Report on Plans and Priorities 2016-2017

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Download this report in PDF

Table of Contents

Minister's Message

Mélanie Joly

Every year, the organizations in the Canadian Heritage Portfolio highlight the talent of Canadian creators, as well as the diversity of our culture and of our artistic, historical and documentary heritage. These organizations, including the Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), have an important role to play in ensuring the success of Canadian content and on promoting services that support our two official languages. They also contribute to the success of the digital shift in a diverse array of projects, while reaffirming our values of openness and respect in all their activities.

Modern communications are instrumental to full participation in Canada's democratic and cultural life. As the regulator of Canada's communication system, the CRTC seeks to ensure that all Canadians have access to a world-class communication system. To pursue this commitment, the CRTC will take a closer look at the discoverability of audiovisual content as well as its policies regarding basic telecommunications services in Canada. This will help Canadians participate fully in today's digital economy.

As Minister of Canadian Heritage, I am pleased to present the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities prepared by the CRTC. I encourage you to take a look at this report for an overview of the activities and responsibilities of the CRTC in the coming year.

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

A Note on the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities

The 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities of the Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) provides information on how it will support the Government in achieving our agenda in the coming year. I am fully confident that the CRTC is prepared to successfully support me and work with our partners inside and outside government to deliver for Canadians. However, given our commitment to more effective reporting, this year's report will be the final submission using the existing reporting framework.

The Prime Minister and the President of the Treasury Board are working to develop new, simplified and more effective reporting processes that will better allow Parliament and Canadians to monitor our Government's progress on delivering real change to Canadians. In the future, the CRTC's report to Parliament will focus to be more transparent on how we are using our resources to fulfill our commitments and achieve results for Canadians.

These new reporting mechanisms will allow Canadians to more easily follow the CRTC's progress towards delivering on our priorities, which were outlined in the Prime Minister's mandate letter to me.

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer's Message

Jean-Pierre Blais

I am pleased to present the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission's (CRTC) 2016-2017 Report on Plans and Priorities. The report outlines the main activities that the CRTC will carry out in support of its mission to ensure that Canadians have access to a world-class communications system.

The CRTC will work to ensure that Canadians have access to compelling content, as well as a choice of innovative wireless services and Internet services, wherever they live in the country. We will also ensure that Canadians are better protected within the communication system.

Last December, we collaborated with the National Film Board of Canada to initiate a discussion on the discoverability of audiovisual content in the digital world. In May 2016 we will host a Discoverability Summit in Toronto. This unique international event will bring together high-profile innovators and experts from various fields to explore strategies, tools and approaches that can help content stand out and be discovered by audiences, both in Canada and abroad.

The CRTC will also review its policies regarding basic telecommunications services. This broad proceeding will examine which voice and broadband Internet services are required by Canadians to meaningfully participate in the digital economy and to access important services such as e-health, e-learning, and online banking and government services.

The communication system can help improve the security and safety of Canadians. In the coming months, we will establish standards for the delivery on cellphones of emergency alert messages to protect the life and property of citizens. We will also ensure the telecommunications system is ready for next-generation 911 services, which will provide other means for Canadians to seek help by sending, for example, text messages, pictures and videos to 911 call centres. We will also pursue our efforts to promote compliance with Canada's anti-spam legislation, the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules and the Voter Contact Registry.

To support these initiatives, the CRTC will engage Canadians, as well as continue working with its partners, in Canada and abroad.

Jean-Pierre Blais
Chairman and CEO of the CRTC

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister:
Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage

Institutional Head:
Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Ministerial Portfolio:
Canadian Heritage

Year of Commencement:
1968

Main Legislative Authorities:

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an administrative tribunal that regulates and supervises Canadian broadcasting and telecommunications in the public interest, as well as enhances the privacy and safety of Canadians.

The CRTC's main responsibilities include the following:

Regulatory Policy, Legislative Implementation and Regulation
Outreach and Engagement with Stakeholders and Canadians
Monitoring, Compliance and Enforcement

In addition, the CRTC annually updates a Three-Year PlanEndnote vii that details forecasted activities with respect to its three pillars: Create, Connect, and Protect.

The CRTC undertakes its responsibilities with a focus on Canadians-as citizens, creators and consumers. Canada's communication system continues to evolve in a complex and dynamic manner, and is of growing importance to the lives of Canadians.

Strategic Outcome(s) and Program Alignment Architecture

1. Strategic Outcome: Canadians have access to a world-class communication system

1.1 Program: Canadian Content Creation

1.1.1 Sub-Program: Diverse Canadian Content

1.1.2 Sub-Program: Compelling Canadian Content

1.2 Program: Connection to the Communication System

1.2.1 Sub-Program: Quality Communication Services

1.2.2 Sub-Program: Affordable Communication Services

1.3 Program: Protection Within the Communication System

1.3.1 Sub-Program: Safety-Enhancing Communication Services

1.3.2 Sub-Program: Unsolicited Commercial Communications

Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority: Modernizing the regulatory framework for the Canadian broadcasting system
Description

The CRTC has a legislative mandate to regulate and supervise the broadcasting system in Canada. Television and radio programming offered by the broadcasting system is important to Canadians because it provides them with news and information, entertains and enlightens them, and enriches them with a shared cultural and social experience. In the age of digital technologies, marked by an abundance of scheduled and on-demand programming choices available on many platforms (e.g. cable, satellite, the Internet and mobile devices), the broadcasting system should continue to provide programming that is diverse and compelling. The CRTC's regulatory approach involves implementation of the revised regulatory framework set out in the Let's Talk TV decisions to ensure that the broadcasting system keeps pace with advances in the industry and the changing needs of Canadians, as consumers, creators and citizens, for years to come.

Priority TypeFootnote 1

Previously committed to

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Implement decisions and begin monitoring the effectiveness of the new policies coming out of the Let's Talk TV regulatory framework released in March 2015. Let's Talk TV was a multi-phase process aimed at building a forward-looking framework to help shape the future of television in Canada. Subsequent decisions and three new policies were released at the end of the process and introduce changes in a measured and responsible way. The policies will promote the creation of compelling and diverse Canadian programming, maximize programming choices for TV viewers and enable consumers to make informed choices about television service providers. March 2015 To be determined 1.1 Canadian Content Creation
Other initiatives related to the broadcasting system include:
Hosting a Discoverability Summit-a unique, authoritative, world-class international event aimed at bringing together high-profile innovators and experts from various fields to explore forward-looking approaches, business models, strategies and mechanisms to help Canadian programs stand out and be discovered by audiences that are used to abundant content unhindered by borders; May 2016 May 2016  
Conducting hearings and issuing decisions for certain French-language and English-language TV broadcasters; and January 2016 May 2016  
Continuing to (i) set conditions and issue licences for broadcasting undertakings to operate in Canada, (ii) process broadcasting applications and (iii) respond to requests for formal and informal dispute resolution. Ongoing Ongoing  
Priority: Improving access to advanced and competitive communications services
Description

The communication system in Canada enables Canadians to participate in the democratic, economic, social and cultural life of their country, region, province and community. For Canadian businesses, the communication system is key to serving their clients and helping their employees work more productively. Healthy competition among multiple service providers across the country is required for Canadians, including those in rural and remote areas, as well as those with disabilities, to have access to a world-class communications system. Guided by its legislative mandate, the CRTC regulates where market forces are not sufficient to produce, promote and sustain a competitive telecommunications market. Such regulatory measures include requiring large incumbent telephone and cable companies to provide access to essential wholesale telecommunications services for their competitors in a manner that encourages ongoing investment and innovation, as well as more choice for Canadians.

Priority Type

Previously committed to

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Conclude a review of CRTC policies regarding basic telecommunications services in Canada, including an oral public hearing and associated decisions. In this review, the CRTC will examine (i) which telecommunications services (e.g. voice and broadband services) are required by all Canadians to meaningfully participate in the digital economy, (ii) the CRTC's role in ensuring the availability of affordable basic telecommunications services to all Canadians, (iii) the availability of telecommunications services across Canada and (iv) whether any regions in Canada are underserved or unserved; April 2015 To be determined 1.2 Connection to the Communication System
Follow up on the implementation of recent regulatory policies, e.g. those that set out the wholesale regulatory framework for wireline services and for mobile wireless services, to ensure the timely and efficient implementation of the associated regulatory measures; and May 2015(wireless)
July 2015 (wireline)
To be determined  
Continue to process and issue decisions on applications, including applications to review and vary telecommunications orders and decisions, and to address requests for staff-assisted dispute resolution. Ongoing/as they arise Ongoing/as they arise  
Priority: Strengthening the security and safety of Canadians within the communication system
Description

Canadians are becoming increasingly reliant on communications services offered through digital technology. Use of these services is enhancing the lives of Canadians. For example, digital services have the potential to enhance the safety and security of Canadians by enabling them to more effectively access emergency services (such as 9-1-1 services), and by providing them with timely warnings of imminent peril. However, digital services make Canadians vulnerable to communications to which they have not consented, that could violate their privacy or that may deter their participation in the digital economy. Such communications include telemarketing calls, unwanted commercial electronic messages, the unauthorized alteration of transmission data and the unauthorized installation of computer programs. In addition, the prevention of rogue and/or misleading calls to Canadians in the context of federal elections is key to the democratic process.

Priority Type

Previously committed to

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Continue to enhance the performance of the 9-1-1 emergency services system; Ongoing Ongoing 1.3 Protection Within the Communication System
Promote and monitor compliance with relevant legislation, rules and regulations, conduct investigations and take enforcement actions, including imposing administrative monetary penalties in cases of non-compliance; OngoingEndnote viii Ongoing  
Increase engagement with international agencies and the private sector on enforcement activities and emerging issues, including caller identification spoofing; and October 2013 To be determined  
Assess the performance of the new Voter Contact Registry following the October 2015 federal election, and adjust the registry as required to help protect Canadian voters from rogue and/or misleading telephone calls during elections. January 2016 March 2017  
Priority: Building a high-performance organization
Description

Building a high-performing organization is key to the CRTC's ability to ensure that Canadians have access to a world-class communications system. A healthy, enriching work environment, a skilled, productive workforce and efficient and effective business processes are key to the CRTC's success in delivering services for Canadians.

Priority Type

Previously committed to

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Continue to align with the Government of Canada's priorities and initiatives with respect to efficiencies and the effectiveness of programs; and Ongoing Ongoing Internal Services
Continue to provide staff and Commissioners with the tools and training they need to work effectively. Ongoing Ongoing  

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Minister's mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada's websiteEndnote ix.

Risk Analysis

Today, no business, industry or organization is immune to the impacts of rapidly evolving technologies or the changing patterns of how Canadians interact with these technologies. Since the industries and activities the CRTC regulates are at the forefront of the digital revolution (with trends such as the fragmented consumption of content, the proliferation of platforms, the vertical integration of distribution channels, increased demand for broadband, and increased opportunities for malicious use of technologies), there are a number of risks to the CRTC's potential to fully serve the public interest and meet the expectations of Canadians. Here are some of the key risks and what the CRTC is doing about them.

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

The CRTC may not be able to ensure that a wealth of Canadian content is created and that Canadians have a choice of affordable quality communications services.

  • The CRTC will continue to monitor and strategically analyze market conditions and technological developments to advance regulatory policies.
  • The CRTC will engage in continuous dialogue with Canadians, creators, and service providers to identify and analyze trends.
  • The CRTC will continue to collaborate with external parties on the promotion and discoverability of programming made by Canadians.
1.1 Canadian Content Creation
1.2 Connection to the Communication System

The CRTC may not be able to anticipate and effectively respond to Canadians' privacy, security and safety needs within the communication system.

  • The CRTC will enhance its collaborative efforts with key international and domestic organizations to strengthen its protection mechanisms.
  • The CRTC will focus its enforcement efforts using an intelligence-led approach, and publicize high impact cases to protect Canadians and promote compliance.
  • The CRTC will enhance public awareness so that Canadians can protect themselves within the communication system.
  • The CRTC will proactively research possible enhancements to 911 networks and evolve its regulations as appropriate.
1.3 Protection Within the Communication System

The CRTC's workforce may not have access to the appropriate tools, skills and expertise at the right time to fulfill the organization's mandate.

  • The CRTC will continue to conduct strategic human resource planning, including talent management, training and learning, and succession planning.
  • The CRTC will review its current Human Resources Management model and will work on methods and procedures to respond to present and future needs.
  • The CRTC will consider innovative partnerships (internally and externally), strategies and approaches to enhance its knowledge base and to access specialized expertise and tools.
All programs and internal services
Risk Narrative

As Canadians consume content and services on a multitude of broadcasting and telecommunications platforms, the CRTC continues to consider new approaches to meet its policy objectives under the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act. As part of these objectives, the CRTC aims to ensure that Canadians have access to Canadian content and quality and affordable broadcasting and telecommunications services. To help it achieve these goals, the CRTC held its Let's Talk TV proceeding in 2014 and released new related policies. As a next step, the CRTC will monitor the broadcasting industry's implementation of the new regulatory framework governing the Canadian broadcasting system. The CRTC will also host a Discoverability Summit to explore ways to help Canadian programs stand out amidst the abundance of content on multiple platforms. The changing needs and preferences of Canadians with regard to telecommunications services, as well as the emergence of new service providers and service offerings, also challenge the CRTC's ability to achieve the policy objectives under the Telecommunications Act. As a result, the CRTC is currently reviewing its policies regarding basic telecommunications services in Canada to better understand Canadians' telecommunications service needs.

As opportunities for malicious use of technology increases, there is a need for the CRTC to continuously seek new ways to strengthen the privacy, security and safety of Canadians within the communication system and for its program, policies, rules and regulations to evolve. The CRTC will continue to collaborate with key stakeholders, as well as with the public at large, to strengthen its protection mechanisms. The CRTC will work on public awareness tools to empower Canadians to protect themselves from nuisance telecommunications, and evolving threats. It will continue to investigate violations and undertake strategic enforcement actions to bring entities into compliance.

It is impossible for the CRTC's workforce to have expertise in every aspect of the technological revolution. However, the CRTC will aim to achieve its mandate by developing strategic human resource action plans, and making use of talent management initiatives, organized and targeted learning programs, job rotation programs, knowledge transfer and succession plans. It will also pursue partnerships to help grow its knowledge and evidence bases, and to tap the next generation of expertise it needs.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross expenditures 59,808,783 59,808,783 59,808,783 59,808,783
Respendable Revenue 47,685,088 47,685,088 47,685,088 47,685,088
Net Expenditures 12,123,695 12,123,695 12,123,695 12,123,695
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
465 465 465
Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcome(s), Program(s) and Internal Services 2013-14
Expenditures
2014-15
Expenditures
2015-16
Forecast Spending
2016-17
Main Estimates
(Note)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome: 1: Canadians have access to a world-class communications system
1.1 Canadian Content Creation 19,411,193 15,249,755 15,316,498 15,102,446 15,102,446 15,102,446 15,102,446
1.2 Connection to the Communication System 23,620,843 18,042,288 19,151,186 19,726,258 19,726,258 19,726,258 19,726,258
1.3 Protection Within the Communication System - 10,458,959 10,880,771 11,107,795 11,107,795 11,107,795 11,107,795
Subtotal 43,032,036 43,751,002 45,348,455 45,936,499 45,936,499 45,936,499 45,936,499
Internal Services Subtotal 14,539,502 14,017,378 14,586,830 13,872,284 13,872,284 13,872,284 13,872,284
Total 57,571,538 57,768,380 59,935,285 59,808,783 59,808,783 59,808,783 59,808,783
Respendable Revenue 47,191,677 46,322,218 47,624,947 47,685,088 47,685,088 47,685,088 47,685,088
Total net expenditures 10,379,861 11,446,162 12,310,338 12,123,695 12,123,695 12,123,695 12,123,695

Note: The total presented in this column is the CRTC's total operating budget which includes vote netted revenues of $47,685,088 and the $12,123,695 reflected in the 2016-17 Main Estimates. The financial information presented in section II is a breakdown of the CRTC's total operating budget by program.

Actual and planned spending reflects gross budgetary expenditures, which include respendable revenue, and statutory expenditures for employee benefit plans.

Further information and explanations on year-over-year expenditures, spending trends and variances are presented in the section entitled Departmental Spending Trend.

For fiscal year 2013-14, the CRTC received the Treasury Board of Canada's (Treasury Board) approval to revise its PAA to include the following programs: Canadian Content Creation, Connection to the Communication System and Internal Services. The Treasury Board approved an additional change for 2014-15 to add the program "Protection Within the Communication System." This new program was funded through a reallocation of resources from the three programs that existed in 2013-14.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016-17 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government FrameworkEndnote x (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2016-17  Planned Spending
Canadians have access to a world-class communications system 1.1 Canadian Content Creation Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 15,102,446
1.2 Connection to the Communication System Economic Affairs A fair and secure marketplace 19,726,258
1.3 Protection Within the Communication System Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 11,107,795
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic affairs 19,726,258
Social affairs 26,210,241
International affairs -
Government affairs -

Departmental Spending Trend

For fiscal year 2016-17, the CRTC plans to spend $59.8 million to meet the expected results of its program activities and contribute to its strategic outcome.

The graph below illustrates the CRTC's spending trend from 2013-14 to 2018-19.

Departmental Spending Trend Graph
This graph illustrates the CRTC's spending trends from 2013-14 to 2018-19. - For sunset programs - anticipated : the actual spending was $0 in 2013-14 to 2014-15. The forecasted spending for 2015-16 is $0. The planned spending from 2016-17 to 2018-19 is $0. For statutory : the actual spending was $6,624,723 in 2013-14 and $6,462,883 in 2014-15. The forecasted spending for 2015-16 is $6,877,018. The planned spending for 2016-17 to 2018-19 is $7,051,100. For voted / vote-netted revenue: the actual spending was $50,946,815 in 2013-14 and $51,305,497 in 2014-15. The forecasted spending for 2015-16 is $53,058,267. The planned spending for 2016-17 to 2017-18 is $52,757,683. The total actual spending was $57,571,538 in 2013-2014 and $57,768,380 in 2014-15. The total forecasted spending for 2015-16 is $59,935,285. The total planned spending for 2016-17 to 2018-19 is $59,808,783.
Departmental Spending Trend Graph
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory 6,624,723 6,462,883 6,877,018 7,051,100 7,051,100 7,051,100
Voted and Vote-netted revenue 50,946,815 51,305,497 53,058,267 52,757,683 52,757,683 52,757,683
Total 57,571,538 57,768,380 59,935,285 59,808,783 59,808,783 59,808,783

For fiscal years 2013-14 and 2014-15, actual spending represents the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts of Canada. The increase in actual spending from 2013-14 to 2014-15 is a combination of increases in expenditures pertaining to: a) a one-time transition payment for implementing salary payment in arrears; b) the compensation adjustments for collective agreements ratified and paid; c) the expenditures for the enforcement and compliance activities with respect to Canada's anti-spam legislation, which came into effect on July 1, 2014; and d) the expenditures related to implementation of the Voter Contact Registry program.

The increase in planned spending in 2015-16 is a combination of the expenditures related to the completion of the development and implementation of the Voter Contact Registry program, the expenditures related to the monitoring of the broadband speeds and network practices of the Internet services providers and the discoverability of Canadian programs.

Projected spending for the fiscal years 2016-17 to 2018-19 corresponds to the planned spending level approved in the Main Estimates. At this time, there are no incremental amounts approved above the Main Estimates levels. Supplementary funding for items such as salary adjustments for new collective agreements and carry-forward adjustments are unknown at this time and therefore not reflected.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the CRTC's organizational appropriations, consult the 2016-17 Main EstimatesEndnote xi.

Section II: Analysis of Program(s) by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Canadians have access to a world-class communications system

Program 1.1: Canadian Content Creation

Description

This program focuses on ensuring that a wealth of Canadian content is created and made available to all Canadians on a variety of platforms. Through its orders, decisions, licensing frameworks, and other regulatory activities, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) encourages the creation of diverse programming that reflects the attitudes, opinions, ideas, values, and artistic creativity of Canadians. By requiring the display of Canadian content in entertainment programming and the provision of information and analysis concerning Canada, the CRTC is enabling Canadians to better participate in their country's democratic and cultural life.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 15,102,446 15,102,446 15,102,446 15,102,446
Respendable Revenue 13,116,212 13,116,212 13,116,212 13,116,212
Net Expenditures 1,986,234 1,986,234 1,986,234 1,986,234
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
115 115 115
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
The broadcasting system provides Canadians with a wealth of Canadian programming Total spending on Canadian television programming projects $2.6 billion March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to ensure that the broadcasting system provides Canadians with a wealth of Canadian programming. This program's contribution will be measured by the total spending of the industry on Canadian television programming.

In addition to its Discoverability and its Let's Talk TV initiatives, outlined under the first priority in Section I, the CRTC will undertake a number of activities to encourage investment in the production and promotion of Canadian programming. These activities include reviewing funding policies for independent programming, monitoring children's programming, as well as implementing certification flexibility to Canadian producers for the production of big-budget Canadian programs and programs based on best-selling novels written by Canadians. The CRTC will complete its review of local and community programming to ensure that appropriate policies and regulations are in place that will lead to the production of locally relevant and locally reflective community television programming.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Diverse Canadian Content
Description

As set out in the Broadcasting Act and through its broadcasting licensing processes and regulatory frameworks, the CRTC supports the creation of diverse Canadian programming that provides a balance of information and entertainment for all Canadians. The CRTC will ensure that Canadian programming is available in both official and minority languages. By providing access to a number of local, regional, and national information sources, Canadians will be better informed and therefore more able to actively participate in our democratic society.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 7,349,797 7,349,797 7,349,797
Respendable Revenue 6,383,171 6,383,171 6,383,171
Net Expenditures 966,626 966,626 966,626
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
54 54 54
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Diverse Canadian programming is created and broadcast Percentage of examined undertakings compliant with regulatory requirements regarding broadcast of Canadian programming 90% March 31, 2017
Percentage of examined undertakings compliant with regulatory requirements to spend and/or contribute to funds or initiatives supporting Canadian content creation 90% March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to implement new and innovative approaches to support the creation of diverse Canadian programming. The effectiveness of this program will be measured by the compliance level of broadcasting undertakings with regulatory requirements to broadcast and spend on Canadian programming.

The CRTC will continue to ensure that a broad variety of programming that reflects the diversity of Canadians (linguistically, geographically, culturally and demographically) is made available in the Canadian broadcasting system. Specifically, it will take measures to ensure that its policies on cultural diversity, ethnic radio, native radio, as well as local and community programming are up to date and responsive to the current environment.

The CRTC will promote access to official language minority broadcasting services and encourage licensees to increase the production and broadcasting of regionally produced programs for official language minority communities.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Compelling Canadian Content
Description

Through the conditions it places on broadcasters and distribution undertakings, the CRTC will ensure that Canadians have access to high quality Canadian programming that is supported by strong production values. Canadian drama and comedy programs that reflect our values and attitudes will be compelling to Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 7,752,649 7,752,649 7,752,649
Respendable Revenue 6,733,041 6,733,041 6,733,041
Net Expenditures 1,019,608 1,019,608 1,019,608
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
61 61 61
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Compelling Canadian programming is created Percentage of total television viewing is to Canadian programming 48% March 31, 2017
Average percentage of radio listening is to Canadian content 50% March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to ensure that compelling Canadian programming is created and will measure the impact of this sub-program through the level of consumption of Canadian content on television and the radio.

The CRTC will conduct public hearings and issue decisions regarding the licence renewal applications of the French-language TV stations owned by Quebecor Media Inc., Remstar Diffusion and Télé-Québec, and the English-language TV groups Bell Media Inc., Shaw Media Inc., Corus Entertainment Inc. and Rogers Media Inc. The CRTC will also conduct a public hearing to review the regulatory framework governing French-language vocal music, in which it will identify innovative ways to support this music in today's digital environment.

As part of the Let's Talk TV regulatory framework, conditions of licence related to genre-protection will be eliminated when broadcasting licences are renewed, which will enable broadcasters to better serve audiences. To ensure that compelling programming is created, and as part of its renewed emphasis on quality over quantity, the CRTC will focus on the amount of money invested in Canadian programming rather than on the number of hours of Canadian programming produced.

The CRTC's simultaneous substitution policyEndnote xii will enable Canadian broadcasters to maximize audiences and revenues in order to support the creation of compelling Canadian programming. The CRTC will also introduce new measures to reduce simultaneous substitution errors, which are a source of frustration for Canadian viewers.

The CRTC will monitor the implementation of a set-top box based audience measurement system. Such a system is aimed at providing broadcasters with a better understanding of the needs and interests of Canadian viewers.

Program 1.2: Connection to the Communication System

Description

The CRTC facilitates the orderly development of a communication system for all Canadians in order to strengthen the social and economic fabric of Canada and enhance the safety and interests of Canadians. This program focuses on ensuring that Canadians can connect to a choice of accessible, innovative, and quality communication services at affordable prices, and thereby have access to, amongst other things, compelling and creative Canadian programming.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 19,726,258 19,726,258 19,726,258 19,726,258
Respendable Revenue 17,184,045 17,184,045 17,184,045 17,184,045
Net Expenditures 2,542,213 2,542,213 2,542,213 2,542,213
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
148 148 148
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
The communications system provides quality and affordable communication service options to Canadians Percentage of retail telecommunication revenues from competitive markets 94% March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to ensure that the Canadian communication system provides quality and affordable service options to Canadians. The CRTC will measure the effectiveness of this sub-program through the percentage of retail telecommunications service revenues from competitive markets (i.e. the markets that the CRTC has determined are sufficiently competitive that tariff filings are no longer required.).

In addition to reviewing basic telecommunications services, as described under the second priority in Section I, the CRTC will monitor compliance with its requirement for broadcasting distribution undertakings (BDUs) to provide a $25 entry-level service offering by March 2016 and also to enable Canadians to purchase discretionary programming services on a pick-and-pay basis and in small, reasonably priced packages, by December 2016.

The CRTC has determined that BDUs with under 20,000 subscribers that compete in larger markets with licensed BDUs no longer have to obtain a broadcasting licence, thereby increasing competition and choice for Canadians. The CRTC will create and maintain a list of these BDUs so that Canadians can determine which ones offer services in their market. As part of its regulatory framework for wholesale wireline services, the CRTC has adopted new measures, including the requirement to implement disaggregated wholesale high-speed access services that will support facilities-based competition. The CRTC will follow up on its transition plan for the implementation of its framework.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Quality Communication Services
Description

Through its regulatory frameworks, the CRTC contributes to ensure that Canadians have a choice of quality communication service providers for telephone, Internet access, wireless and broadcasting distribution services. The CRTC monitors the broadband speeds and network practices of Internet service providers to ensure that they meet the expectations of Canadians and are capable of providing Canadians with access to new and innovative services. The CRTC reviews and updates its regulatory decisions and provides alternative dispute resolution services to ensure that impediments to a competitive marketplace for the delivery of communication services are addressed. As well, the CRTC continues to develop regulatory frameworks and coordinate the activities of industry groups to provide Canadians with disabilities access to communication services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 10,308,614 10,308,614 10,308,614
Respendable Revenue 8,980,096 8,980,096 8,980,096
Net Expenditures 1,328,518 1,328,518 1,328,518
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
77 77 77
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Quality and accessible communication services Percentage of households that have access to broadband speeds of at least 5megabits per second (Mbps) downstream and 1 Mbps upstream 100% December 31, 2016
Percentage of retail quality of service indicators met by local telephone companies 95% December 31, 2016
Percentage of examined undertakings in compliance with regulatory requirements regarding accessibility 100% March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to ensure that Canadians have access to quality and accessible communications services. The effectiveness of this sub-program will be measured by the level of access that Canadians have to specific broadband speeds, the quality of service provided by local telephone companies and the compliance level of examined undertakings with regulatory requirements regarding accessibility.

As part of its commitment to quality communications services, the CRTC will publish results from the first year of its national broadband performance measurement initiative, consider expanding the current program to include smaller internet service providers and explore possibilities to extend the program to measure the performance of mobile and wireless service providers. It will also initiate a review of Northwestel Inc.'s regulatory framework which will be completed in 2017-18. In addition, the CRTC will continue to monitor the company's network modernization plan annually until 2018-19.

As part of its commitment to accessible communications services, the CRTC will monitor the implementation of video relay service - a basic telecommunications service that enables people with hearing or speech disabilities who use sign language to communicate with voice telephone users-and conduct activities to increase awareness of this service. It will begin a process to examine the regulatory framework for message relay service (MRS), which will include, among other things, the development of quality of service guidelines/standards. MRS enables people with hearing or speech disabilities to communicate with voice telephone users via text messages.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Affordable Communication Services
Description

The CRTC seeks to ensure that Canadians are able to connect to telephone, Internet access, wireless and broadcasting distribution services at rates that are affordable and provide value. The CRTC assesses tariffs provided by service providers, monitors developments in the communications industry, monitors consumer complaints and provides information to consumers to ensure that Canadians can make informed choices between service providers who offer innovative and affordable packages of services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 9,417,644 9,417,644 9,417,644
Respendable Revenue 8,203,949 8,203,949 8,203,949
Net Expenditures 1,213,695 1,213,695 1,213,695
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
71 71 71
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Consumers have communication service choices Percentage of households that have access to three or more service providers for broadband Internet service 95% March 31, 2017
Percentage of households that have access to three or more broadcasting distribution undertakings 95% August 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to ensure that Canadians have a choice of affordable communications services and will measure the effectiveness of this sub-program through the level of competition in retail markets.

The CRTC will examine the price ceiling of C-band fixed satellite services. Telecommunications service providers use C-band fixed satellite services to offer voice, broadband and business services to customers in Northern communities. In this review, the Commission will contemplate whether the price ceiling, which has been in place since 1999, continues to be appropriate in the context of today's market conditions and, if so, whether the level of the price ceiling should change. The CRTC will aim to ensure that consumers in the North have access to greater choice of affordable telecommunications services.

The CRTC will also review the competitor quality of service indicators and the rate rebate plan for competitors to ensure that they align with its wholesale services framework. The Commission established competitor quality of service indicators to monitor the provision of certain legacy services by the incumbent telephone companies to competitors. Failure by an incumbent telephone company to meet an established standard triggers a rate rebate to the competitor that was subject to the below-standard performance. In its review, the Commission aims to promote competition and choice in telecommunications services and the provision of innovative, high-quality communications services.

Program 1.3: Protection within the Communication System

Description

Through this program, the CRTC promotes compliance with and enforcement of its various laws and regulations, including unsolicited communications. It helps to ensure that Canadians have access to emergency communication services such as 9-1-1 service and alerting systems. As a result, Canadians have increased protection and benefit from a more secure communication system.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 11,107,795 11,107,795 11,107,795 11,107,795
Respendable Revenue 5,955,790 5,955,790 5,955,790 5,955,790
Net Expenditures 5,152,005 5,152,005 5,152,005 5,152,005
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
83 83 83
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Canadian communication services contribute to the protection and safety of Canadians Percentage of Canadians who consider that the CRTC is taking measures to enhance their safety and protection in the communication system 50% March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to ensure that the security, privacy and safety of Canadians are respected and enhanced within the Canadian communication system. The effectiveness of this sub-program will be measured through public opinion research conducted every two years. The implementation of compliance and enforcement measures, in collaboration with domestic and international partners and counterparts, is key to enabling the CRTC to protect Canadians within the communication system.

The CRTC will also continue to respond to complaints and take measures to strengthen compliance with its rules governing the loudness of commercial messages.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Safety-enhancing Communication Services
Description

The CRTC contributes to strengthening a communication system that provides services that enhance the safety of Canadians. Examples of these services include 9-1-1 emergency response services and access, and public alerting systems. The CRTC monitors the development of, and broadcaster participation in, the public alert system. In order to ensure that the 9-1-1 system remains up to date, the CRTC continues to enhance the regulatory framework for next generation 9-1-1 systems.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 2,265,762 2,265,762 2,265,762
Respendable Revenue 1,214,859 1,214,859 1,214,859
Net Expenditures 1,050,903 1,050,903 1,050,903
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
17 17 17
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Communication service providers offer safety-enhancing services Percentage of broadcasters participating in public alerting system 80% March 31, 2017
Percentage of facilities-based telecommunication service providers in compliance with 911 requirements 100% March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to ensure that the Canadian communication system contributes to the safety and security of Canadians through emergency response services. The effectiveness of the sub-program will be measured through the broadcasting industry's level of compliance with new regulations requiring their full participation in the National Public Alerting System, and the compliance level of telecommunications service providers with 9-1-1 service requirements.

In addition, the CRTC will conduct a public hearing and a comprehensive examination of next-generation 9-1-1 services in Canada, in which it will explore the regulatory framework and may enable new modes of communication for requesting emergency assistance, such as through text messages, videos and images. The CRTC will also implement proactive measures to help ensure the reliability and resiliency of 9-1-1 networks in Canada, and will monitor the performance of wireless service providers in providing accurate caller location information to 9-1-1 call centres. The CRTC will monitor broadcasters' participation in the emergency alerting system and intends to initiate a public proceeding on wireless public alerting service standards.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Unsolicited commercial communications
Description

The CRTC enhances the privacy and protection of Canadians, including Canadian consumers, by promoting compliance with and enforcement of its rules and regulations relating to unsolicited communications, including those related to the National Do Not Call List (DNCL) and Canada's anti-spam legislation (CASL). In order to make Canadians more aware of the measures available to protect themselves from unsolicited communications, the CRTC designs public education and outreach activities for the DNCL and CASL. The CRTC also develops domestic and international partnerships in order to facilitate enforcement activities related to the DNCL and CASL. The CRTC investigates complaints and takes appropriate enforcement actions for both the DNCL and CASL.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 8,842,033 8,842,033 8,842,033
Respendable Revenue 4,740,931 4,740,931 4,740,931
Net Expenditures 4,101,102 4,101,102 4,101,102
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
66 66 66
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Unsolicited commercial communications violations are reduced Percentage of unsolicited commercial messages (spam) reduced within 12 month period 10% March 31, 2017
Percentage of organizations that remain compliant within 12 months after compliance/enforcement action taken 80% March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

The CRTC will continue to ensure that the Canadian communication system contributes to the privacy of Canadians by taking measures to reduce the volume of unsolicited commercial communications. The reduction of spam will be measured by comparing the number of submissions to the Spam Reporting Centre from entities before, and in the 12 months after, the CRTC takes enforcement actions. With respect to unwanted telemarketing calls, the effectiveness of this sub-program will be measured by the percentage of organizations that remain compliant with the Unsolicited Telecommunication Rules in the 12 months following a CRTC enforcement action.

The CRTC will continue to promote and monitor compliance with CASL, the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules and the Voter Contact Registry, and will investigate and respond to cases of non-compliance. Outreach and targeted communications, including enforcement advisories, will continue to be undertaken. The CRTC will continue to (i) transition to an intelligence-led approach, using enhanced data analytics and risk assessment methodologies to inform operations, (ii) promote compliance with the law, (iii) identify the most egregious cases of non-compliance for enforcement actions and (iv) leverage strategic relationships and enforcement efforts with domestic and international partners to share best practices and intelligence.

Following a public consultation held in 2015-16, the CRTC will implement initiatives that will harness the expertise of industry, academia and law enforcement agencies to identify and implement technical solutions that will empower Canadians to protect themselves from unsolicited and illegitimate telemarketing calls. In addition, a plan for the future National DNCL Operator will be developed, in preparation for the end of the current contract in January 2018.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 13,872,284 13,872,284 13,872,284 13,872,284
Respendable Revenue 11,429,041 11,429,041 11,429,041 11,429,041
Net Expenditures 2,443,243 2,443,243 2,443,243 2,443,243
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
119 119 119
Planning Highlights

The CRTC will enhance its website and digital presence to ensure that it continues to engage with Canadians and meet their information needs. The CRTC will also continue to modernize its outreach efforts with Canadians and collaborate with external partners. For example, the CRTC will seek to enhance collaborations with university partners to promote policy research and enhance its evidence base. In support of the Government of Canada's Directive on Open GovernmentEndnote xiii, the CRTC will continue to provide greater public access to its data via the Government of Canada's Open Data PortalEndnote xiv.

The CRTC will update its five-year investment plan to ensure that resources are aligned with corporate priorities and that contracting requirements are well-planned and properly budgeted. Investment planning is a key element in achieving value for money and sound stewardship of resources.

The CRTC continues to actively search for opportunities offered by Shared Services Canada and other departments to share and/or leverage resources and infrastructure in order to increase the efficiency of the division's service delivery.

To ensure a highly skilled, well-trained and high-performing workforce, the CRTC will undertake a human resources management (HRM) transformation to improve its methods and procedures and to determine an appropriate HRM model. The CRTC will build on 2014 Public Service Employee Survey results to continue to address areas of desired improvement. In addition, the CRTC will leverage the new Canada School of Public Service enterprise-wide commitment to learning to contribute to staff retention and succession planning.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the CRTC's operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Report on Plans and Priorities are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the CRTC's websiteEndnote xv.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31, 2016
(dollars)
Financial Information 2015-16
Forecast Results
2016-17
Planned Results
Difference
(2016-17 Planned Results minus 2015-16 Forecast Results)
Total expenses 66,787,000 67,657,000 870,000
Total revenues 47,685,000 47,685,000 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 19,102,000 19,972,000 870,000

There is a planned increase in expenses of approximately $0.8 million (1.3%) in 2016-17 versus 2015-16. This is primarily attributed to increases in salary related expenses.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities are available on the CRTC's website.

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Tax Expenditures and EvaluationsEndnote xvi publication. The tax measures presented in that publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

CRTC Central Office

Les Terrasses de la Chaudière, Central Building,
1 Promenade du Portage, Gatineau QC J8X 4B1
Canada

or

Ottawa, ON K1A 0N2

CRTC Telephone

In Canada:
Toll-free: 1-877-249-CRTC (2782)
Toll-free TTY line: 1-877-909-CRTC (2782)

Outside Canada:
819-997-0313
(TTY line): 819-994-0423

Fax: 819-994-0218

Website : http://www.crtc.gc.ca

Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation:

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures:

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report:

Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full time equivalent:

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes:

A set of 16 high level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure:

A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non budgetary expenditures:

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance:

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator:

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting:

The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending:

For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans:

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities:

Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program:

A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture:

A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities:

Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

results:

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures:

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome:

A long term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program:

A time limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target:

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures:

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

whole-of-government framework:

Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government wide, high level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Date modified: