Report on Plans and Priorities 2014-2015

Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission

The Honourable Shelly Glover, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

 

Download this report in PDF.


Table of Contents


2014-15 Estimates

PART III – Departmental Expenditure Plans: Reports on Plans and Priorities

Purpose

Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP) are individual expenditure plans for each department and agency. These reports provide increased levels of detail over a three-year period on an organization's main priorities by strategic outcome, program and planned/expected results, including links to related resource requirements presented in the Main Estimates. In conjunction with the Main Estimates, Reports on Plans and Priorities serve to inform members of Parliament on planned expenditures of departments and agencies, and support Parliament's consideration of supply bills. The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates by the President of the Treasury Board.

Estimates Documents

The Estimates are comprised of three parts:

Part I - Government Expenditure Plan - provides an overview of the Government's requirements and changes in estimated expenditures from previous fiscal years.

Part II - Main Estimates - supports the appropriation acts with detailed information on the estimated spending and authorities being sought by each federal organization requesting appropriations.

In accordance with Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Parts I and II must be tabled on or before March 1.

Part III - Departmental Expenditure Plans - consists of two components:

DPRs are individual department and agency accounts of results achieved against planned performance expectations as set out in respective RPPs.

The DPRs for the most recently completed fiscal year are tabled in the fall by the President of the Treasury Board.

Supplementary Estimates support Appropriation Acts presented later in the fiscal year. Supplementary Estimates present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or have subsequently been refined to account for developments in particular programs and services. Supplementary Estimates also provide information on changes to expenditure forecasts of major statutory items as well as on such items as: transfers of funds between votes; debt deletion; loan guarantees; and new or increased grants.

For more information on the Estimates, please consult the Treasury Board Secretariat website.

Links to the Estimates

As shown above, RPPs make up part of the Part III of the Estimates documents. Whereas Part II emphasizes the financial aspect of the Estimates, Part III focuses on financial and non-financial performance information, both from a planning and priorities standpoint (RPP), and an achievements and results perspective (DPR).

The Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) establishes a structure for display of financial information in the Estimates and reporting to Parliament via RPPs and DPRs. When displaying planned spending, RPPs rely on the Estimates as a basic source of financial information.

Main Estimates expenditure figures are based on the Annual Reference Level Update which is prepared in the fall. In comparison, planned spending found in RPPs includes the Estimates as well as any other amounts that have been approved through a Treasury Board submission up to February 1st (See Definitions section). This readjusting of the financial figures allows for a more up-to-date portrait of planned spending by program.

Changes to the presentation of the Report on Plans and Priorities

Several changes have been made to the presentation of the RPP partially to respond to a number of requests – from the House of Commons Standing Committees on Public Accounts (PAC - Report 15), in 2010; and on Government and Operations Estimates (OGGO - Report 7), in 2012 – to provide more detailed financial and non-financial performance information about programs within RPPs and DPRs, thus improving the ease of their study to support appropriations approval.

How to read this document

RPPs are divided into four sections:

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

This Organizational Expenditure Overview allows the reader to get a general glance at the organization. It provides a description of the organization’s purpose, as well as basic financial and human resources information. This section opens with the new Organizational Profile, which displays general information about the department, including the names of the minister and the deputy head, the ministerial portfolio, the year the department was established, and the main legislative authorities. This subsection is followed by a new subsection entitled Organizational Context, which includes the Raison d’être, the Responsibilities, the Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture, the Organizational Priorities and the Risk Analysis. This section ends with the Planned Expenditures, the Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes, the Estimates by Votes and the Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. It should be noted that this section does not display any non-financial performance information related to programs (please see Section II).

Section II: Analysis of Program(s) by Strategic Outcome(s)

This Section provides detailed financial and non-financial performance information for strategic outcomes, Programs and sub-programs. This section allows the reader to learn more about programs by reading their respective description and narrative entitled “Planning Highlights”. This narrative speaks to key services or initiatives which support the plans and priorities presented in Section I; it also describes how performance information supports the department’s strategic outcome or parent program.

Section III: Supplementary Information

This section provides supporting information related to departmental plans and priorities. In  this section, the reader will find future-oriented statement of operations and a link to supplementary information tables regarding transfer payments, as well as information related to the greening government operations, internal audits and evaluations, horizontal initiatives, user fees, major crown and transformational projects, and up-front multi-year funding, where applicable to individual organizations. The reader will also find a link to the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations, produced annually by the Minister of Finance, which provides estimates and projections of the revenue impacts of federal tax measures designed to support the economic and social priorities of the Government of Canada.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

In this last section, the reader will have access to organizational contact information.

Definitions


Minister's Message

The Honourable Shelly Glover, P.C., M.P

As we approach Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017, we have the opportunity to reflect on the richness of our heritage and on the vitality of our communities. The Department of Canadian Heritage and its Portfolio organizations contribute to the vitality of our society by encouraging creativity in Canada’s heritage, arts and cultural communities. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), as a Portfolio organization, is proud to play a part in achieving the Government’s objectives in these areas.

One of the CRTC’s goals is to ensure that Canadians have access to a healthy, competitive communications industry that offers quality services. Over the last year, the CRTC has consulted citizens and consumers across the country to better understand their broadcasting and telecommunications needs. These consultations—on issues such as a code of conduct for wireless service providers and the renewal of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation/Radio Canada’s broadcasting licences— hinged on new approaches to public engagement. The CRTC’s ongoing study of the future of television is one example of this.

In 2014–15, the CRTC will examine wholesale telecommunications services and the wholesale market for mobile wireless services. Following this examination, the CRTC will make decisions that reflect the input of Canadians and the complexities of the industry it is responsible for overseeing.

As Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages, I am pleased to present to Canadians Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s Report on Plans and Priorities 2014–15. I invite anyone wishing to learn about CRTC’s responsibilities, priorities and activities to read this report.

 

The Honourable Shelly Glover, P.C., M.P.


Chairman and Chief Executive Officer’s Message

Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

I am pleased to present the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC’s) Report on Plans and Priorities for 2014-15. This report describes the principal activities that the CRTC will carry out over the coming year—within the legislative mandate defined by Parliament—to ensure that Canadians as citizens, creators and consumers continue to have access to a world-class communication system.

As an administrative tribunal, the CRTC regularly seeks Canadians’ views on the state of their communication system. During 2014-15, Canadians will have more opportunities to participate in our activities through various traditional and innovative methods.

The activities we plan to undertake in 2014-15 are presented under the pillars of create, connect and, for the first time in this report, protect.

With respect to the create pillar, the CRTC ensures that Canadians have access to compelling and creative content on a variety of platforms. In the year ahead, we will work to modernize the regulatory framework for the Canadian broadcasting system. In particular, we will pursue our conversation with Canadians on the future of television by launching a formal public proceeding, which will include a public hearing in September 2014.

The activities under the connect pillar ensure that Canadians have access to quality and innovative communication services at affordable prices. Recognizing that Canadians are increasingly relying on their mobile devices, we will examine whether the current arrangements between large and small wireless companies are affecting the sustainability of competition in the market.

Finally, the CRTC ensures that Canada’s communication system enhances the safety and interests of Canadians. Through the protect pillar, we will continue to promote compliance with the telemarketing rules and take enforcement action where necessary. At the same time, we will finalize our preparations for the coming into force of Canada’s anti-spam legislation, and the launch of the Spam Reporting Centre, on July 1, 2014.

Underlying each of these pillars is a commitment to management excellence and to building a high-performing organization. In 2014-15, we will continue to transform the CRTC’s website into a more accessible, intuitive and user-friendly destination for the public and the communication industry.

The CRTC strives to be a trusted institution that keeps pace with Canadians’ evolving communications needs and interests. Our continued success depends in large part on our ability and willingness to listen to Canadians and on using this input to make decisions that benefit citizens, creators and consumers across the country.

 

Jean-Pierre Blais
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer


Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Shelly Glover, P.C., M.P. Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Deputy head: Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Ministerial portfolio: Canadian Heritage

Year established: 1968

Main legislative authorities:

Organizational Context

Raison d’être and Responsibilities

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an administrative tribunal that regulates and supervises Canadian broadcasting and telecommunications in the public interest, as well as contributes to protecting Canadians from unsolicited communications.

The CRTC’s responsibilities include the following:

In addition, the CRTC annually updates a Three-Year Plan that details forecasted activities with respect to its three pillars: Create, Connect, and Protect, as well as Management Excellence.

The CRTC undertakes its responsibilities with a focus on Canadian citizens, creators and consumers, and strives to be a trusted institution. Canada’s communication system continues to evolve in a complex and dynamic manner, and is of growing importance to the lives of Canadians.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

1. Strategic Outcome: Canadians have access to a world-class communications system

1.1 Program: Canadian Content Creation

1.1.1 Sub-Program: Diverse Canadian Content

1.1.2 Sub-Program: Compelling Canadian Content

1.2 Program: Connection to the Communication System

1.2.1 Sub-Program: Quality Communication Services

1.2.2 Sub-Program: Affordable Communication Services

1.3 Program: Protection Within the Communication System

1.3.1 Sub-Program: Safety-Enhancing Communication Services

1.3.2 Sub-Program: Unsolicited Commercial Communications

Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority Type1 Program
Modernizing the regulatory framework for the Canadian broadcasting system New Canadian Content Creation
Description

Why is this a priority?

The CRTC has a legislative mandate to regulate and supervise the broadcasting system in Canada. Television and radio programming provided by the broadcasting system is important to Canadians, as a source of news and information, to entertain and enlighten them, as well as to provide them with a shared cultural and social experience. In the age of digital technologies, marked by an abundance of scheduled and on-demand programming choices available on many platforms (e.g. cable, satellite, the Internet and mobile devices), the system should provide programming that is diverse and compelling. The CRTC’s regulatory approach to broadcasting requires review to ensure that it keeps pace with the  advances in the industry and the changing needs of Canadians as consumers, creators and citizens for years to come.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

To support modernizing the regulatory framework for the Canadian broadcasting system, the CRTC will

  • develop, review and update broadcasting regulatory policies by means of public processes, taking into account the broad range of interests and needs of Canada’s diverse population, including those living with disabilities and those living in official language minority communities;
  • continue to set conditions and issue licences for broadcasting distribution undertakings to operate in Canada; and
  • continue to monitor and report on the broadcasting sector to assess the ongoing effectiveness of broadcasting regulatory policies.

1 Type is defined as follows: previously committed to—committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing—committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new—newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR. If another type that is specific to the department is introduced, an explanation of its meaning must be provided.

 

Priority Type Program
Improving access to advanced and competitive communications services New Connection to the Communication System
Description

Why is this a priority?

The communication system in Canada enables Canadians to participate in the democratic, economic, social and cultural life of their country, region, province and community. For Canadian businesses, the communication system is key to serving their clients and helping their employees work more productively. Healthy competition among multiple service providers across the country is required for Canadians, including those in rural and remote areas as well as those living with disabilities, to have access to a world-class communication system. Guided by its legislative mandate, the CRTC regulates where market forces are not sufficient to produce, promote and sustain a competitive telecommunications market. Such regulatory measures include requiring large incumbent telephone and cable companies to provide essential wholesale telecommunications services to their competitors in a manner that encourages ongoing investment and innovation, as well as more choice for the Canadian consumer.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

To support improving access to advanced and competitive communication services, the CRTC will

  • develop, review and update regulatory policies by means of public processes, taking into account a broad range of interests and needs, including those of Canadians in rural and remote areas, and those living with disabilities;
  • respond to requests from entities to resolve competitive disputes, approve tariffs and review decisions; and
  • monitor and report on the communications sector to assess the ongoing effectiveness of associated regulatory policies.

 

Priority Type1 Program
Strengthening the security and safety of Canadians within the communications system New Protection Within the Communication System
Description

Why is this a priority?

Canadians are increasingly reliant on digital technologies and the communication system. Greater use of digital technologies is enhancing the lives of Canadians; however, it is also making them vulnerable to unsolicited commercial communications, including unwanted telemarketing calls and other threats to electronic commerce. Guided by its legislative mandate, the CRTC promotes and enforces compliance with legislation, regulation and rules, which serve to help protect Canadians from abuse of communication services. In addition, the CRTC sets out conditions for telecommunications service providers to improve Canadians’ access to services essential to their health and safety, such as 9-1-1 and emergency public alerting.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

To strengthen the security and safety of Canadians within the communication system, the CRTC will

  • respond to complaints from Canadians about concerns including those related to Canada’s anti-spam legislation and non-compliance with the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules;
  • monitor compliance, conduct investigations and take enforcement actions, including administering monetary penalties for non-compliance;
  • adopt measures to strengthen innovation, investment and participation in regimes to enhance public safety and consumer protection;
  • collaborate with international enforcement agencies on enforcement actions and emerging issues, including the challenges associated with caller identification spoofing;
  • monitor and report on strengthening the safety and security of Canadians; and
  • provide information to help consumers understand and navigate the communication marketplace, and enable them to protect their own interests.

 

Priority Type1 Program
Building a high-performing organization New Internal Services
Description

Why is this a priority?

A high-performing organization enables the CRTC to achieve its objective of excellence in management. In line with the Government of Canada’s focus on cost efficiencies, the CRTC will focus its resources on achieving better results for Canadians and delivering more efficient and effective services and business processes.

The CRTC is implementing more consistent and comprehensive approaches to performance and productivity, to fostering high levels of engagement, and to creating opportunities for learning that will help develop employees to achieve their potential.

Given the importance of the CRTC’s workforce when delivering on the CRTC’s priorities, building a healthy and enriching work environment and maintaining a skilled and productive workforce will be key to the CRTC’s success in the coming years.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

To build a high-performing organization, the CRTC will

  • strengthen integrated financial, human resources, performance measurement, stewardship, accountability and business planning practices;
  • continue to modernize information management practices;
  • improve performance management and employee engagement;
  • improve succession planning and knowledge transfer;
  • continue to align with the Government of Canada’s priorities and initiatives;
  • continue to provide staff and Commissioners with the right tools to support their effectiveness and to engage Canadians; and
  • continue to improve Web-based services for Canadians.

Risk Analysis

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Fragmented distribution of broadcasting content and communication services

Given that constant technological evolution allows for rapid development of new global communication services, there is a risk that the CRTC’s capacity to fulfill its legislated objectives will be impacted.
  • The CRTC will continue to monitor and strategically analyze market conditions and technological developments in order to advance regulatory policies.
  • The CRTC will engage in continuous dialogue with consumers, creators, and service providers to identify and analyze trends.
  • The CRTC collaborates with external stakeholders on the promotion of Canadian programming.
All programs
Increased reliance on communication services

Given that Canadians’ reliance on communications services is rapidly increasing, there is a risk that the CRTC’s policies and regulations will not be developed quickly enough to address emerging issues.
  • The CRTC will conduct ongoing research and analysis to identify gaps, challenges, trends, and issues to ensure that policies and regulations can be developed to respond to issues in a timely manner.
  • The CRTC will develop consultative strategies for key external stakeholders to monitor and discuss evolving trends impacting policies and regulations.
All programs
Human resources

Given the rapidly changing CRTC workforce, including new employees and employees eligible for retirement, there is a risk that the CRTC will not have a well-chosen, well-trained, and well-led workforce to successfully contribute to the achievement of CRTC objectives.
  • The CRTC continues to conduct strategic human resourcing planning, including talent management, training and learning, and succession planning.
  • The CRTC continuously reviews and monitors the efficacy of its human resource plans.
All programs

Fragmented distribution of broadcasting content and communication services
In an environment of fragmentation, the CRTC continues to consider new approaches to meet its legislated policy objectives. The production of Canadian content in a world of vastly expanding choice may pose a challenge for the CRTC in terms of achieving the policy objectives of the Broadcasting Act. Evolving telecommunications platforms also pose challenges with regard to ensuring access to advanced networks and fulfilling the policy objectives of the Telecommunications Act. Through research and consultations, the CRTC continues to assess the effectiveness of its regulatory policies.

Increased reliance on communication services

Technology continues to evolve at a rapid pace, and Canadians’ reliance on communications services continues to increase. It is imperative that the CRTC’s policies and regulations are developed in a timely manner to meet the needs of Canadians. As a result, the CRTC continues to strategically consult with key stakeholders, as well as with the public at large, to ensure that its policies and regulations will respond to key issues.

Human resources

Given the rapidly changing CRTC workforce, there has been increased pressure on managers to deliver on the CRTC’s responsibilities while also leading employees through renewal and implementing the CRTC’s human resources action plans. These action plans include talent management initiatives, the training and learning program, and succession planning.

Taking a forward-looking approach, the CRTC will continue to offer structured job rotations and organized, cost-effective and targeted training and learning activities to increase and develop required skills.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending—dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
58,030,688 58,030,688 58,028,535 58,028,535

Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents—FTE)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
437 437 437

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome(s) and Program(s) (dollars)
Strategic Outcome(s), Program(s) and Internal Services 2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Expenditures
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have access to a wide variety of high quality, Canadian produced programming and to reliable, affordable and high-quality telecommunications services
Canadian Broadcasting 21,357,039 19,821,180
Canadian Telecommunications 21,913,909 21,286,180
Internal Services 15,366,838 15,349,760
Total 58,637,786 56,457,120

For fiscal year 2013-14, the CRTC changed its Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture. Further changes were made for FY 2014-15 such that the CRTC has gone from 3 programs to 4 (including Internal Services).

Strategic Outcome(s), Program(s) and Internal Services 2013-14 Forecast Spending 2014-15 Main Estimates 2014-15 Planned Spending 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have access to a world-class communication system
Canadian Content Creation 18,734,712 16,179,911 16,179,911 16,179,297 16,179,297
Connection to the Communication System 23,333,698 18,746,077 18,746,077 18,745,357 18,745,357
Protection Within the Communication System - 9,594,595 9,594,595 9,594,257 9,594,257
Internal Services 15,705,823 13,510,105 13,510,105 13,509,624 13,509,624
Total 57,774,233 58,030,688 58,030,688 58,028,535 58,028,535

Starting fiscal year 2014-15 the CRTC has created a new program called ‘Protection within the Communication System’.  Funding for this program comes from a reallocation of resources from the ‘Canadian Content Creation’, ‘Connection to the Communication System’ and ‘Internal services’ programs. Further information and explanations on year-over-year expenditures, spending trends and variances are presented in the section entitled Departmental Spending Trend.

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes

2014-15 Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Area (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2014-15
Planned Spending
Canadians have access to a
world-class communications system
1.1 Canadian Content Creation Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 16,179,911
1.2 Connection to the Communication System Economic Affairs A fair and secure marketplace 18,746,077
1.3 Protection Within the Communication System Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 9,594,595

 

Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs 18,746,077
Social Affairs 25,774,506
International Affairs 0
Government Affairs 0

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

For 2014-15 fiscal year, the CRTC plans to spend $58.0 million to meet the expected results of its program activities and contribute to its strategic outcome.

The figure below illustrates the CRTC’s spending trend from 2011-12 to 2016-17.

This graph illustrates the CRTC’s spending trends from 2011-12 to 2016-17. 
In 2011-12, the actual spending was $58.6M; in 2012-13, the actual spending was $56.5M. The forecasted spending for 2013-14 is $57.8M. The planned spending for 2014-15 to 2016-17 is $58M.

The reduction in actual spending from 2011-12 to 2012-13 was primarily due to two factors.   Firstly, an internal initiative was launched in 2012-13 to review the CRTC’s organizational structure and priorities with an objective of improving efficiencies and reducing operating costs. As a result of this review, several efficiency improvements were put in place that contributed to reduced spending levels. For example, overall expenditures on travel, hospitality and conferences decreased by $.5 million or 36% compared to the previous year's expenditures. Secondly, expenditures were higher in 2011-12 due to the one-time payment of severance benefits that were made as a result of changes to various collective agreements.

Starting in 2013-14, CRTC will achieve Budget 2012 savings of $0.4 million, and on-going, through program reductions for its statutory investigation and enforcement activities under Canada’s anti-spam legislation. The forecasted increase in overall expenditures for this fiscal year is attributed primarily to compensation adjustments for collective agreements that were ratified and paid during this period.

Spending for the period from 2014-15 to 2016-17 corresponds to the planned spending level approved in the Main Estimates.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the CRTC’s organizational appropriations, please see the 2014-15 Main Estimates publication.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

The CRTC also ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA). An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.


Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Canadians have the access to a world-class communications system

Program 1.1: Canadian Content Creation

Description:

This program focuses on ensuring that a wealth of Canadian content is created and made available to all Canadians on a variety of platforms. Through its orders, decisions, licensing frameworks, and other regulatory activities, the CRTC encourages the creation of diverse programming that reflects the attitudes, opinions, ideas, values and artistic creativity of Canadians. By requiring the display of Canadian content in entertainment programming and the provision of information and analysis concerning Canada, the CRTC is enabling Canadians to better participate in their country’s democratic and cultural life.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014−15
 Main Estimates
2014-15
 Planned Spending
2015-16
 Planned Spending
2016-17
 Planned Spending
16,179,911 16,179,911 16,179,297 16,179,297

 

Human Resources (FTE)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
122 122 122

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The broadcasting system provides Canadians with a wealth of Canadian programming. Total spending on Canadian television programming projects $2.6 Billion March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

Through a public proceeding the CRTC will build on its public engagement initiative, Let’s Talk TV: A conversation with Canadians, which sought the views of Canadians on the programming available to them, on the technologies used to receive this programming, on the future of television broadcasting, and on whether Canadians have enough information to make informed choices and seek redress should they have concerns. This will include a public hearing in September 2014. In 2014-15 the CRTC will publish a proposed framework for the future of television in Canada, designed to respond to the wants and needs of all Canadians, and continuing to promote the objectives of the Broadcasting Act. In addition to conducting a formal review of television programming, including a public hearing, the CRTC will use a number of tools to continue the conversation with Canadians to ensure that they are at the centre of the revitalized television system. Additional proceedings on specific matters may follow, when and if needed.  The CRTC will also review policies for the radio sector, and will continue to set terms and conditions for new and renewed broadcasting licences.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Diverse Canadian Content

Description:

As set out in the Broadcasting Act and through its broadcasting licensing processes and regulatory frameworks, the CRTC supports the creation of diverse Canadian programming that provides a balance of information and entertainment for all Canadians. The CRTC will ensure that Canadian programming is available in both official and minority languages. By providing access to a number of local, regional and national information sources, Canadians will be better informed and therefore more able to actively participate in our democratic society.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
 Planned Spending
2015-16
 Planned Spending
2016-17
 Planned Spending
8,028,629 8,028,327 8,028,327

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
59 59 59

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Diverse Canadian programming is created and broadcast Percentage of examined undertakings compliant with regulatory requirements regarding broadcast of Canadian programming 90% March 31, 2015
Percentage of examined undertakings compliant with regulatory requirements to spend and/or contribute to funds or initiatives supporting Canadian content creation 90% March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to set conditions to ensure that diversity of ownership and programming are maintained, and will continue to monitor and report on the broadcasting sector. As part of the television policy review, the CRTC will explore tools that will ensure that a broad variety of programming that reflects the diversity of all Canadians (linguistically, geographically, culturally and demographically) continues to be made available in the Canadian television system.

The CRTC will review, by means of a public consultation process, the 1999 Ethnic Broadcasting Policy as it pertains to radio programming. Through this review, the CRTC will seek to ensure that its approach to over-the-air ethnic radio services remains appropriate in light of Canada’s diverse population, and the availability of alternative radio programming services.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Compelling Canadian Content

Description:

Through the conditions it places on broadcasters and distribution undertakings, the CRTC will ensure that Canadians have access to high quality Canadian programming that is supported by strong production values. Canadian drama and comedy programs that reflect our values and attitudes will be compelling to Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
8,151,281 8,150,970 8,150,970

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
63 63 63

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Compelling Canadian programming is created Percentage of total television viewing is to Canadian programming 48% March 31, 2015
Average percentage of radio listening is to Canadian content 50% March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to monitor and report on the broadcasting sector, and set conditions to ensure that broadcasting distribution undertakings provide programming choices that are reflective of Canadians. In addition, the CRTC will continue to require that broadcasting distribution undertakings make an appropriate contribution to the creation and broadcast of compelling Canadian content. In this context, the CRTC will review, by means of a public process, the licences of the French-language stations owned by Quebecor Media Inc. and Remstar Diffusion. The CRTC will also undertake a public process to review the licences of Rogers’ over-the-air and specialty television services. As noted above, the CRTC’s television policy review will explore new tools that will ensure that the broadcasting system provides compelling Canadian television programming that Canadians choose to watch.

In 2013-14, by means of a public consultation process, the CRTC conducted a targeted review of its policy for commercial radio. An updated regulatory policy, to be published in 2014-15, will streamline this policy and make it more flexible and effective as it achieves the objectives of the Broadcasting Act.

Also in 2013-14, by means of a public consultation process, the CRTC reviewed its policy with respect to tangible benefits and value of the transaction. The associated decision, to be published in 2014-15, will streamline and provide additional guidance and clarity to applicants, to ensure that these transactions continue to yield measurable improvements to the communities served by broadcasting distribution undertakings and to the Canadian broadcasting system as a whole.

Program 1.2: Connection to the Communication System

Description:

The CRTC facilitates the orderly development of a communication system for all Canadians in order to strengthen the social and economic fabric of Canada and enhance the safety and interests of Canadians. This program focuses on ensuring that Canadians can connect to a choice of accessible, innovative and quality communication services at affordable prices, and thereby have access, amongst other things, to compelling and creative Canadian programming.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014−15 
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
18,746,077 18,746,077 18,745,357 18,745,357

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
132 132 132

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The communications system provides quality and affordable communication service options to Canadians Percentage of retail telecommunication revenues from competitive markets 94% March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

The CRTC will consult with Canadians and undertake public processes to develop policies that will contribute to improving access to and the affordability of communication services for Canadians, including those living with disabilities and those living in rural and remote locations, while taking into consideration the requirement for incentives for the communications industry to invest in innovative services.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Quality Communication Services

Description:

Through its regulatory frameworks, the CRTC contributes to ensure that Canadians have a choice of quality communication service providers for telephone, Internet access, wireless and broadcasting distribution services. The CRTC monitors the broadband speeds and network practices of Internet service providers to ensure that they meet the expectations of Canadians and are capable of providing Canadians with access to new and innovative services. The CRTC reviews and updates its regulatory decisions and provides alternative dispute resolution services to ensure impediments to a competitive marketplace for the delivery of communication services are addressed. As well, the CRTC continues to develop regulatory frameworks and coordinate the activities of industry groups to provide Canadians with disabilities access to communication services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
9,961,874 9,961,493 9,961,493

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
70 70 70

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Quality and accessible communication services Percentage of households that have access to broadband speeds of at least 5 megabits per second (Mbps) downstream and 1 Mbps upstream 100% December 31, 2014
Percentage of retail quality of service indicators met by local telephone companies 95% December 31, 2014
Percentage of examined undertakings in compliance with regulatory requirements regarding accessibility 100% March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

The CRTC will begin to consult with Canadians and review, through a public process, the definition of a basic service (as outlined in the Telecommunications Act) in today’s environment, to determine which telecommunications services are required by all Canadians regardless of their geographic location. This review will include an assessment of enhanced communication services, such as broadband Internet service, as well as of the changes that may be required to the subsidy regime and national contribution mechanisms that serve to encourage the provision of basic services in high-cost serving areas.

The CRTC will continue to take measures to ensure that companies in the industry provide persons with disabilities accessible communication devices and services. Following public consultations, the CRTC will study the accessibility of mobile wireless handsets. The CRTC will also release its decision regarding the provision of video relay services for Canadians with hearing or speech disabilities, and conduct follow-up activities as appropriate.   

The CRTC will collaborate with Internet service providers on a national broadband performance measurement initiative. The results of this initiative will enable the CRTC to understand the extent to which Canadians have access to specific broadband speed targets in 2015.

The CRTC will continue to monitor the progress of Northwestel’s revised modernization plan for 2014-17, and will ensure that it is implemented as planned.

The CRTC expects Northwestel to continue to invest in its network to provide better telecommunications services for Northern Canadians, including broadband Internet services and fourth-generation mobile wireless services.

To gain a better understanding of satellite transport services provided to companies that offer telecommunications services in Canada, an Inquiry Officer, appointed by the CRTC, will lead a study on satellite transport services in Canada.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Affordable Communication Services

Description:

The CRTC seeks to ensure that Canadians are able to connect to telephone, Internet access, wireless and broadcasting distribution services at rates that are affordable and provide value. The CRTC assesses tariffs provided by service providers, monitors developments in the communications industry, monitors consumer complaints and provides information to consumers to ensure that Canadians can make informed choices between service providers who offer innovative and affordable packages of services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
8,784,203 8,783,864 8,783,864

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
62 62 62

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Consumers have communication service choices Percentage of households that have access to three or more service providers for broadband Internet service 95% March 31, 2015
Percentage of households that have access to three or more broadcasting distribution undertakings 95% August 31, 2014

Planning Highlights

The provision of wholesale telecommunications services facilitates competition in retail markets and helps to provide Canadians with increased choice. The CRTC will consult with Canadians and undertake a public process to review its policy for wholesale telecommunications services, including wholesale service pricing and the appropriateness of mandating new wholesale services (including fibre-to-the-premises facilities).  As part of the review, the CRTC will seek to facilitate the development of a competitive Canadian telecommunications market in order to improve consumer choice, taking into consideration the incentives for service providers to invest in innovative networks.

The CRTC will also examine wholesale wireless roaming arrangements in Canada to determine whether wireless service providers are placing their Canadian competitors at an unfair competitive disadvantage. In addition, the CRTC will examine the state of the wireless wholesale services market and the sustainability of competition in the Canadian wireless market to help decide whether regulatory action is required.

The CRTC will assess the results of its fact-finding exercise regarding payphones in Canada to determine if its policy on payphones requires review.

Program 1.3: Protection within the Communication System

Description:

Through this program, the CRTC promotes compliance with and enforcement of its various laws and regulations, including unsolicited communications. It helps to ensure that Canadians have access to emergency communication services such as 9-1-1 service and alerting systems. As a result, Canadians have increased protection and benefit from a more secure communication system.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
9,594,595 9,594,257 9,594,257 9,594,257

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
69 69 69

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canadian communication services contribute to the protection and safety of Canadians Percentage of Canadians who consider that the CRTC is taking measures to enhance their safety and protection in the communication system 50% March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

The CRTC will undertake key initiatives that will contribute to the security, health and safety of Canadians in an evolving communication system, and to building their confidence in electronic commerce.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Safety-enhancing Communication Services

Description:

The CRTC contributes to strengthening a communication system that provides services that enhance the safety of Canadians. Examples of these services include 9-1-1 emergency response services and access, and public alerting systems. The CRTC monitors the development of, and broadcaster participation in, the public alert system. In order to ensure that the 9-1-1 system remains up to date, the CRTC continues to enhance the regulatory framework for next generation 911 systems.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2,282,528 2,282,442 2,282,442

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
16 16 16

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Communication service providers offer safety-enhancing services Percentage of broadcasters participating in public alerting system 80% March 31, 2015
Percentage of facilities-based telecommunication service providers in compliance with 911 requirements 100% March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

Emergency response services are vital to the safety and security of all Canadians. The CRTC will build on its study of 9-1-1 services in Canada, in collaboration with private and public sector partners who together provide 9-1-1 services. The CRTC will assess the performance and adequacy of the technology currently employed for 9-1-1 services, such as that used to locate a caller who is using a cell phone. The CRTC will continue to study issues related to the provision of 9-1-1 services on next-generation networks across Canada.

The CRTC will continue to monitor the 9-1-1 service and public alerting system industry, respond to complaints and take measures to strengthen compliance with rules governing the loudness of commercial messages, and address complaints related to Internet traffic management practices. The CRTC will review, by means of a public process, broadcaster participation in the National Public Alerting System.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Unsolicited commercial communications

Description:

The CRTC enhances the privacy and protection of Canadians, including Canadian consumers, by promoting compliance with and enforcement of its rules and regulations relating to unsolicited communications, including those related to the National Do Not Call List (DNCL) and Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL). In order to make Canadians more aware of the measures available to protect themselves from unsolicited communications, the CRTC designs public education and outreach activities for the DNCL and CASL. The CRTC also develops domestic and international partnerships in order to facilitate enforcement activities related to the DNCL and CASL. The CRTC investigates complaints and takes appropriate enforcement actions for both the DNCL and CASL.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
7,312,068 7,311,815 7,311,815

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
53 53 53

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Unsolicited commercial communications violations are reduced Percentage of unsolicited commercial messages (spam) reduced within 12 month period 10% March 31, 2015
Percentage of organizations that remain compliant within 12 months after compliance/enforcement action taken 80% March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As the primary government agency responsible for administering and enforcing Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL), the CRTC will undertake its legislated responsibilities regarding the sending of unsolicited commercial electronic messages, as of July 1, 2014.  When Section 8 of CASL comes into force on January 15, 2015, the CRTC will begin to enforce provisions relating to the unauthorized installation of computer programs.

The CRTC will operationalize the Spam Reporting Centre, which is designed to provide data sets, complaints and reports to support the three federal government agencies mandated to enforce CASL. The CRTC will identify instances of non-compliance, prioritize its investigative activities and take appropriate legislated enforcement actions as necessary.

The CRTC will implement its decision regarding the establishment of a permanent telephone number registry as part of the National Do Not Call List. In 2013-14, the CRTC reviewed the appropriateness of making numbers on the list permanent, thereby discontinuing the requirements for Canadians to renew registration. The CRTC will also implement its decision regarding the recent proceedings conducted as part of a comprehensive review of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules.

The CRTC will continue to monitor and collaborate with domestic and international partners to determine options for protecting Canadians from caller identification spoofing.

Internal Services

Description:

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
13,510,104 13,510,104 13,509,624 13,509,624

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
114 114 114

Planning Highlights

With a continued focus on maintaining a high-performing organization, the CRTC will continue to advance the Public Service Excellence Agenda toward the delivery of high-quality, Canadian-centred, and results-focused outcomes, while ensuring the efficient and effective management of public funds.

The CRTC will continue to modernize outreach efforts with Canadians and enhance partnerships with external stakeholders. The CRTC’s website will be reviewed and redesigned to enable Canadians, including those with disabilities, to find information more easily and communicate more effectively with the CRTC.

In line with the Government of Canada’s efforts to reduce spending, the CRTC will identify and implement measures that will contribute to reducing the CRTC’s annual operating costs by at least 5% by 2015, and will consider, where appropriate, re-investment or reallocation opportunities in its ongoing operations. Furthermore, the CRTC’s system of internal controls over financial reporting will be enhanced by the implementation of control measures identified by an external audit team in 2013-14. To support the Government of Canada’s Open Governmentinitiative, the CRTC will take steps to provide greater public access to CRTC data.

The CRTC will update its five-year investment plan to ensure that resources are aligned with corporate priorities and that contracting requirements are well planned and properly budgeted. Investment planning is a key element in achieving value for money and sound stewardship of resources.

The CRTC will implement the Government of Canada’s new directive on performance management, which will contribute to maintaining a high-performing public service. Training will be provided to managers and staff on the new performance management framework. To ensure that the CRTC’s workforce remains highly skilled, well trained and high-performing, succession planning and knowledge transfer initiatives will continue.


Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations presented in this subsection is intended to serve as a general overview of the CRTC’s operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues are prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the future-oriented statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of this report are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ. 

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the CRTC’s website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations For the Year Ended March 31 (in dollars)
Financial information Estimated Results 2013−14 Planned Results
2014–15
Change
Total expenses 63,771,000 65,030,000 1,259,000
Total revenues 47,270,000 47,444,000 174,000
Net cost of operations  16,501,000 17,586,000 1,085,000

The variance in total expenses between 2013-14 and 2014-15 is primarily attributed to higher forecasted expenses in 2014-15 related to the accounting for the government-wide transition to “payment in arrears” as well as increased salary costs as a result of changes to collective agreements.

List of Supplementary Information Tables

There are no supplementary information tables for the CRTC.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.


Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Les Terrasses de la Chaudière, Central Building,
1 Promenade du Portage, Gatineau QC J8X 4B1 or Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N2
Canada

Telephone : 819-997-0313
Fax : 819-994-0218
TDD : 819-994-0423
Web : http://www.crtc.gc.ca

 

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