on the other have of the curve, with three labels spaced evenly, “New alternatives take hold”, “Disruptions to content availability or service begin”, and “Discontinuation of new content and service”.

Source: MTM  2012

Table 6.2.1 Media technology adoption by consumers categorized by life cycle stage in Canada, 2012
Innovation Emerging Expanding Maturing Declining
  Watch TV online only 4% Watch BDU provided Video-on-Demand 18% Have WiFi network at home 68% Listen to podcast 13%
  Watch Internet TV on a tablet 6% Stream AM/FM radio 20% Watch Internet video 71% Subscribe to analog cable  11%
  Watch Internet TV on a smartphone 6% Watch entire 30 or 60 minute TV show online 23% Subscribe to Digital TV 72% TV Antenna (off air) 6%
  Tuned out from TV (no BDU or OTA) 8% Watch full length movie online 24% Possess a  mobile phone (any type) 80% Subscribe to dial-up Internet 3%
  Stream audio on a tablet 8% Possess a Tablet 26% Subscribe to broadband Internet 82%    
  Watch TV shows on BDU VOD 13% Watch Internet TV 33% Subscribe to residential Internet 85%    
  Watch webisode or program produced for web1 13% Possess a PVR 42%        
  Stream online personalized music service 13% Possess a HD receiver 42%        
  Subscribe to satellite radio 13% Possess a MP3 Player 49%        
  Stream audio on a smartphone 14% Possess a Smartphone 51%        
      Listen to streamed audio 56%        
      Possess a HD set 61%        

1.     Applicable only to wireline survey respondents

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents:  Canadians 18+)

Table 6.2.2 Percentage of Canadians using the Internet, by linguistic group
  2007 2007 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012
Anglo Franco Anglo Franco Anglo Franco Anglo Franco Anglo Franco
Overall  Usage 81 71 83 76 86 79 87 82 88 83
18-34 95 91 94 93 96 97 97 97 98 98
35-49 89 84 91 88 92 90 94 92 95 94
50+ 66 51 69 59 74 63 75 63 78 69
  •  Usage in past month

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents:  Canadians 18+)

Table 6.2.3 Average weekly hours spent online by Canadian Internet users
  1999 2002 2005 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Anglophones 5.6 9.3 11.7 13.4 13.8 14.6 17.3 18.2 20.1
Francophones 6.3 7.7 9.1 9.8 11.2 11.9 12.8 13.1 13.0

Figure 6.2.3 Popular Internet activities for Canadian Internet users

This clustered bar chart compares the percentage of Anglophone and Francophone Canadians who reported participating in the following online activities in 2012: Watch Netflix online: 17% (Anglophones), 4% (Francophones); Watch Youtube video: 61%, 55%; Watch Internet TV: 38%, 34%; Watch Internet video: 73%, 64%; Stream music on Youtube: 49%, 38%; Stream AM/FM radio: 22%, 14%; Listen to an AM/FM podcast: 6%, 2%; Listening to a podcast: 16%, 5%; Twitter user: 16%, 8%; Facebook user: 56%, 53%; Downloading content from iTunes: 56%, 13%; Online listening (streaming and podcasts): 61%, 47%;   Streaming audio (excl. podcasts): 59%, 46%; Social networking: 59%, 55%; Read online news: 60%, 52%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

Figure 6.2.4 Percentage of Canadians viewing TV and accessing the Internet concurrently

This pie chart shows the percentage of Canadians who reported viewing TV and accessing the Internet concurrently, broken down by qualitatively as follows: Almost always: 12%, Often: 14%, Sometimes: 17%, Rarely: 15%, Never: 29% and No Internet: 13%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

c) Video

Figure 6.2.5 TV and Internet video viewing by consumers

This clustered bar chart compares the penetration of the following TV and Internet video viewing options broken down by Francophones, Anglophones, and nationally for 2012: Watch Webisodes or programs produced for web: 15% (Anglophones), 9% (Francophones), 13% (nationally); Sports highlight or event: 21%, 14%, 19%; Online news or news program: 24%, 21%, 23%;  Full length movie online: 28%, 13%, 24%; Entire 30 or 60 minute TV show online: 24%, 21%, 23%; Internet TV: 38%, 34%, 37%; Watch any type of Youtube video: 61%, 55%, 60%; Any type of internet video: 73%, 64%, 71%; Pay TV: 31%, 26%, 29%; TV: 92%, 97%, 94%.

*  Applicable only to wireline survey respondents

  • Usage in past month

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians18+)

Figure 6.2.6 Type of devices used by Internet TV viewers

This clustered column chart compares the percentage of Canadians using the following devices to watch Internet TV in 2012, broken down by Francophones and Anglophones as follows: Computer: 84% (Anglophones). 91% (Francophones); Smartphone: 18%, 11%; Tablet: 16%, 12%; TV attached to Internet: 24%, 6%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadian Internet TV viewers 18+)

Figure 6.2.7 Average weekly hours spent watching Internet TV

This clustered column chart shows the growth in the average weekly hours spent watching Internet TV for typical weekly users and all Canadians 18+ from 2007 to 2012 as follows: 2007: 1.9 hours (typical weekly user), 0.2 hours (total population); 2008: 1.5, 0.3; 2009: 2, 0.5; 2010: 2.4, 0.5; 2011: 2.8, 0.7; 2012: 3.0, 1.3.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

Figure 6.2.8 Percentage of Canadians subscribing to Netflix

This column chart shows the growth in the percentage of Canadians subscribing to Netflix from the spring of 2011 (6%) to the fall of 2012 (17%).

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

Figure 6.2.9 Canadian Netflix Subscribers by region

This bar chart compares the percentage of Canadians who have subscribed to Netflix by region as follows: British Columbia 23%, Alberta 27%, Manitoba/Saskatchewan 24%, Ontario 18%, Quebec 6%, Atlantic 19%, Total 17%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

Table 6.2.4 Adoption and growth rate of various video technologies in Canada (Percentage)
  Adoption Growth
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
PVR
Anglophones 13 18 23 35 43 30 38 28 52 23
Francophones 10 13 16 23 39 67 30 23 44 70
Internet TV1
Anglophones 22 30 31 34 38 - 36 3 10 12
Francophones 17 22 26 33 34 - 29 18 27 3
Internet video on cellphone1,2
Anglophones 5 5 9 12 142 150 0 80 33 17
Francophones 2 2 4 8 82 100 0 100 100 0
Internet TV on cellphone1  
Anglophones 1 1 2 4 7 - 0 100 100 75
Francophones - - 1 3 4 - - - 200 33
Internet video on Tablet1,2
Anglophones - - - 6 122  - - - - 100
Francophones - - - 3 72  - - - - 133
Internet TV on tablet1
Anglophones - - - 3 6 - - - - 100
Francophones - - - 2 4 - - - - 100
Netflix
Anglophones - - - 10 21 - - - - 110
Francophones - - - 5 5 - - - - 0
  1. Usage in past month
  2. Applicable  only to wireline survey respondents
  • Question regarding video on cellphones changed in 2011 to watch online video
  • Question regarding TV on cellphones changed in 2011 to watch TV programs or clips

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

d) Audio

Figure 6.2.10 Audio technology (excluding conventional radio) usage by consumers

This clustered bar chart shows the penetration of the following audio platforms among Anglophone and Francophone Canadians in 2012: Listen to a podcast: 16% (Anglophones), 5% (Francophones); Stream Audio on a Smartphone: 16%,8%; Stream Audio (excluding podcasts): 59%, 46%; Satellite Radio: 16%, 7%; MP3 Player: 52%, 39%.

* Usage in past month
** Applicable only to wireline survey respondents
Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians18+)

Figure 6.2.11 Podcast usage in Canada, by language group

This clustered column chart provides the percentage of Canadians, categorized by Anglophones and Francophones, surveyed in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012, who reported listening to a podcast in the previous month: 2007: 13% (Anglophones), 5% (Francophones); 2008: 19%, 7%; 2009: 19%, 5%; 2010: 17%, 7%; 2011: 13%, 5%; 2012: 16%, 5%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

Figure 6.2.12 Podcast users who listen to AM/FM podcasts, by language group

This bar chart show that in 2012, 45% of Francophones, 39% of Anglophones and 40% of Canadians   listened to AM/FM podcasts.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadian listeners of podcasts in past month 18+)

Figure 6.2.13 Percentage of Canadians streaming AM/FM radio, by language group

This clustered column chart provides the percentage of Canadians, categorized by Anglophones and Francophones, surveyed in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012, who reported streaming AM/FM radio in the previous month,: 2008: 16% (Anglophones), 13% (Francophones); 2009: 19%, 15%; 2010: 20%, 15%; 2011: 22%, 17%; 2012: 22%, 14%.

  • Past month users

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

Figure 6.2.14 Popular online streamed audio services accessed by consumers, by language group

This clustered bar chart compares the percentage of Anglophones and Francophones as well as the percentage of all Canadians 18+ who reported using following streamed audio services in the past month in 2012: Streamed music videos on Youtube: 82% (Anglophones), 81% (Francophones), 82% (Nationally); Streamed satellite radio online service: 4%, 3%, 4%; Streamed personalized online music service: 17%, 13%, 16%; Streamed AM/FM Radio: 37%, 31%, 35%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadian users of streamed audio services in past month 18+)

Figure 6.2.15 Satellite radio subscriptions, by language group

This clustered column chart shows the percentage of Anglophones and Francophones subscribing to satellite radio from 2007 to 2012 as follows: 2007: 8% (Anglophones), 3% (Francophones); 2008: 9%, 4%; 2009: 11%, 4%; 2010: 13%, 6%; 2011: 15%, 7%; 2012: 16%, 7%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

Table 6.2.5 Adoption and growth rates of various audio technologies in Canada (Percentage)
  Adoption Growth
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
MP3 player ownership
Anglophones 39 44 43 49 52 15 13 -2 14 6
Francophones 30 31 36 39 39 25 3 16 8 0
Podcast listening1
Anglophones 19 19 17 13 16 46 0 -11 -24 23
Francophones 7 5 7 5 5 40 -29 40 -29 0
Streaming AM/FM radio1
Anglophones 16 19 20 22 22 -11 19 5 10 10
Francophones 13 15 15 17 14 8 15 0 13 -18
Satellite radio subscriber
Anglophones 9 11 13 15 16 13 22 18 15 7
Francophones 4 4 6 7 7 33    0 50 17 0

1. Past month users

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

e) Mobile

Figure 6.2.16 Mobile device penetration

This clustered bar chart shows the percentage of Anglophones and Francophones owning the following mobile devices from 2007 to 2012: 2007: (Cellphones) 65%, Smartphones (6%), Tablets (0%); 2008: 67%, 9%, 0%; 2009: 69%, 14%, 0%; 2010: 72%, 24%, 3%; 2011: 77%, 37%, 10%; 2012: 80%, 51%, 26%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

Table 6.2.6 Mobile device penetration by linguistic group (Percentage)
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Anglo Franco Anglo Franco Anglo Franco Anglo Franco Anglo Franco
Cellphone1  70 56 72 59 74 63 80 67 83 71
Smartphone 10 6 16 8 27 14 41 26 55 39
Tablet         4 2 11 6 28 17
  1. Includes smartphones and regular cell phones

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

Figure 6.2.17 Mobile device penetration by region

This clustered bar chart shows the percentage of Canadians owning the following mobile devices in 2012 broken down by region: Regular cellphones: 27% (British Columbia), 25% (Alberta), 34% (Manitoba/Saskatchewan), 27% (Ontario), 30% (Quebec), 42% (Atlantic), 29% (Total); Smartphones: 55%, 66%, 51%, 54%, 41%, 42%, 51%; Tablets: 27%, 33%, 31%, 27%, 19%, 21%, 26%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadians 18+)

Figure 6.2.18 Popular Internet and mobile activities for Canadian smartphone owners, by language group

This clustered bar chart shows the percentage of Anglophone and Francophone Canadians who reported engaging in the following activities on their smartphone in 2012: Stream audio in car (Anglophones) 9%, (Francophones) 6%; Read online news: 37%, 35%; Listen to streamed audio: 29%, 22%; Watch Internet TV: 13%, 10%; Access social networking: 56%, 47%; Access Internet: 81%, 73%; Send/receive Email: 70%, 58%; Text message: 93%, 87%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadian smartphone owners 18+)

Figure 6.2.19 Popular Internet and mobile activities for Canadian tablet owners

This clustered bar chart shows the percentage of Anglophone and Francophone Canadians who reported engaging in the following activities on their tablet in 2012: Read online news: (Anglophones) 51%, (Francophones) 55%; Listen to streamed audio: 32%, 28%; Watch Internet TV: 22%, 25%; Access social networking: 49%, 49%; Access Internet: 86%, 86%; Send/receive Email: 67%, 68%.

Source: MTM 2012 (Respondents: Canadian tablet owners 18+)